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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:赵建中 大小:bloJexRj38350KB 下载:5ntZQDtU73900次
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日期:2020-08-08 03:11:24
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The Physicion being gone, and they repairing to their sicke Sonne,the Mother began with him in this manner. Sonne, I was alwayesperswaded, that thou wouldest not conceale any secret from me, orthe least part of thy desires; especially, when without enjoying them,thou must remaine in the danger of death. Full well art thouassured, or in reason oughtest to be, that there is not any thingfor thy contentment, be it of what quality soever, but it shouldhave beene provided for thee, and in as ample manner as for mineowne selfe. But though thou hast wandred so farre from duty, andhazarded both thy life and ours, it commeth so to passe, that Heavenhath beene more mercifull to thee, then thou wouldest be to thy selfe,or us. And to prevent thy dying of this disease, a dreame this nighthath acquainted me with the principall occasion of thy sickenesse,to wit extraordinary affection to a young Maiden, in some such placeas thou hast seene her. I tell thee Sonne, it is a matter of nodisgrace to love, and why shouldst thou shame to manifest as much,it being so apt and convenient for thy youth? For if I were perswaded,that thou couldst not love, I should make the lesse esteeme of thee.Therefore deare Sonne, be not dismayed, but freely discover thineaffections. Expell those disastrous drouping thoughts, that haveindangered thy life by this long lingering sicknesse. And let thysoule be faithfully assured, that thou canst not require any thingto be done, remaining within the compasse of my power, but I willperforme it; for I love thee as dearely as mine owne life. Settherefore aside this nice conceit of shame and feare, revealing thetruth boldly to me, if I may stead thee in thy love; resolving thyselfe unfaignedly, that if my care stretch not to compasse thycontent, account me for the most cruell Mother living, and utterlyunworthy of such a Sonne.
2.  When they had washed, and were seated at the Tables, dinner wasserved in most magnificent sort; so that if the Emperor himself hadbin there, he could not have bin more sumptuously served. And althoughSaladine and his Baschaes were very Noble Lords, and wonted to seematters of admiration: yet could they do no lesse now, but ratherexceeded in marvaile, considering the qualitie of the Knight, whomthey knew to bee a Citizen, and no Prince or great Lord. Dinnerbeing ended, and divers familiar conferences passing amongst them:because it was exceeding hot, the Gentlemen of Pavia (as it pleasedThorello to appoint) went to repose themselves awhile, and hekeeping company with his three guests, brought them into a goodlyChamber, where, because he would not faile in the least scruple ofcourtesie, or conceale from them the richest jewell which he had; hesent for his Lady and wife, because (as yet) they had not seene her.
3.  WHEREBY PLAINLY APPEARETH, THAT A SODAINE WITTY AND MERRY ANSWER,
4.  In the meane while; Egano returned home from Hawking, and so sooneas he had supt (being very weary) he went to bed, and his Ladielikewise with him, leaving her Chamber doore open, according as shehad promised. At the houre appointed, Anichino came, finding the doorebut easily put too, which (being entred) softly he closed againe, inthe same manner as he found it. Going to the beds side where theLady lay, and gently touching her brest with his hand, he found her tobe awake, and perceiving he was come according unto promise, sheecaught his hand fast with hers, and held him very strongly. Then,turning (as she could) towards Egano, she made such meanes, as heeawaked, whereupon she spake unto him as followeth.
5.  OF THE DISCOURSES OR NOVELLS THERE TO BE RECOUNTED, DOE CONCERNE
6.  The first day that I felt this fiery heate,

