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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨林 大小:tWq6RNAD85511KB 下载:UCwMfxqb63770次
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日期:2020-08-08 23:03:03
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  For, being bereft of any future joyes,
2.  About such time after, as suted with his owne disposition, theMarquesse made publiquely knowne to his subjects, that he meant tojoyne in marriage again, with the daughter to one of the Counts ofPanago, and causing preparation to be made for a sumptuous wedding; hesent for Grizelda, and she being come, thus he spake to her. TheWife that I have made the new election of, is to arrive here withinvery few dayes, and at her first comming, I would have her to bemost honourably entertained. Thou knowest I have no women in my house,that can decke up the Chambers, and set all requisite things in dueorder, befitting for so solemne a Feast: and therefore I sent forthee, who knowing (better then any other) all the partes, provisionand goods in the house, set every thing in such order, as thou shaltthinke necessary.
3.  Gasparuolo turning to his Wife, demanded; Whether it was so, orno? She beholding the witnesse standing by, who was also present ather receyving them: durst not make deniall, but thus answered. IndeedeHusband, I received two hundred Crownes of the Gentleman, and neverremembred, to acquaint you therewith since your comming home: buthereafter I will be made no more your receiver, except I carried aquicker memory. Then saide Gasparuolo: Signior Gulfardo, I finde youalwaies a most honest Gentleman, and will be readie at any time, todoe you the like, or a farre greater kindnesse; depart at yourpleasure, and feare not the crossing of my Booke. So Gulfardo wentaway merily contented, and Ambrosia was served as she justlymerited; she paying the price of her owne leudnesse to her Husband,which she had a more covetous intent to keepe, questionlesse, notcaring how many like lustfull matches shee coulde make, to be soliberally rewarded, if this had succeeded to her minde: whereas heshewed himselfe wise and discreete, in paying nothing for hispleasure, and requiting a covetous queane in her kinde.
4.  from his very youngest yeares, brought up to this instant in myCourt; wherein thou hast given me much affliction of minde, and sooverthrowne my senses, as I cannot well imagine how I should dealewith thee. For him, whom I have this night caused to be surprized,even as he came forth of your close contrived conveyance, anddetaine as my prisoner, I have resolved how to proceed with him: butconcerning thy selfe, mine oppressions are so many and violent, as Iknow not what to say of thee. e. way, thou hast meerly murthered theunfeigned affection I bare thee, as never any father could expressemore to his childe: and then againe, thou hast kindled a most justindignation in me, by thine immodest and wilfull folly, and whereasNature pleadeth pardon for the one, yet justice standeth up againstthe other, and urgeth cruell severity against thee: neverthelesse,before I will determine upon any resolution, I come purposely first toheare thee speake, and what thou canst say for thy selfe, in a badcase, so desperate and dangerous.
5.  AND DISGRACE, RETORTING THEM ON THE BUSI-HEADED QUESTIONERS
6.  Thy happy thrall to bee.

