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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘世明 大小:h6zkds2o15158KB 下载:sJ5SIRjo44290次
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日期:2020-08-08 23:26:43
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  It seemed to the whole assembly, that Madam Beatrix, dealte somewhatstrangely, in the manner of beguiling her husband; and affirmedalso, that Anichino had great cause of fear, when she held him sostrongly by her beds side, and related all his amorous temptation. Butwhen the King perceyved, that Madame Philomena sate silent, heturned to Madam Neiphila, willing her to supply the next place; whomodestly smiling, thus began.
2.  Farre from the yong Gentlemans humour was this answer of his Mother,because he aimed not at any dishonourable end: true, faithfull, andhonest love was the sole scope of his intention, foule and loathsomelust he utterly defied; whereupon he fell into sickenesse againe,rather more violently then before. Which the Lady perceiving, revealedher whole intent to Gianetta, and finding her constancie beyond commoncomparison, acquainted her Lord with all she had done, and bothconsented (though much against their mindes) to let him enjoy her inhonourable marriage: accounting it better, for preservation of theironely sons life, to match him farre inferiour to his degree, then bydenying h desire, to let him pine and dye for her love.
3.  Lesca, comforted her Lady, so much as lay in her power to doe, andhaving sought for Pyrrhus, whom she found at good leysure; and, in apleasing humor, thus she beganne. Pyrrhus, some few dayes since Itolde thee, in what extreame Agonies thy Lady and mine was, onely inregarde of her love to thee: and now againe I come once more, togive thee further assurance thereof: Wherefore, beleeve itunfeignedly, that if thy obstinacie continue still, in like manneras the other day it did, expect very shortly to heare the tydings ofher death.
4.  At her comming, they arose, and having received hir with greatreverence, they seated her in the midst, kindly cherishing the twoChildren. After some gracious Language past on eyther side, shedemanded of whence, and what they were, which they answered in thesame kind as they had done before to her husband. Afterward, with amodest smiling countenance, she sayd. Worthy Gentlemen, let not myweake Womanish discretion appeare distastable, in desiring to craveone especiall favour from you, namely, not to refuse or disdaine asmall gift, wherewith I purpose to present you. But considering first,that women (according to their simple faculty) are able to bestowbut silly gifts: so you would be pleased, to respect more the personthat is the giver, then the quality or quantity of the gift.
5.  Before many dales were past, it was his fortune to meete withBlondello, who having told this jest to divers of his friends, andmuch good merriment made thereat: he saluted Guiotto in ceremoniousmanner, saying. How didst thou like the fat Lampreyes and Sturgeon,which thou fedst on at the house of Messer Corso Donati? Wel Sir(answered Guiotto) perhaps before eight dayes passe over my head, thoushalt meet with as pleasing a dinner as I did. So, parting away fromBlondello, he met with a Porter or burthen-bearer, such as are usuallysent on errands; and hyring him to deliver a message for him, gave hima glasse bottle, and bringing him neere to the Hal-house ofCavicciuli, shewed him there a knight, called Signior PhillipoArgenti, a man of huge stature, stout, strong, vain-glorious, fierceand sooner mooved to anger then any other man. To him (quothGuiotto) thou must go with this bottle in thy hand, and say thus tohim. Sir, Blondello sent me to you, and courteously entreateth you,that you would enrubinate this glasse bottle with your best ClaretWine; because he would make merry with a few friends of his. Butbeware he lay no hand on thee, because he may bee easi induced tomisuse thee, and so my businesse be disappointed. Well Sir replied thePorter, shal I say any thing else unto him? No (quoth Guiotto) only goand deliver this message, and when thou art returned, Ile pay thee forthy paines.
6.  Before poore Pedro could have any intelligence, or so much assuspected any treachery against him; he was suddenly apprehended,and being called in question, stood not on any deniall, butconfessed truly what hee had done: whereupon, within some few dayesafter, he was condemned by the Captaine, to be whipt to the place ofexecution, and afterward to be hanged by the necke. Signior Amarigo,because he would cut off (at one and the same time) not onely thelives of the two poore Lovers, but their childes also; as afranticke man, violently carried from all sense of compassion, evenwhen Pedro was led and whipt to his death: he mingled strong poyson ina Cup of wine, delivering it to a trusty servant of his owne, and anaked Rapier withall, speaking to him in this manner. Goe carrythese two presents to my late Daughter Violenta, and tell her from me,that in this instant houre, two severall kinds of death are offeredunto her, and one of them she must make choyce of, either to drinkethe poyson, and so dye, or to run her body on this Rapiers point,which if she denie to doe, she shall be haled to the publike marketplace, and presently be burned in the sight of her lewd companion,according as shee hath worthily deserved. When thou hast delivered herthis message, take he- Bastard brat, so lately since borne, and dashhis braines out against the walles, and afterward throw him to myDogges to feede on.

