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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:崔贞媛 大小:01IYyqRh11375KB 下载:cu7Fr3U123048次
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日期:2020-08-08 03:24:34
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  To cheare my long dismay:
2.  Then began he to make a dreadful kinde of noise, stamping andtrampling with his feete, passing backe againe to Santa Maria dellaScala, and to Prato d'Ognissanti, where hee met with Bruno, who wasconstrained to forsake him, because he could not refraine from lowdeLaughter, then both together went backe once more, to see how thePhysitian would behave himselfe, being so sweetely embrued.
3.  Newes came to Liparis, not onely by one, but many more beside,that all those which departed thence in the small Barke withMartuccio, were drowned in the Sea, and not a man escaped. WhenConstance, heard these unwelcome tydings (who was exceeding full ofgreefe, for his so desperate departure) she wept and lamentedextraordinarily, desiring now rather to dye, then live any longer. Yetshe had not the heart, to lay any violent hand on her selfe, butrather to end her dayes by some new kinde of necessity. Anddeparting privately from her Fathers house, she went to the Port orHaven, where (by chance) she found a small Fisher-boate, lying distantfrom the other vessels, the owners whereof being all gone on shore,and it well furnished with Masts, Sailes, and Oares, she entred intoit; and putting forth the Oares, being somewhat skilfull in sayling,(as generally all the Women of that Island are) she so well guided theSailes, Rudder, and Oares, that she was quickly farre off from theLand, and soly remained at the mercy of the windes. For thus she hadresolved with her selfe, that the Boat being uncharged, and withouta guide, would either be overwhelmed by the windes, or split in peecesagainst some Rocke; by which meanes she could [not] escape althoughshe would, but (as it was her desire) must needs be drowned.
4.  If gallant youth
5.  From temperate and calme speeches, they fell to frownes and ruderLanguage, which heated their blood in such violent manner, thatforgetting brotherly affection, and all respect of Parents or Friends,they drew forth their Ponyards, stabbing each other so often anddesperately, that before any in the shippe had the power or meanesto part them, both of them being very dangerously wounded, the youngerbrother fell downe dead: the elder being in little better case, byreceiving so many perilous hurts, remained (neverthelesse) living.This unhappy accident displeased the Lady very highly, seeing herselfe thus left alone, without the help or counsell of any bodie;and fearing greatly, least the anger of the two Brethrens Parentsand Friends, should now bee laide to her charge, and thereon followseverity of punishment. But the earnest entreaties of the woundedsurviver, and their arrivall at Smirna soone after, delivered him fromthe danger of death, gave some ease to her sorrow, and there withhim she went on shore.Remaining there with him in a common Inne, while he continued inthe Chirurgians cure, the fame of her singular and much admired beautywas soone spread abroad throughout all the City: and amongst the rest,to the hearing of the Prince of Ionia, who lately before (on veryurgent occasions) was come to Smyrna. This rare rumour, made himdesirous to see her, and after he had seene her, shee seemed farrefairer in his eye, then common report had noised her to be, andsuddenly grew so enamored of her, that she was the onely Idea of hisbest desires. Afterward, understanding in what manner shee was broughtthither, he devised how to make her his own, practising all possiblemeanes to accomplish it: which when the wounded Brothers Parents heardof, they not onely made tender of their willingnesse therein, but alsoimmediately sent her to him: a matter most highly pleasing to thePrince, and likewise to the Lady her selfe; because she thought now tobe freed from no meane perill, which (otherwise) the wounded Merchantsfriends might have inflicted uppon her.
6.  Know then my learned and judicious Doctor, that it is not longtime since, when there lived in this Citie of ours, a man veryexcellent in the Art of Nigromancie, who named himselfe Michale Scoto,because he was a Scottishman borne, of many woorthy Gentlemen (veryfew of them being now living) hee was much honoured and respected.When he grew desirous to depart from hence, upon their earnestmotion and entreaty; he left here two of his Schollers behinde him,men of absolute skill and experience: giving them especial chargeand command, to do all possible services they could devise, forthose Gentlemen who had so highly honoured him. The two famousSchollers, were very helpefull to those Gentlemen, in divers oftheir amorous occasions, and verie many other matters besides.

