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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:沈建知 大小:tqXlGwc857922KB 下载:MeTJpLRH26194次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:eaGX2eZg21971条
日期:2020-08-07 04:16:47
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洛克希德·马丁公司

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The woman, whom love had inspired with sprightly counsell,ingeniously enstructing her what to do in this distresse, stearnlythus replyed. Before I will suffer any such shame as thou intendesttowards mee, I will drowne my selfe heere in this Well before ourdoore, where being found dead, and thy villanous jealousie soapparantly knowne, beside thy more then beastly drunkennesse: allthe neighbours will constantly beleeve, that thou didst first strangleme in the house, and afterwardes threw me into this Well. So eitherthou must flie upon the supposed offence, or lose all thy goodes bybanishment, or (which is much more fitting for thee) have thy headsmitten off, as a wilfull murtherer of thy wife; for all will Judge itto be no otherwise. All which wordes, mooved not Tofano a jot from hisobstinat determination: but he still persisting therin, thus shespake. I neither can nor will longer endure this base Villanie ofthine: to the mercy of heaven I commit my soul, and stand there mywheele, a witnesse against so hard-hearted a murtherer.
2.  THE INDUCTION TO THE SECOND DAY
3.  When Signior Ansaldo heard her demand, and the offer besidethereuppon made him (although it seemed no easie matter, but a thingmeerly impossible to be done) he considered advisedly, that she madethis motion to no other end, but onely to bereave him of all his hope,ever to enjoy what so earnestly hee desired: neverthelesse, he wouldnot so give it utterly over, but would needs approve what could bedone. Heereupon, hee sent into divers partes of the world, to find outany one that was able to advise him in this doubtfull case. In theend, one was brought to him, who beeing well recompenced for hispaines, by the Art of Nigromancie would under take to do it. Withhim Signior Ansaldo covenanted, binding himselfe to pay a greatsumme of mony, upon performance of so rare a deed, awaiting (inhopefull expectation) for the month of januaries comming. It beingcome, and the weather then in extreamity of cold, every beingcovered with ice and snow, the Magitian prevailed so by his Art,that after the Christmas Holy dayes were past, and the Calends ofjanuary entred: in one night, and without the Cittie Wals, thegoodliest Garden of flowers and fruites, was sodainely sprung up, as(in opinion of such as beheld it) never was the like seen before.Now Ladies, I think I need not demand the question, whether SigniorAnsaldo were wel pleased, or no, who going to beholde t, saw it mostplenteously stored, with al kind of fruit trees, flowers, herbes andplants, as no one could be named, that was wanting in this artificiallgarden. And having gathered some pretty store of them, secretly hesent them to Madam Dianora, inviting hir to come see her Garden,perfected according to her owne desire, and uppon view thereof, toconfesse the integrity of his love to her; considering andremembring withall, the promise shee had made him under solemneoath, that she might be reputed for a woman of her word.
4.  By this, and divers other like worthy deeds, not onely did he winthe hearts of his subjects; but gave occasion to the who world beside,to renowne his fame to all succeeding posterity. Whereto (in thesemore wretched times of ours) few or none bend the sway of theirunderstanding: but rather how to bee cruell and tyrranous Lords, andthereby win the hatred of their people.
5.  CHASTITY OF WOMEN, IT FALLETH OUT (OFTENTIMES) TO BE VERY
6.  That findes no foe like ficklenesse?