计划指导

1.  THE EIGHT DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
2.  Many notable courses whee.ed about his conceit, every onepromising fairely, and ministring meanes of formall apparance, yet one(above the rest) wonne his absolute allowance, which he intended toprosecute as best he might. In which resolution, he kept still veryclose, so long as Spinelloccio was with his Wife; but hee beinggone, he went into the Chamber, where he found his wife, amendingthe forme of her head attyre, which Spinelloccio had put into adisordred fashion. Wife (quoth be) what art thou doing? Why? Do younot see Husband? answered she. Yes that I do wife, replied Zeppa,and something else happened to my sight, which I could wish that I hadnot seene. Rougher Language growing betweene them, of his avouching,and her as stout denying, with defending her cause over-weakely,against the manifest proofes both of eye and eare: at last she fell onher knees before him, weeping incessantly, and no excuses nowavailing, she confest her long acquaintance with Spinelloccio, andmost humbly entreated him to forgive her. Uppon the which penitentconfession and submission, Zeppa thus answered.
3.  The answer of Lisana pleased the Queene exceedingly, in findingher to be so wise and faire, as the King himself had before informedher: who instantly called for her Father and Mother, and knowingthey would be well pleased with whatsoever he did; he called for aproper yong Gentleman, but somewhat poore, being named Perdicano,and putting certaine Rings into his hand, which he refused not toreceive, caused him there to espouse Lisana. To whome the King gaveimmediately (besides Chaines and jewels of inestimable valew,delivered by the Queene to the Bride) Ceffala and Calatabelotta, twogreat territories abounding in divers wealthy possessions, saying toPerdicano. These wee give thee, as a dowry in marriage with thisbeautifull Maid, and greater gifts we will bestow on thee hereafter,as we shal perceive thy love and kindnesse to her.
4.  As the Fishes were throwne up to the servant, alive as they were, hetooke the best and fairest of them, and brought them to the Table,where they skipt and mounted before the King, Count Guy de Montfortand the Father: some leaping from the Table into the Pond againe,and others, the King (in a pleasing humour) voluntarily threw backe tothe Damosels. jesting and sporting in this manner, till the servanthad drest divers of them in exquisite order, and served them to theTable according as Signior Neri had ordained. When the Damosels sawthe Fishes service performed, and perceived that they had fishedsufficiently: they came forth of the water, their garments then (beingwet) hanging close about them, even as if they hid no part of theirbodies. Each having taken those things againe, which at first theybrought with them, and saluting the king in like humility as theydid before, returned home to the mansion house.
5.  These things, and many more (fitter for silence, then forpublication) were so deepely displeasing to the Jew, being a mostsober and modest man; that he had soone seene enough, resolving on hisreturne to Paris, which very speedily he performed. And whenJehannot heard of his arrivall, crediting much rather other newes fromhim, then ever to see him a converted Christian; he went to welcomehim, and kindly they feasted one another. After some few dayes ofresting, Jehannot demanded of him; what he thought of our holyFather the Pope and his Cardinals, and generally of all the otherCourtiers? Whereto the Jew readily answered; It is strange Jehannot,that God should give them so much as he doth. For I will truely tellthee, that if I had beene able to consider all those things, whichthere I have both heard and seene: I could then have resolved myselfe, never to have found in any Priest, either sanctity, devotion,good worke, example of honest life, or any good thing else beside. Butif a man desire to see luxury, avarice, gluttony, and such wickedthings, yea, worse, if worse may be, and held in generall estimationof all men; let him but goe to Rome, which I thinke rather to be theforge of damnable actions, then any way leaning to grace or goodnesse.And, for ought I could perceive, me thinkes your chiefe Pastour, and(consequently) all the rest of his dependants, doe strive so much asthey may (with all their engine arte and endevour) to bring tonothing, or else to banish quite out of the world, Christian Religion,whereof they should be the support and foundation.
6.  Their love continuing on still in this kinde, Tingoccio prooved sofortunate in the businesse, that having better meanes then hiscompanion, and more prevayring courses, when, where, and how toCourt his Mistresse, which seemed to forward him effectually. Allwhich Meucio plainely perceived, and though it was tedious andwearisome to him, yet hoping to finde some successe at length: hewould not take notice of any thing, as fearing to infringe the amitybetweene him and Tingoccio, and so his hope to be quite supplanted.Thus the one triumphing in his loves happinesse, and the otherhoping for his felicity to come; a lingering sickenesse seazed onTingoccio, which brought him to so low a condition, as at the lengthhe dyed.