计划指导

1.  When notice heereof was given to the Potestate, he arose; and sheebeing brought foorth into the Hall before him, he questioned with her,how and by what meanes this accident happened. Beside, he sent fordivers Physitians, to be informed by them, whether the Gentlemanwere poysoned, or otherwise murthered? All of them affirmed thecontrarie, avouching rather, that some Impostumation had engenderedneere his heart, which sodainly breaking, occasioned his as sodainedeath. The Potestate hearing this, and perceiving that Andreana waslittle or nothing at all faulty in the matter, her beauty and goodcarriage, kindled a vitlanous and lustful desire in him towards her,provoking him to the immodest motion, that upon granting hisrequest, he would release her. But when he saw, that all hisperswasions were to no purpose, hee sought to compasse his will byviolence; which like a vertuous and valiant Virago, shee worthilywithstood, defending her honour Nobly, and reprooving him with manyinjurious speeches, such as a lustfull Letcher Justlie deserved.
2.  The Provost presently gathering, that the truth in this case waseasie to be knowne; sent first for Master Doctor Mazzeo, to know,whether he compounded any such water, or no: which he affirmed to betrue, and upon what occasion he prepared it. Then the Joyner, theowner of the Chest, and the two Lombards, being severally questionedwithall: it appeared evidently, that the Lombards did steale the Chestin the night season, and carried it home to their owne house. In theend, Ruggiero being brought from the prison, and demanded, where hewas lodged the night before, made answer, that he knew not where.Onely he well remembred, that bearing affection to the Chamber-maideof Master Doctor Mazzeo della Montagna, she brought him into aChamber, where a violl of water stoode in the Window, and he beingextreamly thirsty, dranke it off all. But what became of him afterward(till being awake, he found himselfe enclosed in a Chest, and in thehouse of the two Lombards) he could not say any thing.
3.  By this time, the Sergeants and other Officers of the City,ordinarily attending on the Magistrate, being raised by the tumultof this uproare, were come into the house, and had poore Ruggierocommitted unto their charge: who bringing him before the Governor, wasforthwith called in question, and known to be of a most wicked life, ashame to all his friends and kindred. He could say little forhimselfe, never denying his taking in the house, and thereforedesiring to finish all his fortunes together, desperately confessed,that he came with a fellonious intent to rob them, and the Governorgave him sentence to be hanged.
4.  Worthy Ladies, it exceedeth the power of my capacitie, to censure inthe case whereof I am to speake, by saying, who sinned most, eitherNature, in seating a Noble soule in a vile body, or Fortune, inbestowing on a body (beautified with a noble soule) a base or wretchedcondition of life. As we may observe by Cistio, a Citizen of our owne,and many more beside; for, this Cistio beeing endued with a singulargood spirit, Fortune hath made him no better then a Baker. And beleeveme Ladies, I could (in this case) lay as much blame on Nature, as onFortune; if I did not know Nature to be most absolutely wise, and thatFortune hath a thousand eyes, albeit fooles have figured her to beeblinde. But, upon more mature and deliberate consideration, I finde,that they both (being truly wise and judicious) have dealt justly,in imitation of our best advised mortals, who being uncertaine of suchinconveniences, as may happen unto them, do bury (for their ownbenefit) the very best and choicest things of esteeme, in the mostvile and abject places of their houses, as being subject to leastsuspition, and where they may be sure to have them at all times, forsupply of any necessitie whatsoever, because so base a conveyance hathbetter kept them, then the very best chamber in the house could havedone. Even so these two great commanders of the world, do many timeshide their most precious Jewels of worth, under the clouds of Artsor professions of worst estimation, to the end, that fetching themthence when neede requires, their splendor may appeare to be themore glorious. Nor was any such matter noted in our homely BakerCistio, by the best observation of Messer Geri Spina, who was spokenof in the late repeated Novell, as being the husband to Madame Oretta;whereby this accident came to my remembrance, and which (in a shortTale) I will relate unto you.
5.  Now, it came to passe (within no long while after) that Fortunebeing favourable to our injured Scholler, prepared a new accident,wherby he might fully effect his harts desire. For the lusty yongGallant, who was Madame Helenaes deare darling and delight, and (forwhose sake) she dealt so inhumanely with poore Reniero: became wearyof her amourous service, and was falne in liking of another Lady,scorning and disdaining his former Mistresse; whereat shee grewexceedingly displeased, and began to languish in sighes and teares.
6.  I make my moane to thee, and do not fable,

