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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:于俊戎 大小:jHzh7giG70380KB 下载:9CYiuaAu47688次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:i7s7Ja4416941条
日期:2020-08-05 12:56:53
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胡珍珍

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Grizelda, with a patient sufferent soule, hearing what he hadsaid, returned no other answere but this. Most Gracious and HonourableLord, satisfie and please your owne Royall minde, and never use anyrespect of me: for nothing is precious or pleasing to mee, but whatmay agree with your good liking. Within a while after, the NobleMarquesse in the like manner as he did before for the Daughter, sohe sent the same servant for the Sonne, and seeming as if he hadsent it to have been slaine, conveighed it to be nursed at Bologna, incompany of his sweete Sister. Whereat the Lady shewed no otherdiscontentment in any kinde, then formerly she had done for herDaughter, to the no meane marvell of the Marquesse, who protested inhis soule, that the like woman was not in all the world beside. Andwere it not for his heedfull observation, how loving and carefullshe was of her children, prizing them as dearely as her owne life:rash opinion might have perswaded him, that she had no more in her,then a carnall affection, not caring how many she had, so shee mightthus easily be rid of them; but he knew her to be a truely vertuousmother, and wisely liable to endure his severest impositions.
2.  Alas good man, like an armed Watchman, thou satst at thine ownedoore all a cold Winters night, perswading mee (poorelly credulouswoman) that, upon urgent occasions, thou must needs suppe and lodgefrom home. Remember thy selfe therefore better heereafter, become atrue understanding man, as thou shouldst bee, and make not thy selfe amocking stocke to them, who knoweth thy jealous qualities, as wellas I do, and be not so watchfull over me, as thou art. For I sweare bymy true honesty, that if I were but as willing, as thou artsuspitious: I could deceive thee, if thou hadst an hundred eyes, asNature affords thee but two, and have my pleasures freely, yet thou benot a jot the wiser, or my credit any way impaired.
3.  Madame, saide the Pilgrime, the unfortinate young Gentleman thatis slaine, did never love you; but sure I am, that Theobaldo Eliseiloved you deerely. But tell me, what was the occasion whereby youconceived such hatred against him? Did he at any time offend you? Notruly Sir, quoth shee; but the reason of my anger towards him, wasby the words and threatnings of a religious Father, to whom once Irevealed (under confession) how faithfully I affected him, and whatprivate familiarity had passed betweene us. When iristantly he usedsuch dreadfull threatnings to me, and which (even yet) doe afflictmy soule, that I did not abstaine, and utterly refuse him, theDivell would fetch me quicke to Hell, and cast me into the bottomeof his quenchlesse and everlasting fire.
4.  THE FIFT DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
5.  And no longer ago Madam, then this very morning, before my comminghither, I found a woman-messenger in my house, in very closeconference with my Wife, when growing doubtfull of that which was trueindeede, I called my Wife, enquiring, what the woman would have withher; and she told me, it was another pursuite of PhilipelloFighinolfi, who (quoth shee) upon such answers as you have caused meto send him from time to time, perhappes doth gather some hope ofprevailing in the end, which maketh him still to importune me as hedoth. And now he adventureth so farre, as to understand my finallintention, having thus ordered his complot, that when I please, I mustmeet him secretly in a house of this City, where he hath prepared aBath ready for me, and hopeth to enjoy the end of his desire, asvery earnestly he hath solicited me thereto. But if you had notcommanded me, to hold him in suspense with so many frivolousanswers, I would ere this, have sent him such a message, as shouldhave bene little to his liking.
6.  The Tale delivered by Neiphila, maketh mee remember a doubtfullcase, which sometime hapned to another Jew. And because that God,and the truth of his holy Faith, hath bene already very welldiscoursed on: it shall not seeme unfitting (in my poore opinion) todescend now into the accidents of men. Wherefore, I will relate amatter unto you, which being attentively heard and considered; maymake you much more circumspect, in answering to divers questions anddemands, then (perhaps) otherwise you would be. Consider then (mostwoorthy assembly) that like as folly or dulnesse, many times hathoverthrowne some men from place of eminencie, into most great andgreevous miseries: even so, discreet sense and good understanding,hath delivered many out of irksome perils, and seated them in safestsecurity. And to prove it true, that folly hath made many fall fromhigh authority, into poore and despised calamity; may be avouched byinfinite examples, which now were needelesse to remember: But, thatgood sense and able understanding, may proove to be the occasion ofgreat desolation, without happy prevention, I will declare unto you invery few words, and make it good according to my promise.

