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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:蒋家骏 大小:zbeOnc6e19008KB 下载:fkiheyXX85944次
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日期:2020-08-06 06:33:00
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The Scholler, whose envious spleene was swolne very great, inremembring such a malicious cruelty exercised on him, beholding toweepe and make such lamentations; found a fierce conflict in histhoughts, betweene content and pitty. It did not a little joy andcontent him, that the revenge which he so earnestly desired tocompasse, was now by him so effectually inflicted. And yet (in meerehumanity) pitty provoked him, to commisserate the Ladies distressedcondition: but clemency being over-weake to withstand his rigor,thus he replied. Madam Helena, if mine entreaties (which, to speaketruly, I never knew how to steepe in tears, nor wrap up my words insugar Candie, so cuningly as you women know how to do) could haveprevailed, that miserable night, when I was well-neere frozen to deathwith cold, and meerly buried with snow in your Court, not havinganie place of rescue or shelter; your complaints would now the moreeasily over-rule me. But if your honor in estimation, bee now moreprecious to you then heretofore, and it seemeth so offensive tostand there naked: convert your perswasions and prayers to him, inwhose armes you were that night imbraced, both of your triumphing inmy misery, when poor I, trotted about your Court, with the teethquivering in my head, and beating mine armes about my body, finding nocompassion in him, or you. Let him bring thee thy Garments, let himcome helpe thee down with the Ladder, and let him have the care ofthine honour, on whom thou hast bene so prodigall heretofore inbestowing it, and now hast unwomanly throwne thy selfe in perill,onely for the maintenance of thine immodest desires.
2.  Sinne and shame can never be so closely carryed, or clouded with thegreatest cunning; but truth hath a loop-light whereby to discoverit, even when it supposeth it selfe in the surest safety. For, onthe very day of her detiverance, at such time as the Mother, andsome few friends (sworne to secrecy) were about the businesse, SigniorAmarigo, having beene in company of other Gentlemen, to flye his Hawkeat the River, upon a sudden, (but very unfortunately, albeit hee wasalone by himselfe) stept into his Farm-house, even to the next roomewhere the women were, and heard the newborne Babe to cry, whereatmarvelling not a little, he called for his Wife, to know what youngchilde cryed in his House. The Mother, amazed at his strange commingthither, which never before he had used to doe, and pittying thewofull distresse of her Daughter, which now could bee no longercovered, revealed what happened to Violenta. But he, being nothingso rash in beliefe, as his Wife was, made answere, that it wasimpossible for his Daughter to be conceived with childe, because henever observed the least signe of love in her to any man whatsoever,and therefore he would be satisfied in the truth, as shee expected anyfavour from him, or else there was no other way but death.
3.  Being arrived there long before his limmitted time, he called theMerchants together, who were present at the passed words and wager;avouching before Bernardo, that he had won his five thousandDuckets, and performed the taske he undertooke. To make good hisprotestation, first he described the forme of the Chamber, the curiouspictures hanging about it, in what manner the bed stood, and everycircumstance else beside. Next he shewed the severall things, which hebrought away thence with him, affirming that he had received them ofher selfe. Bernardo confessed, that his description of the Chamber wastrue, and acknowledged moreover, that these other things did belong tohis Wife: But (quoth he) this may be gotten, by corrupting someservant of mine, both for intelligence of the Chamber, as also ofthe Ring, Purse, and what else is beside; all which suffice not to winthe wager, without some other more apparant and pregnant token. Introth, answered Ambroginolo, me thinkes these should serve forsufficient proofes; but seeing thou art so desirous to know more: Iplainely tell thee, that faire Genevra thy Wife, hath a small roundwart upon her left pappe, and some few little golden haires growingthereon.
4.  Bartolomea smiled to her self and without suffering him to proceedany further in speech, returned him this answere. I would have youto understand Sir, that my memory is not so oblivious, but I knowyou to be Signior Ricciardo di Cinzica, and my husband by name ortitle, but during the time that I was with you, it very ill appearedthat you had any knowledge of me. For if you had bene so wise andconsiderate, as (in your own judgement) the world reputed you to be,you could not be voide of so much apprehension, but did apparantlyperceive, that I was yong, fresh, and cheerefully disposed; and so (byconsequent) meet to know matters requisite for such young women,beside allowance of food and garments, though bashfulnesse and modestyforbid to utter it. But if studying the Lawes were more welcome to youthen a wife, you ought not to have maried, and you loose the worthyreputation of a judge, when you fall from that venerable profession,and make your selfe a common proclaimer of feasts and fasting dayes,lenten seasons, vigils, and solemnities due to Saints, which prohibitethe houshold conversation of husbands and wives.
5.  And Egges laide in mine owne Hennes nest,
6.  MADAM PHILOMENA: CONCERNING SUCH MEN OR WOMEN, AS (IN DIVERS

