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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:霍比屯 大小:Q2pO78eE61905KB 下载:AOzhzFJw62641次
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日期:2020-08-04 23:06:35
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汪永建

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  To which Ulysses answered, "Good luck to you too my friend, andmay the gods grant you every happiness. I hope you will not miss thesword you have given me along with your apology."
2.  "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'
3.  BOOK XXIV.
4.  With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:
5.  "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."
6.  Now the night came on stormy and very dark, for there was no moon.It poured without ceasing, and the wind blew strong from the West,which is a wet quarter, so Ulysses thought he would see whetherEumaeus, in the excellent care he took of him, would take off hisown cloak and give it him, or make one of his men give him one."Listen to me," said he, "Eumaeus and the rest of you; when I havesaid a prayer I will tell you something. It is the wine that makesme talk in this way; wine will make even a wise man fall to singing;it will make him chuckle and dance and say many a word that he hadbetter leave unspoken; still, as I have begun, I will go on. Wouldthat I were still young and strong as when we got up an ambuscadebefore Troy. Menelaus and Ulysses were the leaders, but I was incommand also, for the other two would have it so. When we had comeup to the wall of the city we crouched down beneath our armour and laythere under cover of the reeds and thick brush-wood that grew aboutthe swamp. It came on to freeze with a North wind blowing; the snowfell small and fine like hoar frost, and our shields were coated thickwith rime. The others had all got cloaks and shirts, and sleptcomfortably enough with their shields about their shoulders, but I hadcarelessly left my cloak behind me, not thinking that I should betoo cold, and had gone off in nothing but my shirt and shield. Whenthe night was two-thirds through and the stars had shifted their theirplaces, I nudged Ulysses who was close to me with my elbow, and heat once gave me his ear.

计划指导

1.  "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."
2.  So saying she bound on her glittering golden sandals,imperishable, with which she can fly like the wind over land or sea;she grasped the redoubtable bronze-shod spear, so stout and sturdy andstrong, wherewith she quells the ranks of heroes who have displeasedher, and down she darted from the topmost summits of Olympus,whereon forthwith she was in Ithaca, at the gateway of Ulysses' house,disguised as a visitor, Mentes, chief of the Taphians, and she helda bronze spear in her hand. There she found the lordly suitorsseated on hides of the oxen which they had killed and eaten, andplaying draughts in front of the house. Men-servants and pages werebustling about to wait upon them, some mixing wine with water in themixing-bowls, some cleaning down the tables with wet sponges andlaying them out again, and some cutting up great quantities of meat.
3.  BOOK XXIV.
4.  BOOK IX.
5.  On this the day broke, but Ulysses heard the sound of her weeping,and it puzzled him, for it seemed as though she already knew him andwas by his side. Then he gathered up the cloak and the fleeces onwhich he had lain, and set them on a seat in the cloister, but he tookthe bullock's hide out into the open. He lifted up his hands toheaven, and prayed, saying "Father Jove, since you have seen fit tobring me over land and sea to my own home after all the afflictionsyou have laid upon me, give me a sign out of the mouth of some oneor other of those who are now waking within the house, and let me haveanother sign of some kind from outside."
6.  "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."

推荐功能

1.  She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.
2.  He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:
3.  Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.
4.  "Happy son of Peleus," answered the ghost of Agamemnon, "forhaving died at Troy far from Argos, while the bravest of the Trojansand the Achaeans fell round you fighting for your body. There youlay in the whirling clouds of dust, all huge and hugely, heedlessnow of your chivalry. We fought the whole of the livelong day, norshould we ever have left off if Jove had not sent a hurricane tostay us. Then, when we had borne you to the ships out of the fray,we laid you on your bed and cleansed your fair skin with warm waterand with ointments. The Danaans tore their hair and wept bitterlyround about you. Your mother, when she heard, came with her immortalnymphs from out of the sea, and the sound of a great wailing wentforth over the waters so that the Achaeans quaked for fear. They wouldhave fled panic-stricken to their ships had not wise old Nestorwhose counsel was ever truest checked them saying, 'Hold, Argives, flynot sons of the Achaeans, this is his mother coming from the seawith her immortal nymphs to view the body of her son.'
5.   Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."
6.  On this the maids left off running away and began calling oneanother back. They made Ulysses sit down in the shelter as Nausicaahad told them, and brought him a shirt and cloak. They also broughthim the little golden cruse of oil, and told him to go wash in thestream. But Ulysses said, "Young women, please to stand a little onone side that I may wash the brine from my shoulders and anoint myselfwith oil, for it is long enough since my skin has had a drop of oilupon it. I cannot wash as long as you all keep standing there. I amashamed to strip before a number of good-looking young women."

