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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:马修·克劳利 大小:lK7PpYtd80768KB 下载:woKfmHY699644次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:4YYObss181981条
日期:2020-08-08 06:06:24
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon hadoverheard their counsels and had told her; she went down thereforeto the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitorsshe stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of thecloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:
2.  "I stayed with Calypso seven years straight on end, and wateredthe good clothes she gave me with my tears during the whole time;but at last when the eighth year came round she bade me depart ofher own free will, either because Jove had told her she must, orbecause she had changed her mind. She sent me from her island on araft, which she provisioned with abundance of bread and wine. Moreovershe gave me good stout clothing, and sent me a wind that blew bothwarm and fair. Days seven and ten did I sail over the sea, and onthe eighteenth I caught sight of the first outlines of the mountainsupon your coast- and glad indeed was I to set eyes upon them.Nevertheless there was still much trouble in store for me, for at thispoint Neptune would let me go no further, and raised a great stormagainst me; the sea was so terribly high that I could no longer keepto my raft, which went to pieces under the fury of the gale, and I hadto swim for it, till wind and current brought me to your shores.
3.  "So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. WhenI heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see youany more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a goodlook at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come intothe country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the towngenerally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what thesuitors are doing."
4.  BOOK XV.
5.  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'
6.  Ulysses answered, "May King Jove grant all happiness toTelemachus, and fulfil the desire of his heart."

计划指导

1.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."
2.  In the end he deemed it best to take to the woods, and he foundone upon some high ground not far from the water. There he creptbeneath two shoots of olive that grew from a single stock- the onean ungrafted sucker, while the other had been grafted. No wind,however squally, could break through the cover they afforded, norcould the sun's rays pierce them, nor the rain get through them, soclosely did they grow into one another. Ulysses crept under theseand began to make himself a bed to lie on, for there was a greatlitter of dead leaves lying about- enough to make a covering for twoor three men even in hard winter weather. He was glad enough to seethis, so he laid himself down and heaped the leaves all round him.Then, as one who lives alone in the country, far from any neighbor,hides a brand as fire-seed in the ashes to save himself from having toget a light elsewhere, even so did Ulysses cover himself up withleaves; and Minerva shed a sweet sleep upon his eyes, closed hiseyelids, and made him lose all memories of his sorrows.
3.  She brought the fire and sulphur, as he had bidden her, andUlysses thoroughly purified the cloisters and both the inner and outercourts. Then she went inside to call the women and tell them whathad happened; whereon they came from their apartment with torches intheir hands, and pressed round Ulysses to embrace him, kissing hishead and shoulders and taking hold of his hands. It made him feel asif he should like to weep, for he remembered every one of them.
4.  "I know, and understand you," replied Ulysses; "you need say nomore. Let us be going, but if you have a stick ready cut, let mehave it to walk with, for you say the road is a very rough one."
5.  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:
6.  "These men hatched a plot against me that would have reduced me tothe very extreme of misery, for when the ship had got some way outfrom land they resolved on selling me as a slave. They stripped meof the shirt and cloak that I was wearing, and gave me instead thetattered old clouts in which you now see me; then, towardsnightfall, they reached the tilled lands of Ithaca, and there theybound me with a strong rope fast in the ship, while they went on shoreto get supper by the sea side. But the gods soon undid my bonds forme, and having drawn my rags over my head I slid down the rudderinto the sea, where I struck out and swam till I was well clear ofthem, and came ashore near a thick wood in which I lay concealed. Theywere very angry at my having escaped and went searching about forme, till at last they thought it was no further use and went back totheir ship. The gods, having hidden me thus easily, then took me toa good man's door- for it seems that I am not to die yet awhile."