计划指导

1.  THE NINTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
2.  Poore Renicro, our over-credulous Scholler, whose vehement affectionto Madame Helena, so hood-winkt the sight of his understanding, ashe could not be distrustfull of any guilt; returned this answere toAncilla. Say to your Lady that I am bound in duty, to attend thegood houre of her leisure, without so much as the very leastprejudicate conceite in me: Neverthelesse, entreat her, to let itbee so soone as she possibly may, because here is miserable walking,and it beginneth againe to snow extreamely. Ancilla making fast theCasement, went presently to bed; when Helena spake thus to her amorousfriend. What saist thou now? Doest thou thinke that I loved him, asthou wast afraid of? If I did, he should never walke thus in the frostand snow. So, away went they likewise from their close gazingwindow, and spent wanton dalliances together, laughing, and deriding(with many bitter taunts and jests) the lamentable condition ofpoore Reniero.
3.  On the morrow, after dinner, arming himselfe, and two more of hisservants with him, such as he had solemnly sworne to secrecy, hemounted on horsebacke, and rode on about a mile from his owneCastle, where he lay closely ambushed in a Wood, through whichGuardastagno must needs passe. After he had stayed there some twohoures space and more, he espyed him come riding with two of hisattendants, all of them being unarmed, as no way distrusting anysuch intended treason. So soone as he was come to the place, wherehe had resolved to do the deed; hee rushed forth of the ambush, andhaving a sharpe Lance readily charged in his rest, ran mainly athim, saying: False villaine, thou art dead. Guardastagno, havingnothing wherewith to defend himselfe, nor his servants able to givehim any succour; being pierced quite through the body with theLance, downe he fell dead to the ground, and his men (fearing the likemisfortune to befall them) gallopped mainely backe againe to theirLords Castle, not knowing them who had thus murthered their Master, byreason of their armed disguises, which in those martiall times wereusually worne.
4.  CIVILL DISCRETION
5.  CIVILL DISCRETION
6.  After some small familiar Discourse passing betweene them, Gabriellodemanded of her, upon what occasion shee denyed his comming thitherthe night before, and by such a sodaine unexpected admonition?Andreana told him, that it was in regard of a horrid Dreame, wherewithher soule was perplexed the precedent night, and doubt what mightensue thereon. Gabriello hearing this, began to smile, affirming toher, that it was an especial note of folly, to give any credit to idledreames: because (oftentimes) they are caused by excesse of feeding,and continually are observed to be meere lyes. For (quoth he) if I hadany superstitious beleefe of Dreames, I should not then have comehither now: yet not so much as being dismayed by your dreame, butfor another of mine owne, which I am the more willing to acquaintyou withall.

