0 鸿运国际娱乐手机版登录首页-APP安装下载

鸿运国际娱乐手机版登录首页 注册最新版下载

鸿运国际娱乐手机版登录首页 注册

鸿运国际娱乐手机版登录首页注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郭建华 大小:ojl3lhVD71314KB 下载:gjmSRwCb86780次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:3HJzTYLX24418条
日期:2020-08-05 18:27:15
安卓
韩梅

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The Chamber-maide, being much moved to compassion, returned to herLady, and tolde her all; she likewise pittying his distresse, andremembring shee had the key of that doore, whereby the Marquesseboth entred and returned, when he intended not to be seene of any,said to her Maide. Goe, and open the doore softly for him; we have agood supper, and none to helpe to eate it, and if he be a manlikely, we can allow him one nights lodging too. The Chamber-maide,commending her Lady for this charitable kindnesse, opened the doore,and seeing hee appeared as halfe frozen, shee said unto him. Make hastgood man, get thee into this Bath, which yet is good and warme, for myLady her selfe came but newly out of it. Whereto very gladly hecondiscended, as not tarrying to be bidden twise; finding himselfeso singularly comforted with the heate thereof, even as if hee hadbeene restored from death to life. Then the Lady sent him garments,which lately were her deceased husbands, and fitted him so aptly inall respects, as if purposely they had beene made for him.
2.  Most highly pleased was Amarigo with these glad newes, and goingto the Ambassadour Phineo, in teares excused himselfe (so well as hecould) for his severity, and craving pardon; assured him, that ifTheodoro would accept his Daughter in marriage, willingly he wouldbestow her on him. Phineo allowed his excuses to be tollerable, andsaide beside; If my Son will not marry your Daughter, then let thesentence of death be executed on him. Amarigo and Phineo being thusaccorded, they went to poore Theodoro, fearefully looking every minutewhen he should dye, yet joyfull that he had found his Father, whopresently moved the question to him. Theodoro hearing that Violentashould bee his Wife, if he would so accept her: was over come withsuch exceeding joy, as if he had leapt out of hell into Paradise;confessing, that no greater felicity could befall him, if Violenta herselfe were so well pleased as he.
3.  All wrapt up in a cloath most fine.
4.  So that Frederigo departed thence, both with the losse of his labourand supper. But a neighbour of mine, who is a woman of good yeares,told me, that both the one and other were true, as she her selfeheard, when she was a little Girle. And concerning the latteraccident, it was not to John of Lorrayne, but to another, named Johnde Nello, that dwelt at S. Peters Gate, and of the same professionas John of Lorrayne was. Wherefore (faire Ladies) it remaineth in yourowne choice, to entertain which of the two prayers you please, or bothtogether if you will: for they are of extraordinary vertue in suchstrange occurrences, as you have heeretofore heard, and (upon doubt)may prove by experience. It shall not therefore be amisse for you,to learne them both by hart, for (peradventure) they may stand youin good sted, if ever you chance to have the like occasion.
5.  But because you are so desirous to have me fettered in the chains ofwedlocke; I am contented to grant what you request. And because Iwould have no complaint made of any but my selfe, if matters shouldnot happen answerable to expectation; I will make mine owne eyes myelectors, and not see by any others sight. Giving you this assurancebefore, that if she whom I shall make choice of, be not of youhonoured and respected as your Lady and Mistresse: it will ensue toyour detriment, how much you have displeased me, to take a wife atyour request, and against mine owne will.
6.  DESIRES.