应用

1.  "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.
2.  "Goddess," replied Ulysses, "do not be angry with me about this. Iam quite aware that my wife Penelope is nothing like so tall or sobeautiful as yourself. She is only a woman, whereas you are animmortal. Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothingelse. If some god wrecks me when I am on the sea, I will bear it andmake the best of it. I have had infinite trouble both by land andsea already, so let this go with the rest."
3.  "Dogs, did you think that I should not come back from Troy? You havewasted my substance, have forced my women servants to lie with you,and have wooed my wife while I was still living. You have fearedneither Cod nor man, and now you shall die."
4、  Then he said to Melanthius the goatherd, "Look sharp, light a firein the court, and set a seat hard by with a sheep skin on it; bring usalso a large ball of lard, from what they have in the house. Let uswarm the bow and grease it we will then make trial of it again, andbring the contest to an end."
5、  Ulysses answered, "Eumaeus, I have heard the story of yourmisfortunes with the most lively interest and pity, but Jove has givenyou good as well as evil, for in spite of everything you have a goodmaster, who sees that you always have enough to eat and drink; and youlead a good life, whereas I am still going about begging my way fromcity to city."

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  • 翁敏 08-03

      But Theoclymenus said, "Eurymachus, you need not send any one withme. I have eyes, ears, and a pair of feet of my own, to say nothing ofan understanding mind. I will take these out of the house with me, forI see mischief overhanging you, from which not one of you men whoare insulting people and plotting ill deeds in the house of Ulysseswill be able to escape."

  • 王华庆 08-03

      "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."

  • 何剑锋 08-03

       Then Telemachus spoke. "Great heavens!" he exclaimed, "Jove musthave robbed me of my senses. Here is my dear and excellent mothersaying she will quit this house and marry again, yet I am laughing andenjoying myself as though there were nothing happening. But,suitors, as the contest has been agreed upon, let it go forward. It isfor a woman whose peer is not to be found in Pylos, Argos, orMycene, nor yet in Ithaca nor on the mainland. You know this as wellas I do; what need have I to speak in praise of my mother? Come on,then, make no excuses for delay, but let us see whether you can stringthe bow or no. I too will make trial of it, for if I can string it andshoot through the iron, I shall not suffer my mother to quit thishouse with a stranger, not if I can win the prizes which my father wonbefore me."

  • 王尚磊 08-03

      The pair went into the outer court as fast as they could, and satdown by Jove's great altar, looking fearfully round, and stillexpecting that they would be killed. Then Ulysses searched the wholecourt carefully over, to see if anyone had managed to hide himself andwas still living, but he found them all lying in the dust andweltering in their blood. They were like fishes which fishermen havenetted out of the sea, and thrown upon the beach to lie gasping forwater till the heat of the sun makes an end of them. Even so werethe suitors lying all huddled up one against the other.

  • 陈幸琳 08-02

    {  Many a plausible tale did Ulysses further tell her, and Penelopewept as she listened, for her heart was melted. As the snow wastesupon the mountain tops when the winds from South East and West havebreathed upon it and thawed it till the rivers run bank full withwater, even so did her cheeks overflow with tears for the husbandwho was all the time sitting by her side. Ulysses felt for her and wasfor her, but he kept his eyes as hard as or iron without lettingthem so much as quiver, so cunningly did he restrain his tears.Then, when she had relieved herself by weeping, she turned to himagain and said: "Now, stranger, I shall put you to the test and seewhether or no you really did entertain my husband and his men, asyou say you did. Tell me, then, how he was dressed, what kind of a manhe was to look at, and so also with his companions."

  • 凯文·霍尔兹沃思 08-01

      Thereon he loosed the bonds that bound them, and as soon as theywere free they scampered off, Mars to Thrace and laughter-loving Venusto Cyprus and to Paphos, where is her grove and her altar fragrantwith burnt offerings. Here the Graces hathed her, and anointed herwith oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and theyclothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty.}

  • 李日花 08-01

      "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get homequickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the godsbefore embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back toyour friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to theheaven fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortalgods that reign in heaven. When you have done this they will let youfinish your voyage.'

  • 雷平 08-01

      "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'

  • 杜汉 07-31

       Telemachus went and knocked at the door of the women's room. "Makehaste," said he, "you old woman who have been set over all the otherwomen in the house. Come outside; my father wishes to speak to you."

  • 王翠 07-29

    {  "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."

  • 石光荣 07-29

      Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.

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