计划指导

1.  With a milde, majesticke, and gentle pace, the Queene rode on, beingfollowed by the other Ladies, and the three young Gentlemen, takingtheir way towards the West; conducted by the musicall notes ofsweete singing Nightingales, and infinite other pretty Birds beside,riding in a tract not much frequented, but richly abounding with fairehearbes and flowres, which by reason of the Sunnes high mounting,beganne to open their bosome.
2.  The lacke of these, being life and motion giving:
3.  "Many Philosophers doe hold opinion, that the actions performed bymortall men, doe proceed from the disposing and ordination of theimmortall gods. Whereupon some doe maintaine, that things which bedone, or never are to be done, proceed of necessity: howbeit someother doe hold, that this necessity is onely referred to thingsdone. Both which opinions (if they be considered with mature judgment)doe most manifestly approve, that they who reprehend any thing whichis irrevocable, doe nothing else but shew themselves, as if theywere wiser then the Gods, who we are to beleeve, that withperpetuall reason, and void of any error, doe dispose and governe bothus, and all our actions; In which respect, how foolish andbeast-like a thing it is, presumptuously to checke or controuletheir operations, you may very easily consider; and likewise, howjustly they deserve condigne punishment, who suffer themselves to betransported in so temerarious a manner.
4.  The Clearke comming to the house of Belcolore, found her sittingat dinner with her Husband, and delivering her the Pestell and Morter,performed the rest of Sir Simons message. Belcolore hearing the Cloakedemaunded, stept up to make answere: But Bentivegna, seeming (by hislookes) to be much offended, roughly replyed. Why how now wife? Is notSir Simon our especiall friend, and cannot he be pleasured without apawne? I protest upon my word, I could find in my heart to smitethee for it. Rise quickely thou wert best, and send him backe hisCloake; with this warning hereafter, that whatsoever he will have,be it your poore Asse, or any thing else being ours, let him haveit: and tell him (Master Clearke) he may command it. Belcolore rosegrumbling from the Table, and fetching the Cloake forth of theChest, which stood neere at hand in the same roome; shee deliveredit to the Clearke, saying. Tell Sir Simon from me, and boldly sayyou heard me speake it: that I make a vow to my selfe, he shallnever make use of my Morter hereafter, to beat any more of hissawcinesse in, let my Husband say whatsoever he will, I speake theword, and will performe it.
5.  Love, if I can scape free from forth thy holde,
6.  The meate of my Master,

推荐功能

1.  Then felt my heart such hels of heavy woes,
2.  Being examined concerning this bloudy fact, he plainly confessed,that hee himselfe had committed the murder, and afterward would notdepart from the Cave, but purposely stayed for apprehension, asbeing truely toucht with compunction for so foule an offence: uponwhich eremptorie confession, Marcus Varro being then Praetor, gavesentence that he should be crucified on a Crosse, as it was the usuallmanner of death in those dayes. Titus chancing to come at the sametime into Praetorium, advisedly beholding the face of the condemnedman (as hee sate upon the bench) knew him to bee Gysippus, not alittle wondring at this strange accident, the povertie of hisestate, and what occasion should bring him thither, especially inthe questioning for his life, and before the Tribunall of justice.
3.  As yet, she had milke freshly running in both her brests, byreason of her so late delivery in child bed; wherefore shee laydowne unto the two yong Kids, and taking them tenderly in her armes,suffered each of them to sucke a teate, whereof they made not anyrefusall, but tooke them as lovingly as their dammes, and from thattime forward, they made no distinguishing betweene their damme andher. Thus this unfortunate Lady, having found some company in thissolitary desart, fed on herbes and roots, drinking faire runningwater, and weeping silently to her selfe, so often as she remembredher husband, children, and former dayes past in much better manner.Heere she resolved now to live and dye, being at last deprived both ofthe damme and yonger Kids also, by theyr wandering further into theneere adjoyning Woods, according to their naturall inclinations;whereby the poore distressed Ladie became more savage and wilde in herdaily conditions, then otherwise shee would have bene.
4.  And I cast off, with manifest disgrace.
5.   The Marquesse of Montferrat was a worthy and valiant Knight, whobeing Captaine Generall for the Church, the necessary service requiredhis company on the Seas, in a goodly Army of the Christians againstthe Turkes. Upon a day, in the Court of King Philip, sirnamed theone eyed King (who likewise made preparation in France, for a royallassistance to that expedition) as many speeches were delivered,concerning the valour and manhoode of this Marquesse: it fortuned,that a Knight was then present, who knew him very familiarly, and hegave an addition to the former commendation, that the whole worldcontained not a more equall couple in marriage, then the Marquesse andhis Lady. For, as among all knights, the Marquesse could hardly beparaleld for Armes and Honour; even so his wife, in comparison ofall other Ladies, was scarcely matchable for beauty and vertue.Which words were so weighty in the apprehension of King Philip, thatsodainly (having as yet never seen her) he began to affect her veryearnestly, concluding to embarke himselfe at Gennes or Genoua, thereto set forward on the intended voyage, and journying thither byland, hee would shape some honest excuse to see the Lady Marquesse,whose Lord being then from home, opinion perswaded him over fondly,that he should easily obtaine the issue of his amorous desire.
6.  THE FIFT DAY, THE FIFTH NOVELL