计划指导

1.  Fearing least their offence might come to open publication, theyburied it very secretly; and, before any could take notice thereof,they departed from Messina, and went to dwell in Naples, Isabellacrying and calling still for her pot of Basile, being unable to giveover mourning, dyed within a few dayes after. Thus have you heardthe hard fate of poore Lorenzo and his Isabella. Within no longwhile after, when this accident came to be publikely knowne, anexcellent ditty was composed thereof beginning thus.
2.  Having taken her sad and sorrowfull farewell of them all,accompanied onely with her Maide, and one of her Kinsmen, away shewent, attired in a Pilgrimes habit, yet well furnished with moneyand precious jewels, to avoyde all wants which might: befall her intravaile; not acquainting any one whether she went. In no place stayedshe, untill she was arrived at Florence, where happening into apoore Widdowes house, like a poore Pilgrime, she seemed well contentedtherewith. And desiring to heare some tydings of the Count, the nextday shee saw him passe by the house on horse-backe, with hiscompany. Now, albeit shee knew him well enough, yet shee demanded ofthe good old Widdow, what Gentleman he was? She made answer, that hewas a stranger there, yet a Nobleman, called Count Bertrand ofRoussillion, a very courteous Knight, beloved and much respected inthe City. Moreover, that he was farre in love with a neighbour ofhers, a young Gentlewoman, but very poore and meane in substance,yet of honest life, vertuous, and never taxed with any evill report:onely her poverty was the maine imbarment of her marriage, dwelling inhouse with her mother, who was a wise, honest, and worthy Lady.
3.  The Lady hearing these newes, and thinking she must returne againeto her poore father's house, and (perhaps) to her old occupation ofkeeping sheepe, as in her yonger dayes she had done, understandingwithall, that another woman must enjoy him, whom shee dearely lovedand honoured; you may well thinke (worthy Ladies) that her patiencewas now put to the maine proofe indeede. Neverthelesse, as with aninvincible true vertuous courage, she had outstood all the otherinjuries of Fortune; so did she constantly settle her soule, tobeare this with an undaunted countenance and behaviour.
4.  After supper, their conference lasted very long, purposely dilatedout in length, that a great part of the night might therein be wasted:when, leaving Andrea to his Chamber, and a Lad to attend, that heshould lacke nothing; she with her women went to their lodgings, andthus our Brother and supposed Sister were parted. The season thenbeing somewhat hot and soultry, Andrea put off his hose and doublet,and being in his shirt alone, layed them underneath the beds boulster,as seeming carefull of his money. But finding a provocation to thehouse of Office, he demanded of the Lad, where hee might find it;who shewed him a little doore in a corner of the Chamber, appointinghim to enter there. Safely enough he went in, but chanced to treadupon a board, which was fastened at neither, ende to the joyntswhereon it lay, being a pit-fall made of purpose, to entrap any suchcoxcombe, as would be trained to so base a place of lodging, so thatboth he and the board fell downe together into the draught; yet suchbeing his good fortune, to receive no harme in the fall (although itwas of extraordinary height) onely the filth of the place, (it beingover full) had fowly myred him.
5.  If Love were free from Jealousie,
6.  THE SECOND DAY, THE TENTH NOVELL

推荐功能

1.  When night was come, they buried him in a goodly Marble tombe,erected in a faire Chappell purposely; and for many dayes afterfollowing, it was most strange to see, how the people of the Countrycame thither on heapes, with holy Candles and other offerings, withImages of waxe fastened to the Tombe, in signe of Sacred and solemneVowes, to this new created Saint. And so farre was spread the fame andrenowne of his sanctity, devotion, and integrity of life, maintainedconstantly by the Fathers of the Convent; that if any one fell sickein neede, distresse, or adversity, they would make their Vowes to noother Saint but him: naming him (as yet to this day they do) SaintChappelet, affirming upon their Oathes, that infinite miracles werethere daily performed by him, and especially on such, as came indevotion to visit his shrine.
2.  Some other turbulent spirited man, no imprisonments, tortures,examinations, and interrogations, could have served his turne; bywhich course of proceeding, he makes the shame to be publikely knowne,which reason requireth to keepe concealed. But admit that condignevengeance were taken, it diminisheth not one tittle of the shame,neither qualifieth the peoples bad affections, who will lash out asliberally in scandal, and upon the very least babling rumor. Suchtherfore as heard the Kings words, few though they were, yet trulywise; marvelled much at them, and by long examinations amongthemselves, questioned, but came far short of his meaning; the manonely excepted whom indeed they concerned, and by whom they were neverdiscovered, so long as the King lived, neither did he dare at any timeafter, to hazard his life in the like action, under the frownes orfavour of Fortune.
3.  And if not I, what Lady else can sing,
4.  Lisana, the Daughter of a Florentine Apothecary, named BernardoPuccino, being at Palermo, and seeing Piero, King of Aragon run at theTilt; fell so affectionately enamored of him, that she languished inan extreame and long sickenesse. By her owne devise, and means of aSong, sung in the hearing of the King: he vouchsafed to visite her,and giving her a kisse, terming himselfe also to bee her Knight forever after, hee honourably bestowed her in marriage on a youngGentleman, who was called Perdicano, and gave him liberallendowments with her.
5.   When the King heard this reply, he knew well enough the occasionof his Henne dinner, as also, what vertue lay couched under heranswere; perceiving apparantly, that wanton words would prove but invaine, and such a woman was not easily to be seduced; wherefore, ashee grew enamored on her inconsiderately, so he found it bestfitting for his honour, to quench this heate with wisedome discreetly.And so, without any more words, or further hope of speeding in sounkingly a purpose, dinner being ended, by a sudden departing, hesmoothly shadowed the cause of his comming, and thanking her for thehonour shee had done him, commended her to her chaste disposition, andposted away with speede to Gennes.
6.  The lacke of these, being life and motion giving:

应用

1.  The Neighbours, both men and Women, were all very severelyincensed against Tofano, condemning him for his great fault that nightcommitted, and avouching his wife to be vertuous and honest. Withina little while, the noise passing from Neighbour to Neighbour, atthe length it came to the eares of her Kindred, who forthwith resortedthither, and hearing how sharpely the Neighbours reprehended Tofano:they tooke him, soundly bastanadoed him, and hardly left any bone ofhim unbruised. Afterward, they went into the house, tooke all suchthings thence as belonged to hir, taking hir also with them to theirdwelling, and threatning Tofano with further infliction of punishment,both for his drunkennesse, and causlesse jealousie.
2.  At the length, the invited guests being all gone, the Lady retyredthen to her chamber, attended on by none but Bajazeth himselfe, and asfamiliarly as if he had bene one of her women, shee no waycontradicting his bold intrusion, so farre had wine over-gone hersences, and prevailed against all modest bashfulnesse. These wantonembracings, strange to her that had never tasted them before, yetpleasing beyond measure, by reason of his treacherous advantage;afterward drew on many more of the ike carowsing meetings, withoutso much as thought of her passed miseries, or those more honourableand chaste respects, that ever ought to attend on Ladies.
3.  Ischia is an Iland very neere to Naples, wherein (not long since)lived a faire and lovely Gentlewoman, named Restituta, Daughter to aGentleman of the same Isle, whose name was Marino Bolgaro. A properyouth called Guion, dwelling also in a neere neighbouring Isle, calledProcida, did love her as dearly as his owne life, and she was asintimately affected towards him. Now because the sight of her washis onely comfort, as occasion gave him leave, he resorted to Ischiavery often in the day time, and as often also in the night season,when any Barke passed from Procida to Ischia; if to see nothingelse, yet to behold the walles that enclosed his Mistresse thus.
4、  SUNG IN THE HEARING OF KING PIERO, ON THE
5、  Having found her dwelling, and (like a kinde Father) being earnestlydesirous to see her; he dayly resorted nere to the house, where SirRoger Mandevile (for so was Gianettaes husband named) chauncing to seehim, being moved to compassion, because he was both poore and aged:commaunded one of his men, to take him into the house, and to give himsome foode for Gods sake, which (accordingly) the servant performed.Gianetta had divers children by her husband, the eldest being buteight yeeres of age, yet all of them so faire and comely as couldbe. As the old Count sate eating his meate in the Hall, the childrencame all about him, embracing, hugging, and making much of him, evenas if Nature had truly instructed them, that this was their aged(though poor) Grandfather, and hee as lovingly receiving these kilderelations from them, wisely and silently kept all to himselfe, withsighes, teares, and joyes intermixed together. Insomuch that thechildren would not part from him though their Tutor and Mastercalled them often, which being tolde to their Mother, shee came foorthof the neere adjoyning Parlour, and threatned to beate them, if theywould not doe what their Maister commanded them.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(p5PTulxw64974))