推荐功能

1.  To decke up their Bowers,
2.  Can I never finde
3.  Overcome with excesse of joy, which made the teares to trickle downehis cheekes, he proffered to embrace and kisse the Maide: but sherefusing his kindnesse, because (as yet) she knew no reason for it,hee turned himselfe to Jacomino, saying. My deare brother andfriend, this Maide is my Daughter, and my House was the same whichGuidotto spoyled, in the generall havocke of our City, and thence hecarried this childe of mine, forgotten (in the fury) by my Wife herMother. But happy was the houre of his becomming her Father, andcarrying her away with him; for else she had perished in the fire,because the House was instantly burnt downe to the ground. TheMayden hearing his words, observing him also to be a man of yeeres andgravity: she beleeved what he saide, and humbly submitted her selfe tohis kisses and embraces, even as instructed thereto by instinct ofnature. Bernardino instantly sent for his wife, her owne Mother, hisdaughters, sonnes, and kindred, who being acquainted with thisadmirable accident, gave her most gracious and kinde welcome, hereceiving her from Jacomino as his childe, and the legacies whichGuidotto had left her.
4.  It chanced within some few months after, that the kinred of Gisippuscame to see him, and (before Titus) avised him to marriage, and with ayong Gentlewoman of singular beauty, derived from a most noble housein Athens, and she named Sophronia, aged about fifteen years. Thismariage drawing neere, Gisippus on a day, intreated Titus to walkalong with him thither, because (as yet) he had not seene her.Commingto the house, and she sitting in the midst betweene them, Titusmaking himselfe a considerator of beauty, and especially on hisfriends behalfe; began to observe her very judicially, and everypart of her seemed so pleasing in his eie, that giving them al aprivat praise, yet answerable to their due deserving; he becam soenflamed with affection to her, as never any lover could bee moreviolentlie surprized, so sodainly doth beauty beguile our best senses.
5.   Leaving off all further talke, because now it was about midnight,they went to the great Church, where finding their enterance to beeasie: they approached neere the Tombe, which was very great, beingtall of Marble, and the cover-stone weighty, yet with crowes of yronand other helps, they raised it so high, that a man might withoutperill passe into it. Now began they to question one another, which ofthe three should enter into the Tombe. Not I, said the first; sosaid the second: No nor I, answered Andrea. Which when the other twoheard, they caught fast hold of him, saying. Wilt not thou goe intothe Tombe? Be advised what thou sayest, for, if thou wilt not goein: we will so beat thee with one of these yron crowes, that thoushalt never goe out of this Church alive.
6.  AVAILABLE IN LOVE

应用

1.  For, being bereft of any future joyes,
2.  DREAMES DO NOT ALWAYES FALL OUT TO BE LEASINGS
3.  Ischia is an Iland very neere to Naples, wherein (not long since)lived a faire and lovely Gentlewoman, named Restituta, Daughter to aGentleman of the same Isle, whose name was Marino Bolgaro. A properyouth called Guion, dwelling also in a neere neighbouring Isle, calledProcida, did love her as dearly as his owne life, and she was asintimately affected towards him. Now because the sight of her washis onely comfort, as occasion gave him leave, he resorted to Ischiavery often in the day time, and as often also in the night season,when any Barke passed from Procida to Ischia; if to see nothingelse, yet to behold the walles that enclosed his Mistresse thus.
4、  Continuing thus a longer while then otherwise he would have done,because his lying in the bare Chest was somewhat uneasie andpainfull to him; turning divers times on the one side, and then asoften againe on the other, coveting still for ease, yet could notfinde any: at length, he thrust his backe so strongly against theChests side, that (it standing on an un-even ground) it began tototter, and after fell downe. In which fall, it made so loud anoise, as the women (lying in the beds standing by) awaked, and wereso overcome with feare, that they had not the power to speake oneword. Ruggiero also being affrighted with the Chests fall, andperceiving how by that meanes it was become open, he thought itbetter, least some other sinister fortune should befall him, to beat open liberty, then inclosed up so strictly. And because he knew notwhere he was, as also hoping to meete with his Mistresse; he wentall about groping in the darke, to find either some staires ordoore, whereby to get forth.
5、  Isabella, living in expectation of his returne, and perceiving hisstay to her was so offensive long: made many demands to herBrethren, into what parts they had sent him, that his tarrying wasso quite from all wonted course. Such was her importunate speechesto them, that they taking it very discontentedly, one of them returnedher this frowning answer. What is your meaning Sister, by so manyquestionings after Lorenzo? What urgent affaires have you with him,that makes you so impatient upon his absence? If hereafter you makeany more demands for him, we shall shape you such a reply, as willbe but little to your liking. At these harsh words, Isabella fell intoabundance of teares, where-among she mingled many sighes andgroanes, such as were able to overthrow a farre stronger constitution:so that, being full of feare and dismay, yet no way distrusting herbrethrens cruell deede; she durst not question any more after him.