计划指导

1.  And gave command in spight,
2.  Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.
3.  WHEREIN IS SIGNIFIED THE POWER OF LOVE, AND THE DIVERSITY OF
4.  With such indiscretion was this idle love carried, that whether itsorted to effect, or no, I know not: but the husband perceived somesuch maner of behaviour, as he could not easily digest, nor thought itfitting to endure. Whereuppon, the league of friendly amity so longcontinued, began to faile in very strange fashion, and becameconverted into deadly hatred: which yet he very cunningly concealed,bearing an outward shew of constant friendship still, but (in hisheart) he had vowed the death of Guardastagno. Nothing wanted, butby what meanes it might best be effected, which fell out to be in thismanner. A publicke joust or Tourney, was proclaimed by sound ofTrumpet throughout all France, wherewith immediately, MesserGuiglielmo Rossiglione acquainted Messer Guardastagno, entreatinghim that they might further conferre theron together, and for thatpurpose to come and visit him, if he intended to have any hand inthe businesse. Guardastagno being exceeding glad of this accident,which gave him liberty to see his Mistresse, sent answer backe bythe messenger, that on the morrow at night, he would come and sup withRossiglione; who upon this reply, projected to himselfe in whatmaner to kill him.
5.  Mother and Brethren, I am verily perswaded, that those accidentswhich he disclosed to you, hath doubtlesse (in the same manner)happened to him, and you shall heare how. Very true it is, that thisseeming honest man, to whom (in a lucklesse houre) you married me,stileth himselfe by the name of a Merchant, coveting to be soaccounted and credited, as holy in outward appearance, as aReligious Monke, and as demure in lookes, as the modestest Maide: likea notorious common drunkard, is a Taverne hunter, where making hisluxurius matches, one while with one Whore, then againe withanother; hee causeth mee every night to sit tarrying for him, evenin the same sort as you found me: sometimes till midnight, andotherwhiles till broad day light in the morning.
6.  I know thee to bee a man of judgement, deepely informed in allwell-grounded experience: thou seest what a propper, portly, andcomely man I am, how fitly my legges are answerable to my body, mylookes amiable, lovely, and of Rosie colour: beside I am a Doctor ofPhysicke, of which profession (being only most expedient) I thinke youhave not one in your Society. I have many commendable qualities in me,as, playing on divers instruments, exquisite in singing, and composingrare ditties, whereof I will instantly sing thee one. And so hebegan to sing.

推荐功能

1.  Master Doctor hearing this Discourse, and beleeving it constantly,without any further instruction or intelligence: became possessed withverie much admiration, and had the most earnest desire in the world,to know what this Travailing to Corsica might meane: entreatingBruno with very great instances, to tell him what it was, and mademany protestations never to disclose it to anie one. How now MasterDoctor? answered Bruno, What a strange motion do you make to mee? Itis too great a secret, which you desire to know, yea, a matter of mineowne ruine, and an utter expulsion out of this Worlde, withcondemnation into the mouth of Lucifer da San Gallo, if any manwhatsoever should know it from me, wherefore I pray you to urge itno more. O my deer and honest neighbour Bruno (quoth the Doctor)assure thy selfe upon my soul, that whatsoever thou revealest to me,shall be under seale from all, but onely our selves. Fie, fie MasterDoctor, answered Bruno, you are too pressing and importunate. Sositting smiling to himselfe, shaking his head, and beating his breast,as if hee were in some straunge distraction of minde, stamping withhis feete, and beating his Fiste oftentimes on the Table, at ast hestarted uppe, and spake in this manner.
2.  It came to passe, that in so great a concourse of people, asresorted thither from all parts; three of our Citizens went toTrevers, one of them being named Stechio, the second Martellino, andthe third Marquiso, all being men of such condition, as frequentedPrinces Courts, to give them delight by pleasant and counterfettedqualities. None of these men having ever beene at Trevers before,seeing how the people crowded thorow the streetes, wondered greatlythereat: but when they knew the reason why the throngs ranne on heapesin such sort together, they grew as desirous to see the Shrine, as anyof the rest. Having ordered all affaires at their lodging, Marquisosaide; It is fit for us to see this Saint, but I know not how we shallattaine thereto, because (as I have heard) the place is guarded byGermaine Souldiers, and other warlike men, commanded thither by theGovernour of this City, least any outrage should be there committed:And beside, the Church is so full of people, as we shall nevercompasse to get neere. Martellino being also as forward in desire tosee it, presently replied. All this difficulty cannot dismay me, but Iwill go to the very body of the Saint it selfe. But how? quothMarquiso. I will tell thee, answered Martellino. I purpose to go inthe disguise of an impotent lame person, supported on the one sideby thy selfe, and on the other by Stechio, as if I were not able towalke of my selfe: And you two thus sustaining me, desiring to comeneere the Saint to cure me; every one will make way, and freely giveyou leave to go on.
3.  It appeared to the whole assembly, that they had heard a matter ofmervaile, for a Lord Abbot to performe any magnificent action: buttheir admiration ceasing in silence, the King commanded Philostratusto follow next, who forthwith thus began.
4.  Ah Antigonus, me thinkes when I looke on thee, I seeme to beholdmy royall Father, and therefore mooved with the like religious zealeand charitable love, as in duty I owe unto him: I wil make known tothee, what I rather ought to conceale and hide from any person living.I know thee to be honourable, discreete, and truely wise, though Iam a fraile, simple, and weake woman, therefore I dare discover tothee, rather then any other that I know, by what strange andunexpected misfortunes I have lived so long obscurely in the world.And if in thy great and grave judgement (after the hearing of mymany miseries) thou canst any way restore me to my former estate, Ipray thee do it: but if thou perceive it impossible to be done, asearnestly likewise I entreate thee, never to reveale to any livingperson, that either thou hast seene mee, or heard any speech of me.After these words, the teares still streaming from her faire eyes, sherecounted the whole passage of her rare mishappes, even from hershipwracke in the sea of Majorica, untill that very instant houre;speaking them in such harsh manner as they hapned, and not sparing anyjot of them.
5.   Which tydings comming to the hearing of Signior Gentile, by one thatwas his endeared friend: Although (while she lived) he could neverbe gracious n her favour, yet her so sudden death did greatly grievehim, whereupon he discoursed in this sort with himselfe. DeareMadame Catharina, I am not a little sorry for thy death, although(during thy life-time) I was scarcely worthy of one kind looke: Yetnow being dead, thou canst not prohibite me, but I may robbe thee of akisse. No sooner had hee spoke the words, but it beeing then night,and taking such order, as none might know of his departure: heemounted on horsebacke, accompanied onely with one servant, andstayed no where, till hee came to the vault where the Lady was buried.Which when he had opened, with instruments convenient for the purpose,he descended downe into the vault, and kneeled downe by the Beerewhereon she lay, and in her wearing garments, according to theusuall manner; with teares trickling mainly downe his cheekes, hebestowed infinite sweet kisses on her.
6.  Thus a wanton-headed Lady, could finde no other subject to worke hermocking folly on, but a learned Scholler, of whom shee made no morerespect, then any other ordinary man. Never remembring, that suchmen are expert (I cannot say all, but the greater part of them) tohelpe the frenzie of foolish Ladies, that must injoy their loosedesires, by Negromancy, and the Divelles meanes. Let it therefore(faire Ladies) be my loving admonition to you, to detest all unwomanlymocking and scorning, but more especiallie to Schollers.