计划指导

1.  Then felt my heart such hels of heavy woes,
2.  Honest Friends, neither desire of booty, nor hatred to you, didoccasion my departure from Cyprus, thus to assaile you with drawneweapons: but that which hereto hath most mooved me, is a matter highlyimporting to me, and very easie for you to grant, and so enjoy yourpresent peace. I desire to have faire Iphigenia from you, whom Ilove above all other Ladies living, because I could not obtaine her ofher father, to make her my lawfull wife in marriage. Love is theground of my instant Conquest, and I must use you as my mortallenemies, if you stand upon any further tearmes with me, and do notdeliver her as mine owne: for your Pasimondo, must not enjoy what ismy right, first by vertue of my love, and now by Conquest: Deliver hertherefore, and depart hence at your pleasure.
3.  Being thus over-swayed with her proud opinion, she would no longerbe embraced or regarded by him in any manner, saving only becauseshe could not refuse him, but would find some other for her bettersatisfaction, who might seeme more worthy of her respect, then theDraper her Husband did. Heereupon shee fell so deepe in love with averie honest man of our City also, and of indifferent yeeres, aswhat day shee saw him not, shee could take no rest the nightensuing. The man himselfe knew nothing hereof, and therefore was themore carelesse: and she being curious, nice, yet wisely considerate,durst not let him understand it, neither by any womans closeconveyed message, nor yet by Letters, as fearing the perils whichhappen in such cases. But her eye observing his dayly walkes andresorts, gave her notice of his often conversing with a religiousFriar, who albeit he was a fat and corpulent man, yet notwithstanding,because he seemed to leade a sanctimonious life, and was reported tobe a most honest man, she perswaded her selfe, that he might be thebest meanes betweene her and her friend.
4.  Alas! why live I then?
5.  Frederigo, who was no meane man in his Mistresses favor, andtherefore these private meetings the more welcome to him; received asummons or assignation from her, to be there on such a night, when hirhusband had no intent of comming thither. There they supped merrilytogether, and (no doubt) did other things, nothing appertaining to ourpurpose, she both acquainting, and well instructing him, in a dozen(at the least) of her Husbands devout prayers. Nor did shee make anyaccount, or Frederigo either, that this should be the last time oftheir meeting, because (indeede) it was not the first: and therforethey set downe an order and conclusion together (because theChambermaide must be no longer the messenger) in such manner as youshall heare.
6.  The time is come, that I may no longer continue heere, becausePublius my Father is dead, and I must needs returne to Rome, whereforebeing minded to take Sophronia thither with mee, I was the morewilling to acquaint you therewith, as also what else I have said,which otherwise had still beene concealed from you. Nor can you buttake it in good part, if you be wise, and rest well contented withwhat is done: considering, if I had any intention eyther to deceive,or otherwise wrong you, I could have basely left her, and made ascorne both of her and you, you not having any power to stay meeheere. But the Gods will never permitte that any couragious Romane,should ever conceive so vile and degenerate a thought.

推荐功能

1.  Whilst things stood thus amiss between Rustico's Devil and Alibech'sHell, for overmuch eagerness of the one part and too littleperformance of the other, a fire broke out in Capsa and burned thefather of Alibech with his children and every one of his kin, sothat Alibech became the sole heiress to his goods. Whereupon a certainNeerbale, a young man who had wasted his patrimony in high living,sought for Alibech in the belief that she was alive, and succeededin finding her before the Court had declared her father's goodsforfeit as being without an owner. Much to the relief of Rustico andagainst the girl's will, Neerbale brought her back to Capsa andmarried her, so becoming entitled in her right to a large fortune.
2.  Who is able to expresse ingeniously, the diversity of opinions,which hapned among the Ladies, in censuring on the act of MadameDianora, and which of them was most liberall, eithet SigniorGilberto the Husband, Lord Ansaldo the importunate suiter, or theMagitian, expecting to bee bountifully rewarded. Surely, it is amatter beyond my capacity: but after the King had permitted theirdisputation a long while, looking on Madam Fiammetta, he commandedthat she should report her Novel to make an end of their controversie;and she (without any further delaying) thus began. I did alwaies(Noble Ladies) hold it fit and decent, that in such an assembly asthis of ours is, every one ought to speake so succinctly andplainly: that the obscure understanding, concerning the matters spokenof, should have no cause of disputation. For disputes do much betterbecome the Colledges of Schollers, then to be among us, who hardly canmanage our Distaves or Samplers. And therefore I, who intend to relatesomething, which (peradventure) might appeare doubtfull: will forbeare(seeing you in such a difference; for that which hath bin spokenalreadie) to use any difficult discourse; but will speake of one, aman of no meane ranke or quality, being both a valiant and vertuousKing, and what he did, without any impeach or blemish to his honor.
3.  THE SIXT DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
4.  Death may come speedily, and with his Dart
5.   Therein I see, upon good observation,
6.  Ghinotto di Tacco; tooke the Lord Abbot of Clugni as his prisoner,and cured him of a grievous disease, which he had in his stomacke, andafterwards set him at libert. The same Lord Abbot when hee returnedfrom the Court Rome, reconciled Ghinotto to Pope Boniface; who madehim a Knight, and Lord Prior of a goodly Hospitall.