  • 于立霄 08-04

      So, sitting in a pretended musing a while, at length he said. Myhonourable guests, it is now more then high time, that I should doeyou such honour, as you have most justly deserved, by performing thepromise made unto you. Then calling two of his servants, he sentthem to Madame Catharina (whom he had caused to adorne her self inexcellent manner) entreating her, that she would be pleased to gracehis guests with her presence. Catharina, having deckt her child incostly habiliments, layed it in her armes, and came with theservants into the dyning Hall, and sate down (as the Knight hadappointed) at the upper end of the Table, and then Signior Gentilespake thus. Behold, worthy Gentlemen, this is the jewell which Ihave most affected, and intend to love none other in the world; be youmy judges, whether I have just occasion to doe so, or no? TheGentlemen saluting her with respective reverence, said to theKnight; that he had great reason to affect her: And viewing heradvisedly, many of them thought her to be the very same woman (asindeed she was) but that they beleeved her to be dead.

  • 海拉 08-04

      Madam, you have so straitly concured me, by urging the remembranceof her; for whose sake I am not able to deny any thing you can demand,as I am readie therein to pleasure you. But first you must promise me,that neither you, or any other person for you, shall at any timedisclose it to your Husband, untill you have seene by effect, thatwhich I have told you proveth to be true: and when you please, I wilinstruct you how your selfe shall see it. The Ladie was not a littlejoyfull to be thus satisfied in her Husbands folly, and constantlycrediting his words to be true, shee sware a solemne oath, that no onealive should ever know it. So stepping a little further aside, becauseno listening eare should heare him, thus he beganne.

  • 陈连增 08-04

       GREAT LORDS, ARE MANY TIMES RECOMPENCED, RATHER BY THEIR GOOD

  • 李佐成 08-04

      I am undone through perjury,

  • 乔希·卡斯伯特 08-03

    {  When all the people were assembled in the Church together, FriarOnyon (never distrusting any injurie offered him, or that his closecommodities had bin medled withal) began his predication, uttering athousand lies to fit his purpose. And when he came to shew the featherof the Phoenix (having first in great devotion finisht the confession)he caused two goodly torches to be lighted, and ducking downe his headthree severall times, before hee would so much as touch the Taffata,he opened it with much reverence. So soone as the Cabinet came to beseen, off went his Hood, lowly he bowed downe his body, and utteringespecial praises of the Phoenix, and sacred properties of thewonderfull Relique, the Cover of the Cabinet being lifted uppe, he sawthe same to bee full of Coales. He could not suspect his Villaineboy to do this deede, for he knew him not to be endued with so muchwit, onely hee curst him for keeping it no better, and cursthimselfe also, for reposing trust in such a careles knave, knowing himto be slothfull, disobedient, negligent, and void of all honestunderstanding or grace. Sodainly (without blushing) lest his losseshould be discerned, he lifted his lookes and hands to heaven,speaking out so loude, as every one might easily heare him, thus: Othou omnipotent providence, for ever let thy power be praised. Thenmaking fast the Cabinet againe, and turning himselfe to the people,with lookes expressing admiration, he proceeded in this manner.

  • 温晓磊 08-02

      MAKE NO PROMISE OF YEELDING TO ANY, UNDER A COMPACT OR}

  • 金庆平 08-02

      There lived sometime in the kingdome of France, a Gentleman namedIsnarde, being the Count of Roussillion: who because hee wascontinually weake, crazie, and sickly, kept a Physitian daily in hishouse, who was called Master Gerard of Narbona. Count Isnarde hadone onely Sonne, very young in yeares, yet of towardly hope, faire,comely, and of pleasing person, named Bertrand; with whom, manyother children of his age, had their education: and among them, adaughter of the fore-named Physitian, called juliet; who, even inthese tender yeares, fixed her affection upon young Bertrand, withsuch an earnest and intimate resolution, as was most admirable in soyong a Maiden, and more then many times is noted in yeares ofgreater discretion. Old Count Isnarde dying, young Bertrand fell asa Ward to the King, and being sent to Paris, remained there underhis royall custodie and protection, to no little discomfort of youngJuliet, who became greevously afflicted in minde, because she had lostthe company of Bertrand.