应用

1.  It fortuned that two men, who had beene abroad the same night,committing thefts and robberies together; somwhat very earlie in themorning, came to the same Cave, intending there to share and dividetheir booties, and difference happening betweene them about it, heethat was the stronger person, slew there the other, and then went awaywith the whole purchase.
2.  THE SIXT DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
3.  THE THIRD DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
4、  After she had to her first sleepe (according to the Schollersdirection) departing softly out of her chamber, she went on towardsthe ancient Tower, standing hard by the river of Arno, looking everyway heedfully about hir, least she should be spied by any person.But perceiving hir selfe to be so secure as she could desire;putting off all her garments, she hid them in a small brake of bushes:afterward, holding the Image in hir hand, seven times she bathd hirbody in the river, and then returned with it to the Tower. TheScholler, who at the nights closing up of day, had hid himselfeamong the willowes and other trees, which grew very thick about theTower, saw both hir going and returning from the River, and as shepassed thus naked by him, he plainly perceyved, that the nightsobscurity could not cloud the delicate whitenes of hir body, butmade the Starres themselves to gaze amorously on her, even as ifthey were proud to behold her bathing, and (like so many twinklingTapers) shewed hir in emulation of another Diana. Now, whatconflicts this sight caused in the mind of our Scholler, one while,quenching his hatefull spleen towards hir, al coveting to imbrace apiece of such perfection: another while, thinking it a purchase fitfor one of Cupids soldiers, to seize and surprize hir uppon so fairean advantage, none being to yeild her rescue: in the fiery triall ofsuch temptations, I am not able to Judge, or to say, what resistanceflesh and blood could make, being opposed with such a sweet enemy.
5、  At length it came to passe, that either through their owneindiscreete carriage, or jelous suspition in some others: it wasespied by one of the Sisters, both the Gentlemans comming anddeparting, yet unknowne to him or Isabella. The saide Sister,disclosing the same to two or three more: they agreed together, toreveale it to the Lady Abbesse, who was named Madame Usimbalda, a holyand devout Lady, in common opinion of all the Nunnes, and whosoeverelse knew her.