应用

1.  HOW TO HAVE CARE OF MARRYING THEMSELVES. AND LIKEWISE TO POORE
2.  "My daughter," said Rustico, "it will not always be so." And to makesure of it, before either of them moved from the bed they put him insix times, after which the Devil hung his head and was glad to letthem be.
3.  Still thou didst comfort me.
4、  The Provost presently gathering, that the truth in this case waseasie to be knowne; sent first for Master Doctor Mazzeo, to know,whether he compounded any such water, or no: which he affirmed to betrue, and upon what occasion he prepared it. Then the Joyner, theowner of the Chest, and the two Lombards, being severally questionedwithall: it appeared evidently, that the Lombards did steale the Chestin the night season, and carried it home to their owne house. In theend, Ruggiero being brought from the prison, and demanded, where hewas lodged the night before, made answer, that he knew not where.Onely he well remembred, that bearing affection to the Chamber-maideof Master Doctor Mazzeo della Montagna, she brought him into aChamber, where a violl of water stoode in the Window, and he beingextreamly thirsty, dranke it off all. But what became of him afterward(till being awake, he found himselfe enclosed in a Chest, and in thehouse of the two Lombards) he could not say any thing.
5、  Now was Saladine and his Baschaes halfe astonyed with admiration, atthe magnificent minde of Signiour Thorello, who would not forget theleast part of courtesie towardes them, and greatly doubted (seeing thebeauty and riches of the Garments) least they were discovered byThorello. Neverthelesse, one of them thus answered the Lady. Beleeveme Madame, these are rich guiftes, not lightly either to be given,rich or receyved: but in regard of your strict imposition, we arenot able to deny them. This being done, with most gracious andcourteous demeanour, she departed from them, leaving her Husband tokeepe them still companie; who furnished their servants also, withdivers worthy necessaries fitting for their journey.

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网友评论(z0gNHZUm28256))

  • 杭美玉 08-07

      I know Gossip, that it is a matter of common and ordinary custome,for Ladies and Gentlewomen to be graced with favourites, men of fraileand mortall conditions, whose natures are as subject to inconstancy,as their very best endevours dedicated to folly, as I could name nomean number of our Ladies heere in Venice. But when Soveraigne deitiesshall feele the impression of our humane desires, and beholdsubjects of such prevailing efficacy, as to subdue their greatestpower, yea, and make them enamored of mortall creatures: you maywell imagine Gossip, such a beauty is superiour to any other. And suchis the happy fortune of your friend Lisetta, of whose perfections,great Cupid the awefull commanding God of Love himselfe, conceivedsuch an extraordinary liking: as he hath abandoned his seate ofsupreme Majesty, and appeared to in the shape of a mortall man, withlively expression of his amourous passions, and what extremities ofanguish he hath endured, onely for my love. May this be possible?replied the Gossip. Can the Gods be toucht with the apprehension ofour fraile passions? True it is Gossip, answered and so certainlytrue, that his sacred kisses, sweete embraces, and most pleasingspeeches with proffer of his continuall devotion towards me, hathgiven me good cause to confirme what I say, and to thinke myfelicity farre beyond all other womens, being honoured with hisoften nightly visitations.