推荐功能

1.  Now was the Marquesse sufficiently satisfied in his soule, that hehad seene so much as he desired, concerning the patience of hisWife, who in so many hart-grieving trials, was never noated so much asto alter her countenance. And being absolutely perswaded, that thisproceeded not from any want of understanding in her, because he knewher to be singularly wise: he thought it high time now, to free herfrom these afflicting oppressions, and give her such assurance asshe ought to have. Wherefore, commanding her into his presence, openlybefore all his assembled friends, smiling on her, he said. Whatthinkst thou Grizelda of our new chosen Spouse? My Lord (quoth she)I like her exceeding well, and if she be so wise, as she is faire(which verely I thinke she is) I make no doubt but you shall live withher, as the onely happy man of the world. But I humbly entreat yourHonor (if I have any power in me to prevaile by) that you would notgive her such cutting and unkind language, as you did to your otherwife: for I cannot thinke her armed with such patience, as should(indeed) support them: as wel in regard she is much yonger, as alsoher more delicate breeding and education, whereas she who you hadbefore, was brought up in continual toile and travaile.
2.  Shall I tearme her a woman, or rather some savage monster in awomans shape? Hath shee not made an open prostitution of herhonesty, broken her plighted faith to her Husband, and all the womanlyreputation shee had in this World? Her Husband, being an honourableCitizen, entreating her alwayes, as few men else in the City doe theirwives; what an heart-breake must this needes bee to him, good man?Neither I, nor any honest man else, ought to have any pity on her, but(with our owne hands) teare her in peeces, or dragge her along to agood fire in the Market place, wherein she and her minion should beconsumed together, and their base ashes dispersed abroad in the winde,least the pure Aire should be infected with them.
3.  LOVE TO THEM: EXCEPT THEY INTEND TO SEEKE THEIR OWNE
4.  He that rideth before, is a yong Gentleman, and our Kinsman, whois newly elected Abbot of one of the best Abbeys in England, andbecause he is more yong in yeeres, then the decrees for such a dignitydo allow, we travaile with him to Rome, to entreat our Holy Father,that his.youth may be dispensed withall, and he confirmed in thesaid dignitie; but hee is not to speake a word to any person. Onrode this new Abbot, sometimes before his Traine, and other whilesafter, as we see great Lords use to do, when they ride upon theHigh-wayes.
5.   Then the Children began to cry, saying; that they would tarriestil by the good olde man, because he loved them better then theirMaster did; whereat both the Lady and the Count began to smile. TheCount, a poore Begger, and not as Father to so great a Lady, arose,and did her humble reverence, because she was now a Noble Woman,conceyving wonderfull joy in his soule, to see her so faire and goodlya creature: yet could she take no knowledge of him, Age, want, andmisery had so mightily altered him; his head all white, his beardwithout any comly forme, his Garments so poore, and his face sowrinkled, leane and meager, that he seemed rather some Carter, thena Count. And Gianetta perceiving that when her Children were fetchtaway, they returned againe to the olde man, and would not leave him,she desired their Maister to let them alone.While thus the Children continued making much of the good olde man,Lord Andrew Mandevile, Father to Sir Roger, came into the Hall, asbeing so willed to doe by the Childrens Schoolemaster. He being ahastie-minded man, and one that ever-despised Gianetta before, butmuch more since her marriage to his sonne, angerly said; Let themalone with a mischeefe, and so befall them, their best company oughtto bee with beggers, for so they are bred and borne by the Mothersside: and therefore it is no mervaile, if like will to like, a beggersbrats to keepe company with beggers. The Count hearing thesecontemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and althoughhis courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him toexpresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hangingdowne his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach,as hee had done many, both before and after.
6.  THE CHORUS SUNG BY ALL THE REST OF THE COMPANY