应用

1.  The amorous Duke in his disguise, having long daunced attendanceat Folcoes doore, and no admittance of his entrance; angerlyreturned backe to his Court, protesting severe revenge on Magdalena,if she gave him not the better satisfaction, to cleare her from thusbasely abusing him. On the morrow morning, when Magdalena was foundmurthered in her Chamber, and tidings thereof carried to the Duke;present search was made for the bloody offendor, but Folco beingfled and gone with Ninetta; some there were, who bearing deadly hatredto Hugnetto, incensed the Duke against him and his wife, assupposing them to be guilty of Magdalenaes death. He being theretovery easily perswaded, in regard of his immoderate love to theslaine Gentlewoman; went himselfe in person (attended on by his Guard)to Hugnettoes House, where both he and his wife were seized asprisoners.
2.  Now concerning the skilfull Magitian, to whom Ansaldo meant togive the bountifull recompence agreed on betweene them, hee havingseene the strange liberality, which the husband expressed to SigniorAnsaldo, and that of Ansaldo to the Lady, hee presently saide. Greatjupiter strike me dead with thunder, having my selfe seene a husbandso liberall of his honour, and you Sir of true noble kindnesse, if Ishould not be the like of my recompence: for, perceiving it to be soworthily imployed, I am well contented that you shal keepe it. TheNoble Lord was modestly ashamed, and strove (so much as in him lay)that he should take all, or the greater part thereof: but seeing helaboured meerly in vaine, after the third day was past, and theMagitian had destroyed the Garden againe, hee gave him free liberty todepart, quite controlling all fond and unchaste affection in himselfe,either towards Dianora, or any Lady else, and living (ever after) asbest becommeth any Nobleman to do.
3.  Their conference having long time continued, and the heate of theday being somewhat extraordinary, she called for Greeke wine, andbanquetting stuffe, drinking to Andrea; and he pledging her verycontentedly. After which, he would have returned to his lodging,because it drew neere supper time; which by no meanes shee wouldpermit, but seeming more then halfe displeased, shee saide. Now Iplainely perceive brother, how little account you make of me,considering, you are with your owne Sister, who (you say) you neversaw before, and in her owne House, whether you should alwayes resortwhen you come to this City; and would you now refuse her, to goe andsup at a common Inne? Beleeve me Brother, you shall sup with me, foralthough my Husband is now from home, to my no littlediscontentment: yet you shall find Brother, that his wife, can bid youwelcome, and make you good cheere beside.
4、  The Abbesse verily credited his answer, demanding what he meant insaying, that he did service to nine? Madam, quoth he, this were adangerous question, and not easily answered before fore the eightSisters. Upon this reply, the Abbesse plainely perceived, that notonely she had fallen into foll but all the Nunnes likewise criedguilty too: wherfore being a woman of sound discretion, she wouldnot grant that Massetto should depart, but to keepe him still aboutthe Nunnes businesse, because the Monastery should not bescandalized by him. And the Fac-totum being dead a little before,his strange recovery of speech revealed, and some things else moreneerely concerning them: by generall consent, and with the good likingof Massetto, he was created the Fac-totum of the Monasterie.
5、  Afterward, having recovered the Princesse dead body out of theSea, and enbalmed it with sighes and teares: he returned backe intoSicilie, where he caused it to be most honourably buried, in alittle Island, named Ustica, face to face confronting Trapanum. TheKing of Thunis hearing these disastrous Newes, sent his Ambassadors(habited in sad mourning) to the aged King of Sicilie, complainingof his faith broken with him, and how the accident had falne out.Age being sodainly incited to anger, and the King extreamly offendedat this injury, seeing no way whereby to deny him justice, it beingurged so instantly by the Ambassadors: caused Gerbino to beapprehended, and he himselfe (in regard that none of his Lords andBarons would therein assist him, but laboured to divert him by theirearnest importunity) pronounced the sentence of death on the Prince,and commanded to have him beheaded in his presence; affectingrather, to dye without an heire, then to be thought a King voyde ofjustice. So these two unfortunate Lovers, never enjoyed the very leastbenefite of their long wished desires: ended both their lives inviolent manner.