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1.  And if not I, what Lady else can sing,
2.  Having thus agreed upon this conclusion, and had many merry meetingstogether: one night above the rest, when Frederigo was appointed tosuppe with Monna Tessa, who had made ready two fat Capons, drest inmost dainty and delicate manner: it fell out so unfortunately, thatJohn (whose Kue was not to come that night) came thither very late,yet before Frederigo, wherewith she being not a little offended,gave John a slight supper, of Lard, Bacon, and such like coarseprovision, because the other was kept for a better guest. In the meanetime, and while John was at supper, the Maide (by her Mistressesdirection) had conveighed the two Capons, with boyled Eggs, Breadand a Bottle of Wine (all folded up in a faire cleane table cloth)into her Garden, that a passage to it, without entering into thehouse, and where shee had divers times supt with Frederigo. Shefurther willed the Maide, to set all those things under a Peachtree, which adjoyned to the fields side: but, so angry she was ather husbands unexpected comming, that shee forgot to bid her tarriethere, till Frederigoes comming, and to tell him of Johns being there:as also, to take what he found prepared readie for his Supper.
3.  But of all those rich and sumptuous Beds (if pride of mine owneopinion do not deceive me) them two provided for Buffalmaco and me,had hardly any equall: he having the Queene of France as his Ladyand Mistresse, and I, the renowned Queene of England, the onely twochoise beauties of the whole World, and wee appeared so pleasing intheir eyes, as they would have refused the greatest Monarkes on theearth, rather then to bee rejected by us. Now therefore, you mayeasily consider with your selfe, what great reason we have to livemore merrily, then any other men can doe: in regard we enjoy thegracious favour of two such Royall Queenes, receyving also from them(whensoever wee please to commaund them) a thousand or two thousandFlorines at the least, which are both truly and duly sent us. Enjoyingthus the benefit of this high happinesse, we that are companions ofthis Society, do tearme it in our vulgar Language, The Pyrats voyageto Corsica. Because, as Rovers or Pyrats robbe and take away thegoodes of such as they meete withall, even so do we: only thereremaineth this difference betweene us, that they never restore whatthey have taken: which we do immediately afterward, whether it berequired or no. And thus Master Doctor, as to my most endeered friend,I have now revealed the meaning of sayling to Corsica, after themanner of our private Pyracie, and how important the close retentionof the voiage is, you are best able your selfe to judge: In whichregarde, remember your Oathes and faithfull promises, or else I amundone for ever.
4.  quoth Egano, Yes Wife, he came, but deerely to my cost: for heeverily taking me for thee, hath beaten me most extreamly, calling mean hundred Whores and Strumpets, reputing thee to bee the wickedstWoman living. In good sadnesse Beatrix, I wondred not a little at him,that he would give thee any such vile speeches, with intent to wrongmee in mine honour. Questionlesse, because hee saw thee to bejoviall spirited, gracious and affable towardes all men; therefore heeintended to make triall of thine honest carriage. Well Sir (saydeshee) twas happy that hee tempted mee with words, and let you tastethe proofe of them by deeds: and let him thinke, that I brooke thosewords as distastably, as you do or can, his ill deeds. But seeing heis so just, faithfull, and loyall to you, you may love him the better,and respect him as you finde occasion.
5.  No sooner was poore Guion aloft at the window, calling softly to hisMistresse, as if she had bene there; but he was over-heard by thewomen in the darke: and immediately apprehended by the Guard, whoforthwith brought him before the Lord Marshall, where beingexamined, and he avouching, that Restituta was his elected wife, andfor her he had presumed in that manner; closely was he kept inprison till the next morning. When he came into the Kings presence,and there boldly justified the goodnesse of his cause: Restitutalikewise was sent for, who no sooner saw her deare Love Guion, but sheran and caught him fast about the necke, kissing him in teares, andgreeving not a little at his hard fortune. Heereat the King grewexceedingly enraged, loathing and hating her now, much more thenformerly hee did affect her, and having himselfe seene by what strangemeanes he did climbe over the wall, and then mounted to her Chamberwindow; he was extreamely impatient, and could not otherwise beeperswaded, but that their meetings thus had bene very many.
6.  Within fewe dayes after, he was informed by some of his especiallFriends, that this had never happened to him, but onely to testifie,how understanding the Florentines are, in their ancientconstitutions and customes, to embrace, love and honour, honest,discreet worthy Judges and Magistrates; Whereas on the contrary,they as much condemne miserable knaves, fooles, and dolts, who nevermerit to have any better entertainment. Wherefore, it would be bestfor him, to make no more enquiry after the parties; lest a worseinconvenience should happen to him.