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1.  Although I found my liberty was lost.
2.  Panuccio having subtily observed all this, and in what manner theywent to bed; after such a space of time, as he imagined them to be allfast asleepe, he arose very softly, and stealing to the bed ofNicholetta, lay downe gently by her. And albeit she seemed somewhatafraid at the first, yet wheri she perceived who it was, shee ratherbad him welcome, then shewed her selfe any way discontented. Now whilePanuccio continued thus with the maide, it fortuned that a Cat threwdown somewhat in the house, the noise wherof awaked the wife, andfearing greater harme, then (indeed) had hapned, she arose without aCandle, and went groping in the darke, towards the place where sheeheard the noyse. Adriano, who had no other meaning but well, foundoccasion also to rise, about some naturall necessity, and making hispassage in the darke, stumbled on the childes Cradle (in the way)where the woman had set it, and being unable to passe by, withoutremoving it from the place: tooke and set it by his owne beds side,and having done the businesse for which he rose, returned to his bedagaine, never remembring to set the Cradle where first he found it.
3.  Deere Love, and my most worthily respected friend, I perceiveplainly and infallibly, that I am drawing neere unto my end, whichmuch discontenteth me; because my hope was to have lived longer inthis world, for the enjoying of your kinde and most esteemedcompany. Yet one thing maketh my death very pleasing and welcome tome; namely, that lying thus in my bed of latest comfort in thislife, I shall expire and finish my course, in the armes of those twopersons, whome I most affected in all this world, as you myever-deerest friend, and you faire Lady, whom (since the very firstsight of you) I loved and honoured in my soule. Irkesome and veriegreevous it is to me, that (if I dye) I shall leave you here astranger, without the counsaile and helpe of any bodie: and yet muchmore offensive would it become, if I had not such a friend as youheere present, who (I am faithfully perswaded) will have the like careand respect of her (even for my sake) as of my selfe, if time hadallotted my longer tarrying here. And therefore (worthy friend) mostearnestly I desire you, that if I dye, all mine affaires and she mayremaine to your trustie care, as being (by my selfe) absolutelycommended to your providence, and so to dispose both of the one andother, as may best agree with the comfort of my soule. As for you(choice beauty) I humbly entreate, that after my death you would notforget me, to the end, I may make my vaunt in another world, that Iwas affected here by the fairest Lady that ever Nature framed. If ofthese two things you will give mee assurance, I shall depart fromyou with no meane comfort.
4、  Now, notwithstanding the nights obscurity, and impetuous violence ofthe billowes; such as could swimme, made shift to save their livesby swimming. Others caught hold on such things, as by Fortunes favour,floated neerest to them, among whom, distressed Landolpho, desirous tosave his life, if possibly it might be, espied a Chest or Cofferbefore him, ordained (no doubt) to be the meanes of his safety fromdrowning. Now although the day before, he had wished for deathinfinite times, rather then to returne home in such wretchedpoverty; yet, seeing how other men strove for safety of their lives byany helpe, were it never so little, bee tooke advantage of this favouroffred him, and the rather in a necessitie so urgent. Keeping fastupon the Coffer so well as he could, and being driven by the winds andwaves, one while this way, and anon quite contrary, he made shiftfor himselfe till day appeared; when looking every way about him,seeing nothing but clouds, the seas and the Coffer, which one whileshrunke from under him, and another while supported him, accordingas the windes and billowes carried it: all that day and night thushe floated up and downe, drinking more then willingly hee would, butalmost hunger-starved thorow want of foode. The next morning, eitherby the appointment of heaven or power of the Windes, Landolpho who was(well-neere) become a Spundge, holding his armes strongly about theChest, as we have seene some doe, who (dreading drowning) take hold onany the very smallest helpe; drew neere unto the shore of the IlandCorfu, where (by good fortune) a poore woman was scowring disheswith the salt water and sand, to make them (housewife like) neateand cleane.
5、  The woman, whom love had inspired with sprightly counsell,ingeniously enstructing her what to do in this distresse, stearnlythus replyed. Before I will suffer any such shame as thou intendesttowards mee, I will drowne my selfe heere in this Well before ourdoore, where being found dead, and thy villanous jealousie soapparantly knowne, beside thy more then beastly drunkennesse: allthe neighbours will constantly beleeve, that thou didst first strangleme in the house, and afterwardes threw me into this Well. So eitherthou must flie upon the supposed offence, or lose all thy goodes bybanishment, or (which is much more fitting for thee) have thy headsmitten off, as a wilfull murtherer of thy wife; for all will Judge itto be no otherwise. All which wordes, mooved not Tofano a jot from hisobstinat determination: but he still persisting therin, thus shespake. I neither can nor will longer endure this base Villanie ofthine: to the mercy of heaven I commit my soul, and stand there mywheele, a witnesse against so hard-hearted a murtherer.