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网友评论(V4Z1tbuy94048))

  • 沈江华 08-06

      Sometime heeretofore, there dwelt in our Cittie, a Knight namedSignior Theobaldo, who (according as some report) issued from theFamily of Lamberti, but others derive him of the Agolanti; guiding(perhaps) their opinion heerein, more from the traine of Children,belonging to the saide Theobaldo (evermore equall to that of theAgolanti) then any other matter else. But setting aside from whichof these two houses he came, I say, that in his time he was a verywealthy Knight, and had three sonnes; the first being namedLamberto, the second Theobaldo, and the third Agolanto, all goodly andgracefull youths: howbeit, the eldest had not compleated eighteeneyeares, when Signior Theobaldo the Father deceased, who left themall his goods and inheritances. And they, seeing themselves rich inready monies and revennewes, without any other governement thentheir owne voluntary disposition, kept no restraint upon theirexpences, but maintained many servants, and store of unvalewableHorses, beside Hawkes and Hounds, with open house for all commers; andnot onely all delights else fit for Gentlemen, but what vanitiesbeside best agreed with their wanton and youthfull appetites.

  • 宋哲元 08-06

      Panuccio, yawning and stretching out his limbes, with unusuallgroanes and respirations, such as (better) could bee hardlydissembled: seemed to wake as out of a traunce, and calling his friendAdriano, said.

  • 瑞娅 08-06

       Continuing thus a longer while then otherwise he would have done,because his lying in the bare Chest was somewhat uneasie andpainfull to him; turning divers times on the one side, and then asoften againe on the other, coveting still for ease, yet could notfinde any: at length, he thrust his backe so strongly against theChests side, that (it standing on an un-even ground) it began tototter, and after fell downe. In which fall, it made so loud anoise, as the women (lying in the beds standing by) awaked, and wereso overcome with feare, that they had not the power to speake oneword. Ruggiero also being affrighted with the Chests fall, andperceiving how by that meanes it was become open, he thought itbetter, least some other sinister fortune should befall him, to beat open liberty, then inclosed up so strictly. And because he knew notwhere he was, as also hoping to meete with his Mistresse; he wentall about groping in the darke, to find either some staires ordoore, whereby to get forth.

  • 赛义德·阿克巴尔丁 08-06

      Secretly she sent a faithfull Chambermaide of her owne, to greeteAnastasio on her behalfe; humbly entreating him te come see her:because now she was absolutely determined, to give him satisfaction inall which (with honour) he could request of her. Whereto Anastasioanswered, that he accepted her message thankfully, and desired noother favour at her hand, but that which stood with her owne offer,namely, to be his Wife in honourable marriage, The Maide knowingsufficiently, that he could not be more desirous of the match, thenher Mistresse shewed her selfe to be, made answer in her name, thatthis motion would be most welcome to her.

  • 徐全家 08-05

    {  PERSONS, AS ON THEM THAT ARE RICH AND NOBLE

  • 张世勇 08-04

      The two young Lords knew all this matter, before shee thusreported it to them; and therefore, without staying to listen [to] herany longer, but comforting her so wel as they could, with promise oftheir best emploied paines: being informd by her, in what place theLady was so closely kept they took their leave, and parted from her.Often they had heard the Lady much commended, and her incomparablebeauty highly extolled, yea even by the Duke himselfe; which made themthe more desirous to see her: wherfore earnestly they solicited him tolet them have a sight of her, and he (forgetting what happened tothe Prince, by shewing her so unadvisedly to him) made them promise togrant their request. Causing a very magnificent dinner to be prepared,and in a goodly garden, at the Castle where the Lady was kept: onthe morrow, attended on by a smal traine, away they rode to dinewith her.}