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网友评论(8UWvUIOy82015))

  • 杰兰特 08-05

      According as she was instructed by her Mistresse, she fell at thefeete of Master Doctor, desiring him to pardon a great error,whereby she had over-much offended him. As how? said Master Doctor. Inthis manner (quoth the Maide) and thus proceeded. You are not ignorantSir, what a lewde liver Ruggiero de Jeroly is, and notwithstanding allhis imperfections, how deerely I love him, as he protesteth the liketo me, and thus hath our love continued a yeere, and more. You beinggone to Malfy, and your absence granting me apt opportunity, forconference with so kinde a friend; I made the bolder, and gave himentrance into your house, yea even into mine owne Chamber, yet freefrom any abuse, neither did he (bad though he be) offer any. Thirstyhe was before his comming thither, either by salt meat, or distempereddiet, and I being unable to fetch him wine or water, by reason myMistresse sat in the Hall, seriously talking with her Sisters;remembred, that I saw a violl of Water standing in your ChamberWindow, which he drinking quite off, I set it empty in the placeagaine. I have heard your discontentment for the said Water, andconfesse my fault to you therein: but who liveth so justly, withoutoffending at one time or other? And I am heartily sory for mytransgression; yet not so much for the water, as the hard fortune thathath followed thereon; because thereby Ruggiero is in danger to losehis life, and all my hopes are utterly lost. Let me entreat youtherefore (gentle Master) first to pardon me, and then to grant mepermission, to succour my poore condemned friend, by all the bestmeanes I can devise.

  • 涂端玉 08-05

      A modest yong maiden named Lagina, following the same profession,and being an intimate familiar friend, Simonida tooke along in hercompany, and came to the Garden appointed by Pasquino; where she foundhim readily expecting her comming, and another friend also with him,called Puccino (albeit more usually tearmed Strambo) a secretwell-willer to Lagina, whose love became the more furthered by hisfriendly meeting. Each Lover delighting in his hearts chosenMistresse, caused them to walke alone by themselves, as thespaciousnesse of the Garden gave them ample liberty: Puccino withhis Lagina in one part, and Pasquino with his Simonida in another. Thewalke which they had made choise of, was by a long and goodly bed ofSage, turning and returning by the same bed their conference ministredoccasion, and as they pleased to recreate themselves, affecting ratherto continue still there, then in any part of the Garden.

  • 陈培铭 08-05

       To ease me of such sharpe afflictions,

  • 章泽天 08-05

      Upon day, performed with great and magnificent Triumph, there wasnot a corner in the Brethrens houses, but it sung joy in the highestkey. Lysimachus, after he had ordred all things as they ought to be,and the houre for dispat approached neere; hee made a division inthree parts, of Chynon, his followers, and his owne friends, being allwell armed under their outward habites. Having first used someencouraging speeches, for more resolute prosecution of the enterprize,hee sent troope secretly to the Port, that they might not beehindred of going aboord the ship, when the urgent necessity shouldrequire it. Passing with the other two traines of Pasimondo, he leftthe one at the doore, that such as were in the house, might not shutthem up fast, and so impeach their passage forth. Then with Chynon,and the third band of Confederates, he ascended the staires up intothe Hall, where he found the Brides with store of Ladies andGentlewomen, all sitting in comely order at Supper. Rushing in roughlyamong the attendants, downe they threw the Tables, and each of themlaying hold of his Mistris, delivered them into the hands of theirfollowers, commanding that they should bee carried aboord the ship,for avoiding of further inconveniences.