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  • 苏荣 08-07

      ESPECIALL HONOURABLE VERTUE, PERSEVERING AND DWELLING IN A

  • 张万英 08-07

      Loving friends, if you were pleased to follow mine advise, wee threewill quickely be the richest men in Florence; because, byinformation from a Gentleman (well deserving to be credited) on thePlaine of Mugnone: there is a precious stone to be found, whichwhosoever carrieth it about him, walketh invisible, and is not to beseene by any one. Let us three be the first men to goe and finde it,before any other heare thereof, and goe about it, and assure ourselves that we shall finde it, for I know it (by discription) so sooneas I see it. And when wee have it, who can hinder us from bearing itabout us? Then will we goe to the Tables of our Bankers, or moneyChangers, which we see daily charged with plenty of gold and silver,where we may take so much as wee list, for they (nor any) are ableto descrie us. So, (in short time) shall wee all be wealthy, neverneeding to drudge any more, or paint muddy walles, as hitherto we havedone; and, as many of our poore profession are forced to doe.

  • 花藤 08-07

       Not long since, there lived in Naples, an honest meane man, whodid take to Wife, a fayre and lustie young Woman, being namedPeronella.-He professing the Trade of a Mason, and shee Carding andSpinning, maintained themselves in a reasonable condition, abating andabounding as their Fortunes served. It came to passe, that acertayne young man, well observing the beauty and good parts ofPeronella, became much addicted in affection towardes her: and byhis often and secret sollicitations, which he found not to beunkindely entertayned; his successe proved answerable to his hope,no unindifferencie appearing in their purposes, but where her estateseemed weakest, his supplies made an addition of more strength.

  • 周韵 08-07

      That first enflam'd my heart with holy fire.

  • 方有胜 08-06

    {  Saladine and his friends, being conquerd with such potentperswasions, and already dismounted from their horses, saw that alldeniall was meerly in vaine: and therefore thankfully condiscending(after some few ceremonious complements were over-past) theGentlemen conducted them to their Chambers, which were mostsumptuously prepared for them, and having laid aside their ridinggarments, being a little re reshed with Cakes and choice Wines; theydescended into the dining Hall, the pompe whereof I am not able toreport.

  • 董永 08-05

      Sinne and shame can never be so closely carryed, or clouded with thegreatest cunning; but truth hath a loop-light whereby to discoverit, even when it supposeth it selfe in the surest safety. For, onthe very day of her detiverance, at such time as the Mother, andsome few friends (sworne to secrecy) were about the businesse, SigniorAmarigo, having beene in company of other Gentlemen, to flye his Hawkeat the River, upon a sudden, (but very unfortunately, albeit hee wasalone by himselfe) stept into his Farm-house, even to the next roomewhere the women were, and heard the newborne Babe to cry, whereatmarvelling not a little, he called for his Wife, to know what youngchilde cryed in his House. The Mother, amazed at his strange commingthither, which never before he had used to doe, and pittying thewofull distresse of her Daughter, which now could bee no longercovered, revealed what happened to Violenta. But he, being nothingso rash in beliefe, as his Wife was, made answere, that it wasimpossible for his Daughter to be conceived with childe, because henever observed the least signe of love in her to any man whatsoever,and therefore he would be satisfied in the truth, as shee expected anyfavour from him, or else there was no other way but death.}

  • 陈小虎 08-05

      The Marquesse of Saluzzo, named Gualtiero, being constrained bythe importunate solliciting of his Lords, and other inferiourpeople, to joyne himselfe in marriage; tooke a woman according tohis owne liking, called Grizelda, she being the daughter of a pooreCountriman, named Janiculo, by whom he had two children, which hepretended to be secretly murdered. Afterward, they being grown toyeres of more stature, and making shew of taking in marriage anotherwife, more worthy of his high degree and Calling: made a seemingpublique liking of his owne daughter, expulsing his wife Grizeldapoorely from him. But finding her incomparable patience; moredearely (then before) hee received her into favour againe, brought herhome to his owne Pallace, where (with her children) hee caused her andthem to be respectively honoured, in despight of all her adverseenemies.