  • 郭蔼明 08-07

      Worthy Lord Judge (cryed Ribi, on the other side) doe not beleevewhat he saith, for he is a paltry lying fellow, and because hee knew Icame hither to make my complaint for a Male or Cloakebag which hestole from me: hee urgeth this occasion for a paire of drawingStockeings, which he delivered me with his owne hands. If yourLordship will not credit me, I can produce as witnesses, Trecco theShoemaker, with Monna Grassa the Souse-seller, and he that sweepes theChurch of Santa Maria a Verzaia, who saw him when he came postinghither. Maso haling and tugging the Judge by the sleeve, would notsuffer him to heare Ribi, but cryed out still for justice against him,as he did the like on the contrary side.

  • 祖长云 08-07

       Now began she to seeme better comforted, and forbearing to play onthis string any longer, as well knowing the covetousnes of him and hisequals, she said: Holy Father, some few nights past, me thought inmy sleepe, that divers spirits of my kindred appeared to me in avision, who me thought were in very great pains, and desired nothingels but Almes; especially my Godmother, who seemed to be afflictedwith such extrem poverty, that it was most Pittifull to behold. AndI am halfe perswaded, that her torments are the greater, seeing metroubled with such an enemy to goodnesse. Wherefore (good Father) todeliver her soule and the others out of those fearfull flames, amongyour infinite other devout prayers, I would have you to say theforty Masses of S. Gregory, as a means for their happy deliverance,and so she put ten ducates into his hand. Which the holy man acceptedthankfully, and with good words, as also many singular examples,confirmed her bountifull devotion: and when he had given her hisbenediction, home she departed.

  • 林仲文 08-07

      Why how now Friar Reynard? quoth shee, Doe Godfathers use to movesuch questions? Whereto the Friar thus replyed. Madam, when I havelaide off this holy habite (which is a matter very easie for mee todo) I shall seeme in your eye, in all respects made like anotherman, quite from the course of any Religious life. Agnesia, bitingthe lip with a prety smile, said; O my faire Starres! You will neverbee so unfriendly to me. What? You being my Gossip, would you haveme consent unto such a sinne? Our blessed Lady shield mee, for myghostly Father hath often told me, that it is utterly unpardonable:but if it were, I feare too much confiding on mine owne strength.Gossip, the Friar, you speake like a Foole, and feare (in this case)is wholly frivolous, especially, when the motions mooved by such anone as my selfe, who (upon repentance) can grant you pardon andindulgence presently. But I pray you let mee aske you one question,Who is the neerest Kinsman to your Son; either I, that stood at theFont for his Baptisme, or your Husband that begot him? The Lady madeanswere, that it was her Husband. You say very true Gossip, replyedthe Friar, and yet notwithstanding, doth not your Husband (both atboord and bed) enjoy the sweet benefit of your company? Yes, saidthe Lady, why shold he not? Then Lady (quoth Reynard) I, who am not soneere a Kinsman to your Sonne, as your Husband is, why may ye notafford mee the like favour, as you do him? Agnesia, who was noLogitian, and therefore could not stand on any curious answer,especially being so cuningly moved; beleeved, or rather made shew ofbeleeving, that the Godfather said nothing but truth, and thusanswered. What woman is she (Gossip) that knoweth how to answer yourstrange speeches? And, how it came to passe, I know not, but such anagreement passed betweene them, that, for once onely (so it mightnot infrindge the league of Gossip-ship, but that title to countenancetheir further intent) such a favour should be affoorded, so it mightstand cleare from suspition.

  • 艾买提江 08-06

    {  Ricciardo not unacquainted with this her jealous humour, as wellby credible hearing thereof, as also by daily observation, began towith himselfe, that it were best to consider for him, to dissembleamorous affection in some other place, and (henceforward) to set asideall hope, of ever enjoying the love of Madam Catulla, because he wasnow become the servant to another Gentlewoman, pretending (in herhonour) to performe many worthy actions of Armes, Joustes,Tournaments, and all such like noble exercises, as he was wont todoe for Madam Catulla. So that most of the people of Naples, butespecially Madam Catulla, becam perswaded, that his formerfruitlesse love to her was quite changed, and the new elected Lady hadall the glory of his best endevours, persevering so long in thisopinion, as now it passed absolutely for currant. Thus seemed he nowas meere a stranger to her, whose house before he familiarlyfrequented, yet as a neighbour gave her the daies salutations,according as he chanced to see her, or meet her.