  • 陈良宇 08-04

      The Abbesse verily credited his answer, demanding what he meant insaying, that he did service to nine? Madam, quoth he, this were adangerous question, and not easily answered before fore the eightSisters. Upon this reply, the Abbesse plainely perceived, that notonely she had fallen into foll but all the Nunnes likewise criedguilty too: wherfore being a woman of sound discretion, she wouldnot grant that Massetto should depart, but to keepe him still aboutthe Nunnes businesse, because the Monastery should not bescandalized by him. And the Fac-totum being dead a little before,his strange recovery of speech revealed, and some things else moreneerely concerning them: by generall consent, and with the good likingof Massetto, he was created the Fac-totum of the Monasterie.

  • 怀艾特 08-04

      On the contrary side, after midnight was past, Rinuccio Palerminideparted from his lodging, to do what hee was enjoyned by his heartsMistresse, and as hee went along, divers considerations also ran inhis minde, concerning occasions possible to happen. As, falling intothe hands of Justice, with the body of Scannadio upon his backe, andbeing condemned for sacriledge, in robbing graves of the dead;either to be burned, or otherwise so punished, as might make himhatefull to his best friends, and meerely a shame to himselfe.

  • 张春 08-03

       He delighted (beyond measure) and addicted his best studies, tocause enmities and scandals betweene kindred and friends, or any otherpersons, agreeing well together; and the more mischiefe he couldprocure in this kind, so much the more pleasure and delight tooke hetherein. If he were called to kill any one, or to do any othervillanous deede, he never would make deniall, but go to it verywillingly; and divers times it was well knowen, that many were cruellybeaten, ye slaine by his hands. Hee was a most horrible blasphemerof God and his Saints, upon the very least occasion, as being moreaddicted to choller, then any other man could be. Never would hefrequent the Church, but basely contemned it, with the Sacramentsand religious rites therein administred, accounting them for vileand unprofitable things: but very voluntarily would visit Tavernes,and other places of dishonest accesse, which were continually pleasingunto him, to satisfie his lust and inordinate lubricitie. Hee wouldsteale both in publike and private, even with such a conscience, as ifit were given to him by nature so to do. He was a great glutton anda drunkarde, even he was not able to take any more: being also acontinuall gamester, and carrier of false Dice, to cheate with themthe very best Friends he had.

  • 吴慧 08-01

    {  Messer Antonio d'Orso, being Byshoppe of Florence, a vertuous, wise,and reverend Prelate; it fortuned that a Gentleman of Catalogna, namedMesser Diego de la Ratta, and Lord Marshall to King Robert ofNaples, came thither to visite him. Hee being a man of very comelypersonage, and a great observer of the choysest beauties in Court:among all the other Florentine Dames, one proved to bee mostpleasing in his eye, who was a verie faire Woman indeede, and Neece tothe Brother of the saide Messer Antonio.

  • 曾丽珍 08-01

      Ricciardo uttered these words, teares streaming aboundantly downehis cheekes, and Madame Catulla (all the while) likewise showred forthher sorrowes equally to his, now, although she was exceedinglytroubled in mind, and saw what her owne jealous folly had nowbrought her to, a shame beyond all other whatsoever: in the middest ofher tormenting passions, shee considered on the words of Ricciardo,found good reason in them, in regard of the unavoydable evilswhereupon shee thus spake. Ricciardo, I know not how to beare thehorrible injurie, and notorious treason used by thee against me, graceand goodnesse having so forsaken me, to let me fall in so foule amanner. Nor becommeth it me, to make any noyse or out-cry heere,whereto simplicity, or rather devillish jealousie, did conduct me. Butcertaine I am of one thing, that I shall never see any one joyfullday, till (by one meanes or other) I bee reverged on thee. Thou hastglutted thy desire with my disgrace, let me therefore go from thee,never more to looke upon my wronged husband, or let any honest womanever see my face.

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