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1.  And then the Queene, somewhat offended at the folly of the formercontroversie, commanded Madame Philomena, that she should givebeginning to the dayes Novels: which (in dutifull manner) sheeundertooke to doe, and seating her selfe in formall fashion, withmodest and very gracious gesture, thus she began.
2.  The other man, being named Giotto, had a spirit of so greatexcellency, as there was not any particular thing in Nature, theMother and Worke-mistresse of all, by continuall motion of theheavens; but hee by his pen and pensell could perfectly portrait;shaping them all so truly alike and resemblable, that they weretaken for the reall matters indeede; and, whether they were present orno, there was hardly any possibility of their distinguishing. Sothat many times it happened, that by the variable devises he made, thevisible sence of men became deceived, in crediting those things tobe naturall, which were but meerly painted. By which meanes, heereduced that singular Art to light, which long time before had lyenburied, under the grosse error of some; who, in the mysterie ofpainting, delighted more to content the ignorant, then to please thejudicious understanding of the wise, he justly deserving thereby, tobe tearmed one of the Florentines most glorious lights. And so muchthe rather, because he performed all his actions, in the true andlowly spirit of humility: for while he lived, and was a Master inhis Art, above all other Painters: yet he refused any such title,which shined the more majestically- in him, as appeared by such, whoknew Much lesse then he, or his Schollers either: yet his knowledgewas extreamly coveted among them.
3.  By this unexpected pennance imposed on Madame Helena, she utterlyforgot her amorous friend; and (from thence forward) carefully kepther selfe from fond loves allurements, and such scornfull behaviour,wherein she was most disorderly faulty. And Reniero the Scholler,understanding that Ancilla had broken her leg, r , which he reputed asa punishment sufficient for her, held himselfe satisfyed, becauseneither the Mistresse nor her Maide, could now make any great boast,of his nights hard entertainment, and so concealed all matters else.
4.  Thou hast (for him) my firm affection tryed.
5.   No sooner had she ended her devoute conjuring prayer, but shesaide to her husband: Now John, cough and spet: which John accordinglydid. And Frederigo, being all this while without, hearing her wittyconjuration of a Spirit, which he himselfe was supposed to be, beingridde of his former jealous suspition: in the middst of all hismelancholy, could very hardly refraine from laughing, the jestappeared so pleasing to him: But when John cought and spet, softlyhe said to himselfe: When next thou spetst, spet out all thy teeth.
6.  Now, it is not to be denyed, that whosoever hath need of helpe,and is to bee governed: meerely reason commandeth, that they shouldbee subject and obedient to their governour. Who then should we havefor our helps and governours, if not men? Wherfore, we should beintirely subject to them, in giving them due honour and reverence, andsuch a one as shall depart from this rule: she (in mine opinion) isnot onely worthy of grievous reprehension, but also severechastisement beside. And to this exact consideration (over and abovedivers other important reasons) I am the rather induced, by theNovel which Madame Pampinea so lately reported, concerning the frowardand wilfull wife of Talano, who had a heavier punishment inflictedon her, then her Husband could devise to doe. And therefore it is myperemptory sentence, that all such women as will not be gracious,benigne and pleasing: doe justly deserve (as I have already said)rude, rough and harsh handling, as both nature, custome and lawes havecommanded.

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1.  In this determination, wrapping a mantle about her head, and lyingdowne weeping in the boats bottome, she hourely expected her finallexpiration: but it fell out otherwise, and contrary to her desperateintention, because the wind turning to the North, and blowing verygently, without disturbing the Seas a jot, they conducted the smallBoat in such sort, that after the night of her entering into it, andthe morrowes sailing untill the evening, it came within an hundreleagues of Thunis and to a strond neere a Towne called Susa. The youngDamosell knew not whether she were on the sea or land; as one, who notby any accident hapning, lifted up her head to looke about her,neither intended ever to doe. Now it came to passe, that as theboate was driven to the shore, a poore woman stood at the Sea side,washing certaine Fishermens Nets; and seeing the boate comming towardsher under saile, without any person appearing in it, she wondredthereat not a little. It being close at the shore, and she thinkingthe Fishermen to be asleepe therein: stept boldly, and looked into theboate, where she saw not any body, but onely the poore distressedDamosell, whose sorrowes having brought her now into a sound sleepe,the woman gave many cals before she could awake her, which at thelength she did, and looked very strangely about her.
2.  The Cloake is laid up by Belcolore, and Sir Simon so forward inhis affection; that (in briefe) he enjoyed what hee came for; anddeparted afterward in his light tripping Cassocke, but yet thorowby-Lanes, and no much frequented places, smelling on a Nosegay, asif hee had beene at some wedding in the Countrey, and went thuslightly without his Cloake, for his better ease. As commonly afteractions of evill, Repentance knocketh at the doore of Conscience,and urgeth a guilty remembrance, with some sence of sorrow: so wasit now with sweet Sir Simon, who survayin over all his vailes ofoffering Candles, the validity of his yearely benefits, and allcomming nothing neere the summe of (scarce halfe) sixe and twentyFlorines; he began to repent his deed of darkenesse, although it wasacted in the day-time, and considered with himselfe, by what honest(yet unsuspected meanes) hee might recover his Cloake againe, beforeit went to the Broaker, in redemption of Belcolores pawnedapparrell, and yet to send her no Florines neither.
3.  Sir (quoth shee) you have apprehended Ruggiero de Jeroly, as atheefe, and judgement of death is (as I heare) pronounced against him:but hee is wrongfully accused, and is clearly innocent of such aheinous detection. So entring into the History, she declared everycircumstance, from the originall to the end: relating truly, thatbeing her Lover, shee brought him into her Masters house, where hedranke the compounded sleepy water, and reputed for dead, she laidehim in the Chest. Afterward, she rehearsed the speeches betweene theJoyner, and him that laide claime to the Chest, giving him tounderstand thereby, how Ruggiero was taken in the Lombards house.
4、  And why should others swimme in joy,
5、  GOVERNED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF MADAM ELIZA, AND THE ARGUMENT