  • 石磊 08-05

      There is the great Lady of Barbanicchia; the Queene of Baschia;the Wife to the great Soldane, the Empresse of Osbeccho; theCiancianfera of Norniera; the Semistante of Berlinzona; and theScalpedra of Narsia. But why do I breake my braine, in numbering up somany to you? All the Queenes of the world are there, even so farreas to the Schinchimurra of Prester John, that hath a horne in themidst of her posteriores, albeit not visible to every eye.}

  • 谢宗孝 08-05

      MAGNANIMOUS MINDE OF A FAMOUS LADY

  • 董海洋 08-05

      Violenta, who had concealed her amisse so long as she could, and sawno other remedy, but now at last it must needes be discovered; wentprivately to her Mother, and (in teares) revealed her infirmity,humbly craving her pardon, and furtherance in hiding it from herFather. The Mother being extraordinarily displeased, chiding herwith many sharpe and angry speeches, would needes know with whomshee had thus offended. The Daughter (to keepe Pedro from anydetection) forged a Tale of her owne braine, farre from any truthindeede, which her Mother verily beleeving, and willing to preserveher Daughter from shame, as also the fierce anger of her Husband, hebeing a man of very implacable nature: conveyed her to the CountreyFarme, whither Signior Amarigo sildome or never resorted, intending(under the shadow of sicknesse) to let her lye in there, without theleast suspition of any in Trapani.

  • 魏巍 08-04

       Then let me live content, to be thus painde.

  • 蔡宝磊 08-02

    {  She, on the morrow morning, pretending to her waiting woman, thatshe was scarsly well, and therefore would not be diseased the mostpart of that day; commanded them to leave her alone in her Chamber,and not to returne untill she called for them, locking the doore herselfe for better security. Then opened she the doore of the cave,and going downe the staires, found there her amorous friend Guiscardo,whom she saluting with a chaste and modest kisse; causing him toascend up the stayres with her into her Chamber. This long desired,and now obtained meeting, caused the two deerely affected Lovers, inkinde discourse of amorous argument (without incivill or rudedemeanor) to spend there the most part of that day, to their heartsjoy and mutuall contentment. And having concluded on their oftenmeeting there, in this cunning and concealed sort; Guiscardo wentdowne into the cave againe, the Princesse making the doore fastafter him, and then went forth among her Women. So in the nightseason, Guiscardo ascended up againe by his Ladder of cords, andcovering the loopehole with brambles and bushes, returned (unseeneof any) to his owne lodging: the cave being afterward guilty oftheir often meeting there in this manner.

  • 杨瑞祥 08-02

      When Pedro perceived, that his Wife had spoken nothing but reason,in regard of his over-much neglect towards her, and not using suchHoushold kindnesse, as ought to be betweene Man and Wife, hee returnedher this answer. Well Wife (quoth he) I confesse my fault, andhereafter will labour to amend it; conditionally, that this youth, norany other, may no more visite my House in my absence. Get me thereforesomething to eate, for doubtlesse, this young man and thy selfe fellshort of your Supper, by reason of my so soone returning home. Introth Husband, saide she, we did not eate one bit of any thing, andI will be a true and loyall Wife to thee, so thou wilt be the liketo me. No more words then Wife, replyed Pedro, all is forgotten andforgiven, let us to Supper, and we are all friends. She seeing hisanger was so well appeased, lovingly kissed him, and laying the cloth,set on the supper, which she had provided for her selfe and the youth,and so they supt together merrily, not one unkinde word passingbetweene them. After Supper, the youth was sent away in friendlymanner, and Pedro was alwayes afterward more loving to his Wife,then formerly hee had beene, and no complaint passed on either side,but mutuall joy and Houshold contentment, such as ought to beebetweene Man and Wife.

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