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1.  Needlesse were any fresh relation to you, what manner of peoplethose three men were, Calandrino, Bruno, and Buffalmaco, becausealready you have had sufficient understanding of them. Andtherefore, as an induction to my discourse, I must tell you, thatCalandrino had a small Country-house, in a Village some-what neereto Florence, which came to him by the marriage of his Wife. Amon otherCattle and Poultry, which he kept there in store, hee had a youngBoare readie fatted for Brawne, whereof yearly he used to kill one forhis owne provision; and alwaies in the month of December, he and hiswife resorted to their village house, to have a Brawne both killed andsalted.
2.  Let me (quoth he) admit the case, that none of these surmises areintended, but her Kinsman (by and in this manner devised) must bringme into her house: I am not therefore perswaded, that he or they docovet, to have the body of Scannadio, either to carry it thither, orpresent it to her, but rather do aime at some other end. May not Iconjecture, that my close murthering is purposed, and this wayacted, as on him that (in his life time) had offended them? The Maidhath straitly charged me, that whatsoever is said or done unto me, Iam not to speake a word. What if they pul out mine eies, teare outmy teeth, cut off my hands, or do me any other mischiefe: Where am Ithen? Shall all these extremities barre me of speaking? On the otherside, if I speake, then I shall be knowne, and so much the sooner(perhaps) be abused. But admit that I sustaine no injurie at all, asbeing guilty of no transgression: yet (perchance) I shall not becarried to her house, but to some other baser place, and afterward sheshall reprove me, that I did not accomplish what shee commanded, andso all my labour is utterly lost.
3.  Then I protest, to do my best,
4.  The three Brethren at Florence, bounding within no limites theirdisordered spending; borrowed dayly more and more. And after somefew yeares, the creditors seeing no effect of their hopes to come fromthem, all credit being lost with them, and no repayment of promiseddues, they were imprisoned, their Landes and all they had, notsuffising to pay the moitie of Debts, but their bodies remained inprison for the rest, theyr Wives and young children being sent thence,some to one village, some to another, so that nothing now was to beexpected, but poverty and misery of life for ever. As for honestAlessandro, who had awaited long time for peace in England, perceyvingthere was no likelyhoode of it; and considering also, that (beside histarrying there in vaine to recover his dues) he was in danger of hislife; without any further deferring, he set away for Italy. It came topasse, that as he yssued foorth of Bruges, hee saw a young Abbotalso journeying thence, being cloathed in white, accompanied withdivers Monkes, and a great traine before, conducting the needfullCarriage. Two auncient Knights, kinsmen to the King, followed after;with whom Alessandro acquainted himselfe, as having formerly knownthem, and was kindely accepted into their company. Alessandro ridingalong with them, courteously requested to know, what those Monkswere that rode before, and such a traine attending on them? Wheretoone of the Knights thus answered.
5.   THE FOURTH DAY, THE EIGHT NOVELL
6.  This benefite of familiar conference, beganne to embolden his hopes,elevate his courage, and make him seeme more youthfull in his owneopinion, then any ability of body could speake unto him, or promisehim in the possession of her, who was so farre beyond him, and sounequall to be enjoyed by him; yet to advance his hopes a greatdeale higher, Newes came, that Osbech was vanquished and slaine, andthat Bassano made every where havocke of all: whereon they concludedtogether, not to tarrie there any longer, but storing themselveswith the goods of Osbech, secretly they departed thence to Rhodes.Being : g seated there in some indifferent abiding, it came topasse, that Antiochus fell into a deadly sickenesse, to whom came aCyprian Merchant, one much esteemed by him, as beeing an intimatefriend and kinde acquaintance, and in whom hee reposed no smallconfidence. Feeling his sickenesse to encrease more and more uponhim dayly, hee determined, not onely to leave such wealth as hee hadto this Merchant, but the faire Lady likewise. And calling them bothto his beds side, he spake in this manner.