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网友评论(p6FXUUag74875))

  • 白沙沱 08-04

      For Lying, Loytring, Lazinesse,

  • 坎贝尔堡 08-04

      In delivering these words, he sweetly kissed and embraced her, asshe sat on the Chest wherein her husband lay: now, what they didelse beside, in recompence of the wrong received, I leave to yourimagination, as rather deserving silence, then immodest blabbing.Spinelloccio, being all this while in the Chest, hearing easily allthe words which Zeppa had uttered, the answer of his wife, as alsowhat Musicke they made over his head: you may guesse in what a case hewas, his heart being ready to split with rage, and, but that hee stoodin feare of Zeppa, he would have railde and exclaimed on his wife,as thus hee lay shut up in the Chest. But entering into betterconsideration, that so great al injury was first begun by himselfe,and Zeppa did no more, then in reason and equity he might well do(having evermore carried himselfe like a kinde neighbour and frendtowards him, without the least offer of distaste) he faithfullyresolved, to be a firmer friend to Zeppa then formerly hee had bin, ifit might be embraced and accepted.

  • 戴著平 08-04

       Within a while after, Madame Helena said to her friend. Walke withme (deare sal heart) into my Chamber, and there at a secret littlewindow, I shall shew thee what he doth, that drove thee to such asuspition of me, and we shall heare beside, what answere he willgive my maide Ancilla, whom I will send to comfort him in hiscoldnesse.

  • 基斯亚 08-04

      Spirit, Spirit, thy way,

  • 李继 08-03

    {  Still thou didst comfort me.

  • 褚时健 08-02

      Much merriment was among the Ladies, hearing this Tale ofMartellinos misfortunes, so familiarly reported by Madam Neiphila, andof the men, it was best respected by Philostratus, who sitting neerestunto Neiphila, the Queene commanded his Tale to be the next, whenpresently he began to speake thus.}

  • 乌尔善 08-02

      At the Palace they arrived in a due houre, finding the threeGentlemen at play, as they left them, to whom Madame Pampineapleasantly thus spake. Now trust me Gallants, this day wee have verycunningly beguiled you. How now? answered Dioneus, begin you firstto act, before you speake? Yes truly Sir, replyed Madame Pampinea:

  • 金峰 08-02

      Sodainly, Marquiso bethought him how to do it, and proceeded thus.All the Sergeants for Justice standing at the Church doore, hee ranwith all possible speede to the Potestates Lieutenant, and said untohim. Good my Lord Justice, helpe me in an hard case; yonder is avillaine that hath cut my purse, I desire he may bee brought beforeyou, that I may have my money againe. He hearing this, sent for adozen of the Sergeants, who went to apprehend unhappy Martellino,and recover him from the peoples fury, leading him on with them to thePalace, no meane crowds thronging after him, when they heard that hewas accused to bee a Cutpurse. Now durst they meddle no more with him,but assisted the Officers; some of them charging him in like manner,that hee had cut their purses also.

  • 徐增华 08-01

       The Lady Marquesse of Montferrat, with a Banquet of Hennes, anddivers other gracious speeches beside, repressed the fond love ofthe King of France.

  • 宋太祖 07-30

    {  Maides have best reason,

  • 何智丽 07-30

      Supposing there to finde a solemne peace:

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