  • 洪显智 08-05

      Lionello, who had heard all the forepassed discourse, which shee haddelivered to her Husband Beltramo, came creeping forth amazedly (asone now very fearefully affrighted indeede) from under the furtherside of the bedde, and Beltramo saide to him, What a quarrell wasthis, between thee and furious Lambertuccio? Not any at all Sir,replyed Lionello, to my knowledge, which verily perswadeth me; thateither he is not well in his wits, or else he mistaketh me for someother; because, so soone as he saw me on the way, somewhat neere tothis your Castle, he drew forth hi Sword, and swearing an horribleoath, said. Traitor thou art a dead man. Upon these rough words, Istayed not to question the occasion of mine offending him: but fiedfrom him so fast as possibly I could; but confesse my selfe(indeede) over-bold, by presuming into your Ladies bed chamber,which yet (equalled with her mercie) hath bin the onely meanes at thistime, of saving my life She hath done like a good Lady, answeredBeltramo, and I do verie much commend her for it. But, recollect thydismayed spirits together, for I will see thee safely securedlience, afterward, looke to thy selfe so well as thou canst. Dinnerbeing immediately made ready, and they having merrily feastedtogether: he bestowed a good Gelding on Lionello, and rode alongwith him to Florence, where he left him quietly in his owne lodging.The selfe-same Evening (according as Isabella had given enstruction)Lionello conferred with Lambertuccio: and such an agreement passedbetweene them, that though some rough speeches were noised abroad,to set the better colour on the businesse; yet al matters were socleanly carried, that Beltramo never knew this queint deceitfullpolicy of his Wife.

  • 王广亚 08-04

       Then, without speaking any one word, let him take you foorth ofthe grave, and bring you thence (insted of Scannadio) to hir house:where she will give you gentle welcome, and disappoint her Kinsmanin his hope, by making you Lord of her, and all that is hers, asafterward shall plainly appeare. If he say he wit do it, it is as muchas I desire: but if hee trifle and make deniall, then boldly tell him,that he must refraine all places wheresoever I am, and forbeare tosend me any more Letters, or messages.

  • 贡确 08-02

    {  Many other speeches past betweene them in a short while, but inthe end, Chichibio, because hee would not have his MistresseBrunetta angrie with him; cut away one of the Cranes legges from thespit, and gave it to her to eate. Afterward, when the Fowle was servedup to the Table before Messer Currado, who had invited certainstrangers his friends to sup with him, wondering not a little, hecalled for Chichibio his Cook; demanding what was become of the Cranesother legge? Whereto the Venetian (being a lyar by Nature) sodainelyanswered: Sir, Cranes have no more but one legge each Bird. MesserCurrado, growing verie angry, replyed. Wilt thou tell me, that a Cranehath no more but one legge? Did I never see a Crane before this?Chichibio persisting resolutely in his deniall, saide. Beleeve me Sir,I have told you nothing but the truth, and when you please, I wil makegood my wordes, by such Fowles as are living.

  • 陈爽 08-02

      Alessandro being risen againe (although he was cloathed inScannadioes Garments, which were long and too bigge for him) fleddeaway also as Rinuccio did. All which Madame Francesca easily discernedby helpe of the Watchmens Lanthorne, and how Rinuccio carriedAlessandro on his backe, beeing attired in the Garments ofScannadio: whereat she mervailed not a litle, as also the greatboldnesse of them both. But in the midst of her mervailing, shelaughed very heartily, when she saw the one let the other fall, andboth to runne away so manfully. Which accident pleasing her beyond allcomparison, and applauding her good Fortune, to bee so happilydelivered from their daily mollestation: she betooke her selfe tohir Chamber with the Maide, avouching solemnly to her, that(questionlesse) they both affected her dearely, having undertaken sucha straunge imposition, and verie neere brought it to a finallconclusion.

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