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  • 崔欢 08-07

      The holy Religious man, so soone as he heard her description ofthe man, presently knew whom shee meant, and highly commending theGentlewoman for her good and vertuous seeming disposition, beleevedfaithfully all that shee had said: promising her, to order thematter so well and discreetly, as shee should not any more beeoffended. And knowing her to be a woman of great wealth (after alltheir usuall manner, when they cast forth their fishing nets forgaine:) liberally he commeuned Almesdeeds, and dayly workes ofCharity, recounting to her beside his owne particular necessities.Then, giving him two peeces of Gold, she said: I pray you (goodFather) to be mindfull of me, and if he chance to make any deniall,tell him, that I spake it my selfe to you, and by the way of a sadcomplaint her confession being ended, and penance easie enoughenjoyned her, she promised to make her parents bountifullBenefactors to the Convent, and put more money into his hand, desiringhim in his Masses, to remember the soules of her deceased friends, andso returned home to her house.

  • 朱启平 08-07

      While matters proceeded in this manner, Marquiso and Stechio,understanding how roughly the Potestates Lieutenant dealt withMartellino, and that he had already given him the Strappado; were inheavy perplexity, saying to themselves; we have carried this businessevery badly, redeeming him out of the Frying-pan, and flinging him intothe fire. Whereupon, trudging about from place to place, and meetingat length with their Host, they told him truly how all had happened,whereat hee could not refraine from laughing. Afterward, he wentwith them to one Master Alexander Agolante, who dwelt in Trevers,and was in great credite with the Cities cheefe Magistrate, to whomhee related the whole Discourse; all three earnestly entreating him,to commisserate the case of poore Martellino.

  • 吴带当风 08-07

       Fresco da Celatico, counselled and advised his Neece Cesca: Thatif such as deserved to be looked on, were offensive to her eyes, asshe had often told him; she should forbeare to looke on any.

  • 柳钧议 08-07

      The wise Gentlewoman replied, that she was well contented, inregard of the severe punishment inflicted on him by God Cupid, for thereproachfull speeches he had given her; to allow him so poore akinde of consolation, as he had requested her to grant him. WhereupponFriar Albert saide: Be ready then Madam to give him welcome tomorrow in the evening, at the entering into your house, for comming inan humane body, he cannot but enter at your doores: n e whereas, if(in powerfull manner) he made use of his wings, he then would Eye inat your window, and then you could not be able to see him.