应用

1.  So sweet and pleasing seemed the Song to the King (who tooke nosmall delight, both to heare and behold the Damosels) even as if allthe Hirarchies of Angels were descended from the Heavens to singbefore him. No sooner was the Song ended, but (humbly on theirknees) they craved favour of the King for their departing. Now,although their departure was greatly grieving to him, yet (inoutward appearance) he seemed willing to grant it.
2.  The yong Lady, who fixed not her eyes on inferiour subjects (butesteemed her selfe above ordinary reach or capacity) could moovethem artificially, as curious women well know how to doe, looking onevery side about her, yet not in a gadding or grosse manner: forshe was not ignorant in such darting glaunces, as proceeded from anenflamed affection, which appearing plainely in Reniero; with a prettysmile, shee said to her selfe. I am not come hither this day in vaine;for, if my judgement faile me not, I thinke I have caught aWoodcocke by the Bill. And lending him a cunning looke or two,queintly caried with the corner of her eye; she gave him a kinde ofperswading apprehension, that her heart was the guide to her eye.And in this artificial Schoole-tricke of hers, shee carryedtherewith another consideration, to wit, that the more other eyesfedde themselves on her perfections, and were (well-neere) lost inthem beyond recovery: so much the greater reason had he to account hisfortune beyond comparison, that was the sole master of her heart,and had her love at his command.
3.  Consuming comfort with ore-speedy haste,
4、  The Mistresse understanding now apparantly, the full effect of thewhole businesse, and in what manner it had bene carried, revealed tothe Maide her husbands speeches, concerning the glasse of sleepieWater, which was the onely engine of all this trouble, clearlyacquitting Ruggiero of the robbery, howsoever (in desparate fury,and to make an end of a life so contemptible) he had wrongfullyaccused himselfe. And notwithstanding this his hard fortune, whichhath made him much more infamous then before, in all the dissolutebehaviour of his life: yet it could not quaile her affection towardshim; but being loath he should dye for some other mans offence, andhoping his future reformation; she fell on her knees before herMistresse, and (drowned in her teares) most earnestly entreated her,to advise her with some such happy course, as might be the safety ofpoore Ruggieroes life. Mistresse Doctor, affecting her Maidedearely, and plainely perceiving, that no disastrous fortunewhatsoever, could alter her love to condemned Ruggiero; hoping thebest hereafter, as the Maide her selfe did, and willing to save liferather then suffer it to be lost without just cause, she directedher in such discreet manner, as you will better conceive by thesuccesse.
5、  It came to passe, that Spinelloccio, by often resorting to the houseof Zeppa, as well in his absence, as when he abode at home; beganne toglance amorous looks on Zeppaes wife, and pursued his unneighbourlypurpose in such sort: that hee being the stronger perswader, and she(belike) too credulous in beleeving, or else overfeeble inresisting; from private imparlance, they fell to action; and continuedtheir close fight a long while together, unseene and withoutsuspition, no doubt to their equall joy and contentment.But, whether as a just punishment, for breaking so loving a league offriendship and neighbour-hood, or rather a fatall infliction, evermoreattending on the closest Cuckoldry, their felicity still continuing inthis kinde: it fortuned on a day, Zeppa abiding within doors, contraryto the knowledge of his wife, Spinelloccio came to enquire for him,and she answering (as she verily supposed) that he was gon abroad:uppe they went both together into the Hall, and no bodie being thereto hinder what they intended, they fell to their wonted recreationwithout any feare, kissing and embracing as Lovers use to do.

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网友评论(k474fCG475953))

  • 王文龙 08-07

      Sir Simon hugging her in his armes, and fetching a vehement sigh,said. My Belcolore, how long shall I pine and languish for thy love?How now Sir Simon? answered she, is this behaviour fitting for an holyman? Holy-men Belcolore, (quoth Sir Simon) are made of the same matteras others be, they have the same affections, and therefore subjectto their infirmities. Santa Maria, answered Belcolore, Dare Priestsdoe such things as you talke of? Yes Belcolore (quoth he) and muchbetter then other men can, because they are made for the very bestbusinesse, in which regard they are restrained from marriage. True(quoth Belcolore) but much more from medling with other mens wives.Touch not that Text Belcolore, replyed Sir Simon, it is somewhat aboveyour capacity: talke of that I come for, namely thy love, my Ducke,and my Dove, Sir Simon is thine, I pray thee be mine.