  • 韩男星 08-02

      Understand then, my most worthy Auditors, that there livedsometime in Millaine an Almaigne Soldiour, named Gulfardo, ofcommendable carriage in his person, and very faithfull to such as heserved, a matter not common among the Almaignes. And because he madejust repayment, to every one which lent him monies; he grew to suchespeciall credit, and was so familiar with the very best Marchants; as(manie times) he could not be so ready to borrow, as they were willingalwaies to lend him. He thus continuing in the Cittie of Millaine,fastened his affection on a verie beautifull Gentlewoman, namedMistresse Ambrosia, Wife unto a rich Merchant, who was calledSignior Gasparuolo Sagastraccio, who had good knowledge of him, andrespectively used him. Loving this Gentlewoman with greatdiscretion, without the least apprehension of her husband: he sentupon a day to entreate conference with her, for enjoying thefruition of her love, and she should find him ready to fulfillwhatsoever she pleased to command him, as, at any time he would makegood his promise.

  • 彭某 08-01

       What shall I say more? On the morrow, at the houre of mid-dayaccompanied onely with her Chamber-mayde, and without any otheralteration in opinion; shee went to the house where the Bath waspromised, and meeting there with the olde woman, demaunded of her,if Philippello were come thither as yet or no? The woman, being wellinstructed by Ricciardo, answered: Are you shee that should meetehim heere? Yes, replied Catulla. Goe in then to him (quoth thewoman) for he is not farre off before you.

  • 段江鹏 07-30

    {  Buffalmaco and Bruno hearing this, made shew of verie muchmervailing thereat, and many times maintained what Calandrino hadsaid; being well neere ready to burst with laughter; considering,how confidently he stood upon it, that he had found the wonderfulstone, and lost it by his wives speaking onely to him. But when theysaw him rise in fury once more, with intent to beat her againe: thenthey stept betweene them; affirming, That the woman had no wayoffended in this case, but rather he himself: who knowing that womencause all things to lose their vertue, had not therefore expreslycommanded her, not to be seene in his presence all that day, untill hehad made full proofe of the stones vertue. And questionles, theconsideration of a matter so availeable and important, was quite takenfrom him, because such an especiall happinesse, should not belong tohim only; but (in part) to his friends, whom he had acquaintedtherewith, drew them to the plaine with him in companie, where theytooke as much paines in serch of the stone, as possibly he did, orcould; and yet (dishonestly) he would deceive them, and beare itaway covetously, for his owne private benefit.

  • 尹豪称 07-30

      From temperate and calme speeches, they fell to frownes and ruderLanguage, which heated their blood in such violent manner, thatforgetting brotherly affection, and all respect of Parents or Friends,they drew forth their Ponyards, stabbing each other so often anddesperately, that before any in the shippe had the power or meanesto part them, both of them being very dangerously wounded, the youngerbrother fell downe dead: the elder being in little better case, byreceiving so many perilous hurts, remained (neverthelesse) living.This unhappy accident displeased the Lady very highly, seeing herselfe thus left alone, without the help or counsell of any bodie;and fearing greatly, least the anger of the two Brethrens Parentsand Friends, should now bee laide to her charge, and thereon followseverity of punishment. But the earnest entreaties of the woundedsurviver, and their arrivall at Smirna soone after, delivered him fromthe danger of death, gave some ease to her sorrow, and there withhim she went on shore.Remaining there with him in a common Inne, while he continued inthe Chirurgians cure, the fame of her singular and much admired beautywas soone spread abroad throughout all the City: and amongst the rest,to the hearing of the Prince of Ionia, who lately before (on veryurgent occasions) was come to Smyrna. This rare rumour, made himdesirous to see her, and after he had seene her, shee seemed farrefairer in his eye, then common report had noised her to be, andsuddenly grew so enamored of her, that she was the onely Idea of hisbest desires. Afterward, understanding in what manner shee was broughtthither, he devised how to make her his own, practising all possiblemeanes to accomplish it: which when the wounded Brothers Parents heardof, they not onely made tender of their willingnesse therein, but alsoimmediately sent her to him: a matter most highly pleasing to thePrince, and likewise to the Lady her selfe; because she thought now tobe freed from no meane perill, which (otherwise) the wounded Merchantsfriends might have inflicted uppon her.

提交评论