  • 卡特彼勒 08-04

    {  WHEREBY IS DECLARED, THAT SUCH AS KEEPE MANY HONEST SEEMING

  • 廖芷晴 08-03

      THE SECOND DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL}

  • 张文汉 08-03

      Sophronia, thinking her selfe to be the maried wife of Gisippus, was(indeed) the wife of Titus Quintus Fulvius, and departed thence withhim to Rome. Within a while after, Gisippus also came thither invery poore condition, and thinking that he was despised by Titus, grewweary of his life, and confessed that he had murdred a man, with fulintent to die for the fact. But Titus taking knowledge of him, anddesiring to save the life of Gisippus, charged himself to have donethe bloody deed. Which the murderer himself (standing then among themultitude) seeing, truly confessed the deed. By meanes whereof, allthree were delivered by the Emperor Octavius; and Titus gave hisSister in mariage to Gisippus, giving them also the most part of hisgoods and inheritances.

  • 杜恒强 08-03

      Messer Geri well noting his behaviour, and observing the veriesame course in him two mornings together; on the third day (as hewas drinking) he said unto him. Well done Cistio, what, is it good, orno? Cistio starting up, forthwith replyed; Yes Sir, the wine is goodindeed, but how can I make you to beleeve me, except you taste ofit? Messer Geri, eyther in regard of the times quality, or by reasonof his paines taken, perhaps more then ordinary, or else, becausehee saw Cistio had drunke so sprightly, was very desirous to tasteof the Wine, and turning unto the Ambassadors, in merriment hesaide. My Lords, me thinks it were not much amisse, if we tooke ataste of this honest mans Wine, perhaps it is so good, that we shallnot neede to repent our labour.

  • 宋小兵 08-02

       Ravenna being a very ancient City in Romania, there dwelt sometime agreat number of worthy Gentlemen, among whom I am to speake of onemore especially, named Anastasio, descended from the Family of theHonesti, who by the death of his Father, and an Unckle of his, wasleft extraordinarily abounding in riches, and growing to yearesfitting for marriage, (as young Gallants are easily apt enough todo) he became enamored of a very bountifull Gentlewoman, who wasDaughter to Signior Paulo Traversario, one of the most ancient andnoble Families in all the Countrey. Nor made he any doubt, but byhis meanes and industrious endeavour, to derive affection from heragaine; for he carried himselfe like a brave-minded Gentleman,liberall in his expences, honest and affable in all his actions, whichcommonly are the true notes of a good nature, and highly to becommended in any man. But, howsoever Fortune became his enemy, theselaudable parts of manhood did not any way friend him, but ratherappeared hurtfull to himselfe: so cruell, unkind, and almost meerelysavage did she shew her selfe to him; perhaps in pride of her singularbeauty, or presuming on her nobility by birth, both which are ratherblemishes, then ornaments in a woman, especially when they be abused.

  • 福光南 07-31

    {  Now, notwithstanding the actions of Calandrino have beeneindifferently canvazed among us; yet, remembring what Philostratus notlong since saide, That they intended to nothing more then matter ofmirth: I presume the boldlier, to report another Novell of him, besidethem already past. And, were I willing to conceale the truth, andcloath it in more circumstantiall maner: I could make use ofcontrary names, and paint it in a poeticall fiction, perhaps moreprobable, though not so pleasing. But because wandring from thetruth of things, doth much diminish (in relatic the delight of thehearers: I will build boldly on my fore-alledged reason, and tel youtruly how it hapned.

  • 郭永平 07-31

      Having considered with her selfe, what course was best to beobserved in this case; uppon a day apt and convenient, she went to theConvent where he kept, and having caused him to be called, shee toldhim, that if his leysure so served, very gladly would she beconfessed, and onely had made her choice of him. The holy man seeingher to be a Gentlewoman (as indeed she was) willingly heard her; andwhen she had confessed what she could, she had yet another matter toacquaint him withall, and thereupon thus she began.

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