  • 姚陈二 08-07

      Let passe the wanton follies passing betweene them, and come toMadame Catulla, who finding it a fit and convenient time, to ventforth the tempest of her spleene, began in this manner. Alas! howmighty, are the misfortunes of women, and how ill requited is allthe loyall love of many wives to their husbands? I, a pooremiserable Lady, who, for the space of eight yeeres now fullycompleated, have loved thee: more dearely then mine owne life, findenow (to my hearts endlesse griefe) how thou wastest and consumestthy desires, to delight them with a strange woman, like a most vileand wicked man as thou art. With whom doest thou now imagine thy selfeto be? Thou art with her, whom thou hast long time deluded by falseblandishments, feigning to affect her, when thou doatest in thydesires else-where. I am thine owne Catulla, and not the wife ofRicciardo, trayterous and unfaithfull man, as thou art. I am sure thouknowest my voyce, and I thinke it a thousand yeeres, until wee may seeeach other in the light, to doe thee such dishonour as thou justlydeservest, dogged, disdainfull, and villainous wretch. By conceivingto have another woman in thy wanton embraces thou hast declared morejoviall disposition, and demonstrations of farre greater kindnesse,then domesticke familiarity. At home thou lookest sower, sullen orsurly, often froward, and seldome well pleased. But the best is,whereas thou intendest this husbandrie for another mans ground, thouhast (against thy will) bestowed it on thine owne, and the waterhath runne a contrary course, quite from the current where thoumeantst it.

  • 王学珺 08-07

       So much delight my beauty yeelds to mee,

  • 童周静 08-07

      I cannot deny, but that some do affirme, that the Woman had turnedthe face of the Asses head towards Fiesola, and a Country Travailerpassing by the Vine, having a long piked staffe on his necke: thestaffe (by chance) touched the head, and made it turne divers timesabout, and in the end faced Florence, which being the cal forFrederigoes comming, by this meanes he was disappointed. In likemanner some say, that Monna Tessaes prayer for conjuring the Spirit,was in this order.

  • 艾达里安·金格斯利·休斯 08-06

    {  So I can thinke none true, none sure,

  • 游建伟 08-05

      The young Gentleman, though poore, being neither blocke nor dullard,perceived what he made no outward shew of, and understood himselfeso sufficiently, that holding it no meane happinesse to be affected byher, he thought it very base and cowardly in him, if he should notexpresse the like to her againe. So loving mutually (yet secretly)in this maner, and she coveting nothing more, then to have privateconference with him, yet not daring to trust any one with so importanta matter; at length she devised a new cunning stratageme, tocompasse her longing desire, and acquaint him with her privatepurpose, which proved to be in this manner. She wrote a Letter,concerning what was the next day to be done, for their secretmeeting together; and conveying it within the joynt of an hollow Cane,in jesting manner threw it to Guiscardo, saying; Let your man make useof this, insteed of a paire of bellowes, when he meaneth to makefire in your Chamber. Guiscardo taking up the Cane, and consideringwith himselfe, that neither was it given, or the wordes thus spoken,but doubtlesse on some important occasion: went unto his lodgingwith the Cane, where viewing it respectively, he found it to be cleft,and opening it with his knife, found there the written Letterenclosed.}

  • 朱慧峰 08-05

      One day, when as yet Neerbale had not lain with her, some of herwomen asked how she had served God in the desert. She replied that shehad served Him by putting the Devil in Hell, and that Neerbale hadcommitted a grievous sin in taking her from such pious work. Then theyasked: "How is the Devil put in Hell?" To which the girl answered withwords and gestures showing how it had been done. The women laughedso heartily that they have not done laughing yet, and said to her:"Grieve not, my child; that is done as well here. Neerbale willserve God right well with thee in this way."