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1.  "Ulysses, who was as crafty as he was valiant, hit upon thefollowing plan:
2.  "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.
3.  Therewith she went down into the cave to look for the safesthiding places, while Ulysses brought up all the treasure of gold,bronze, and good clothing which the Phaecians had given him. Theystowed everything carefully away, and Minerva set a stone againstthe door of the cave. Then the two sat down by the root of the greatolive, and consulted how to compass the destruction of the wickedsuitors.
4.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
5.   "Hear me, men of Ithaca, I hope that you may never have a kind andwell-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern you equitably; Ihope that all your chiefs henceforward may be cruel and unjust, forthere is not one of you but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled you asthough he were your father. I am not half so angry with the suitors,for if they choose to do violence in the naughtiness of theirhearts, and wager their heads that Ulysses will not return, they cantake the high hand and eat up his estate, but as for you others I amshocked at the way in which you all sit still without even trying tostop such scandalous goings on-which you could do if you chose, foryou are many and they are few."
6.  "Alas! I shall either be always feeble and of no prowess, or I amtoo young, and have not yet reached my full strength so as to beable to hold my own if any one attacks me. You others, therefore,who are stronger than I, make trial of the bow and get this contestsettled."

应用

1.  "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'
2.  The other suitors were much displeased at this, and one of the youngmen said, "Antinous, you did ill in striking that poor wretch of atramp: it will be worse for you if he should turn out to be somegod- and we know the gods go about disguised in all sorts of ways aspeople from foreign countries, and travel about the world to see whodo amiss and who righteously."
3.  "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'
4、  Another said, "I hope he may be no more successful in other thingsthan he is likely to be in stringing this bow."
5、  So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.

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  • 李亚隆 08-07

      Then she went back to Olympus; but Telemachus stirred Pisistratuswith his heel to rouse him, and said, "Wake up Pisistratus, and yokethe horses to the chariot, for we must set off home."

  • 王阳 08-07

      "My friends, this man will give us no quarter. He will stand wherehe is and shoot us down till he has killed every man among us. Letus then show fight; draw your swords, and hold up the tables to shieldyou from his arrows. Let us have at him with a rush, to drive him fromthe pavement and doorway: we can then get through into the town, andraise such an alarm as shall soon stay his shooting."

  • 王雪光 08-07

       "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'

  • 罗思章 08-07

      To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."

  • 贡德·弗兰克 08-06

    {  "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."

  • 王建中 08-05

      Euryclea left the cloister to tell the women, and make them cometo Ulysses; in the meantime he called Telemachus, the stockman, andthe swineherd. "Begin," said he, "to remove the dead, and make thewomen help you. Then, get sponges and clean water to swill down thetables and seats. When you have thoroughly cleansed the wholecloisters, take the women into the space between the domed room andthe wall of the outer court, and run them through with your swordstill they are quite dead, and have forgotten all about love and theway in which they used to lie in secret with the suitors."}

  • 桑赫斯特 08-05

      On this Helen told the maid servants to set beds in the room thatwas in the gatehouse, and to make them with good red rugs, andspread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks for the gueststo wear. So the maids went out, carrying a torch, and made the beds,to which a man-servant presently conducted the strangers. Thus,then, did Telemachus and Pisistratus sleep there in the forecourt,while the son of Atreus lay in an inner room with lovely Helen byhis side.

  • 埃蒙斯 08-05

      "'Mother,' said I, 'I was forced to come here to consult the ghostof the Theban prophet Teiresias. I have never yet been near theAchaean land nor set foot on my native country, and I have had nothingbut one long series of misfortunes from the very first day that Iset out with Agamemnon for Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fightthe Trojans. But tell me, and tell me true, in what way did you die?Did you have a long illness, or did heaven vouchsafe you a gentle easypassage to eternity? Tell me also about my father, and the son whomI left behind me; is my property still in their hands, or has some oneelse got hold of it, who thinks that I shall not return to claim it?Tell me again what my wife intends doing, and in what mind she is;does she live with my son and guard my estate securely, or has shemade the best match she could and married again?'

  • 汤龙光 08-04

       "Neptune, however, lay with his daughter, and she had a son byhim, the great Nausithous, who reigned over the Phaecians.Nausithous had two sons Rhexenor and Alcinous; Apollo killed the firstof them while he was still a bridegroom and without male issue; but heleft a daughter Arete, whom Alcinous married, and honours as noother woman is honoured of all those that keep house along withtheir husbands.

  • 张杰辉 08-02

    {  "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']

  • 邓玺乾 08-02

      Ulysses answered, "Laodamas, why do you taunt me in this way? mymind is set rather on cares than contests; I have been throughinfinite trouble, and am come among you now as a suppliant, prayingyour king and people to further me on my return home."

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