  • 拉差巴 08-06

    {  Madam Philippa, being accused by her Husband Rinaldo de Pugliese,because he tooke her in Adulterie, with a yong Gentleman namedLazarino de Guazzagliotri: caused her to bee cited before the Judge.From whom she delivered her selfe, by a sodaine, witty, and pleasantanswer, and moderated a severe strict Statute, formerly made againstwomen.

  • 袁艺贾 08-05

      How sir? (quoth she,) your Barber? Uppon mine Honour, there shallcome no Barber heere. Why Sir, it is such a rotten Tooth, and standethso fairely for my hand: that, without helpe or advice of any Barber,let mee alone for plucking it forth without putting you to any paineat all. Moreover, let me tell you Sir, those Tooth-drawers are so rudeand cruell, in performing such Offices, as my heart cannot endure,that you should come within compasse of their currish courtesie,neither shall you Sir, if you will be ruled by me. If I should failein the manner of their facilitie, yet love and duty hath enstructedme, to forbeare your least paining, which no unmannerly Barber willdo.}

  • 徐国栋 08-05

      Well hast thou done therein good Sonne, said the Confessour: but howoftentimes hast thou beene angry? Oh Sir (said Maister Chappelet)therein I assure yee, I have often transgressed. And what man isable to forbeare it; beholding the dayly actions of men to be sodishonest? No care of keeping Gods Commandements, nor any feare of hisdreadfull judgements. Many times in a day, I have rather wished myselfe dead then living, beholding youth pursuing idle vanities, tosweare and forsweare themselves, tipling in Tavernes, and neverhaunting Churches; but rather affecting the worlds follies, then anysuch duties as they owe to God. Alas Sonne (quoth the Friar) this is agood and holy anger, and I can impose no penance on thee for it. Buttell me, hath not rage or furie at any time so over-ruled thee, asto commit murther or man-slaughter, or to speake evill of any man,or to doe any other such kinde of injurie? Oh Father (answered MaisterChappelet) you that seeme to be a man of God, how dare you use anysuch vile words? If I had had the very least thought, to doe anysuch act as you speake, doe you thinke that God would have suffered meto live? These are deeds of darknesse, fit for villaines and wickedlivers, of which hellish crew, when at any time I have happened tomeet with some one of them, I have said; God, God convert thee.

  • 凯嘉 08-05

      I am not able to expresse their counterchanges of courtesie,Saladine commanding him to be cloathed in Royall garments, andbrought into the presence of his very greatest Lords, where havingspoken liberally in his due commendation, he commanded them tohonour him as himselfe, if they expected any grace or favour from him,which every one did immediatly, but (above all the rest) those twoBaschaes, which accompanied Saladine at his house. The greatnesse ofthis pompe and glory, so suddenly throwne on Signior Thorello, madehim halfe forget all matters of Lomberdie; and so much the rather,because he had no doubt at all, but that his letters, were safely cometo the hands of his Uncle.

  • 布斯 08-04

       Calandrino became extraordinarily enamoured of a young Damosell,named Nicholetta. Bruno prepared a Charme or writing for him,avouching constantly to him, that so soone as he touched theDamosell therewith, she should follow him whithersoever hee would haveher. She being gone to an appointed place with him, hee was foundthere by his wife, and dealt withall according to his deserving.

  • 李明武 08-02

    {  Saladine and his friends, being conquerd with such potentperswasions, and already dismounted from their horses, saw that alldeniall was meerly in vaine: and therefore thankfully condiscending(after some few ceremonious complements were over-past) theGentlemen conducted them to their Chambers, which were mostsumptuously prepared for them, and having laid aside their ridinggarments, being a little re reshed with Cakes and choice Wines; theydescended into the dining Hall, the pompe whereof I am not able toreport.

  • 康永哥 08-02

      THE FIRST DAY, THE EIGHT NOVELL

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