  • 莫德哈 08-05

      Now was our Scholler the onely jocond man of the world, and failednot the time assigned him, but went unto the Ladies house, whereAncilla was ready to give him entertainment, conducting him into thebase Court, where she lockt him up fast, untill her Lady should sendfor him. This night shee had privately sent for her friend also, andsitting merrily at supper with him, told him, what welcome she hadgiven the Scholler, and how she further meant to use him, saying.Now Sir, consider with your selfe, what hot affection I beare tohim, of whom you became so fondly jealous. The which words were verywelcome to him, and made him extraordinarily joyful; desiring to seethem as effectually performed, as they appeared to him by herprotestations.

  • 李路路 08-04

       The Soldan of Babylon sent one of his Daughters, to be joyned inmarriage with the King of Cholcos, who by divers accidents (in thespace of foure yeeres) happened into the custodie of nine men, andin sundry places. At length, being restored backe to her Father, shewent to the saide King of Cholcos, as a Maid, and as at first shewas intended to be his wife.

  • 史依弘 08-02

    {  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, THAT SUCH WOMEN AS WILL MAKE SALE OF THEIR

  • 马晓天 08-02

      Chynon being now wounded to the heart (where never any civillinstruction could before get entrance) with loves piercing dart, bythe bright beauty of Iphigenia, mooved much admiration (falling fromone change to another) in his Father, Kindred, and all else thatknew him. For first, he requested of his Father, that he might behabited and respected like to his other Brethren, whereto right gladlyhe condiscended. And frequenting the company of civill youths,observing also the cariage of Gentlemen, especially such as wereamorously enclined: he grew to a beginning in short time (to thewonder of every one) not onely to understand the first instructionof letters, but also became most skilfull, even amongst them that werebest exercised in Philosophy. And afterward, love to Iphigenia beingthe sole occasion of this happy alteration, not onely did his harshand clownish voyce convert it selfe more mildely, but also heebecame a singular Musitian, and could perfectly play on anyinstrument. Beside, he tooke delight in the riding and managing ofgreat horses, and finding himselfe of a strong and able body, heexercised all kinds of Military Disciplines, as well by Sea, as on theland. And, to be breefe, because I would not seeme tedious in therepetition of all his vertues, scarsly had he attained to the fourthyeare, after he was thus falne in love, but hee became generallyknowne, to be the most civil, wise, and worthy Gentleman, aswell forall vertues enriching the minde, as any whatsoever to beautifie thebody, that very hardly he could be equalled throughout the wholekingdome of Cyprus.What shall we say then (vertuous Ladies) concerning this Chynon?Surely nothing else, but that those high and divine vertues, infusedinto his gentle soule, were by envious Fortune bound and shut up insome small angle of his intellect, which being shaken and set atliberty by love, (as having a farre more potent power then Fortune, inquickning and reviving the dull drowsie spirits) declared his mightyand soveraigne Authority, in setting free so many faire and preciousvertues unjustly detayned, to let the worlds eye behold them truly, bymanifest testimony from whence he can deliver those spiritssubjected to his power, and guid them (afterward) to the highestdegrees of honour. And although Chynon by affecting Iphigenia,failed in some particular things; yet notwithstanding, his FatherAristippus duely considering, that love had made him a man, whereas(before) he was no better then a beast: not onely endured allpatiently, but also advised him therein, to take such courses asbest liked himselfe. Neverthelesse, Chynon (who refused to be calledGalesus, which was his naturall name indeed) remembring that Iphigeniatearmed him Chynon, and coveting (under this title) to accomplishthe issue of his honest amorous desire: made many motions toCiphaeus the Father of Iphigenia, that he would be pleased to lethim enjoy her in marriage. But Ciphaeus told him, that he hadalready passed his promise for her, to a Gentleman of Rhodes, namedPasimondo, which promise he religiously intended to performe.

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