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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:高旭 大小:288XIwpI94205KB 下载:QEIQZo8b33009次
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日期:2020-08-05 02:29:54
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  This Master Chappelet, was of so good and commendable life; that,being a Notarie, he held it in high disdaine, that any of hisContractes (although he made but few) should be found withoutfalshoode. And looke how many soever hee dealt withall, he would beurged and required thereto, offering them his paines and travailefor nothing, but to bee requited otherwise then by money; whichprooved to bee his much larger recompencing, and returned to him thefarre greater benefit. Hee tooke the onely pleasure of the world, tobeare false witnesse, if hee were thereto entreated, and(oftentimes) when hee was not requested at all. Likewise because inthose times, great trust and beleefe was given to an oath, he makingno care or conscience to be perjured: greatly advantaged himselfe byLaw suites, in regard that many matters relyed upon his oath, anddelivering the truth according to his knowledge.
2.  Now, as concerning your last doubt, which most of all afflictethyou, namely, how you shall deale with me; boldly rid your braine ofany such disturbance; for if you have resolved now in your extremityof yeres, to doe that which your younger dayes evermore despised, Imeane, to become cruell; use your utmost cruelty against me: for I wilnever intreat you to the contrary, because I am the sole occasion ofthis offence, if it doe deserve the name of an offence. And this Idare assure you, that if you deale not with me, as you have donealready, or intend to Guiscardo, mine owne hands shall act as much:and therfore give over your teares to women; and if you purpose tobe cruel, let him and me in death drinke both of one cup, at leastif you imagine that we have deserved it.
3.  The time being propitious for their parting thence, the Marinershoised their sayles, leaving the port of Alexandria, and saylingprosperously many dayes together. When they had past the Countrey ofSardinia, and (as they imagined) were well neere to their journeyesend; sodainely arose boysterous and contrary windes, which were soimpetuous beyond all measure, and so tormented the Ship wherein theLady was; that the Mariners seeing no signe of comfort, gave overall hope of escaping with life. Neverthelesse, as men most expert inimplacable dangers, they laboured to their uttermost power, andcontended with infinite blustring tempests, for the space of two dayesand nights together, hoping the third day would prove more favourable.But therein they saw themselves deceyved, for the violence continuedstill, encreasing in the night time more and more, being not any wayable to comprehend either where they were, or what course theytooke, neither by Marinall judgement, or any apprehension elsewhatsoever, the heavens were so clouded, and the nights darkenesseso extreame.Beeing (unknowne to them) neere the Isle of Majorica, they felt theShippe to split in the bottome: by meanes whereof, perceiving now nohope of escaping (every one caring for himselfe, and not any other)they threw foorth a Squiffe on the troubled waves, reposing moreconfidence of safety that way, then abiding any longer in the brokenship. Howbeit such as were first descended downe, made stoutresistance against all other followers, with their drawne weapons: butsafety of life so far prevayled, that what with the Tempests violence,and over lading of the Squiffe, it sunke to the bottome, and allperished that were therein. The Ship being thus split, and more thenhalfe full of water, tossed and tormented by the blustring windes,first one way, and then another: was at last driven into a strond ofthe Isle Majorica, no other persons therein remaining, but onely theLady and her women, all of them (through the rude tempest, and theirowne conceived feare) lying still, as if they were more then halfedead. And there, within a stones cast of the neighboring shore theship (by the rough surging billowes) was fixed fast in the sands,and so continued all the rest of the night, without any furthermolestation of the windes.
4.  Temptations did not long delay an assault on his constancy; andfinding it much beyond his strength to withstand them, he soon gave upthe battle, and confessed himself worsted. So putting away all saintlythoughts, prayers and mortifications, he let his mind dwell on thefreshness and beauty of his companion. From this he passed to thinkingof the best means of bringing her to his desires without giving hercause to suspect him of lewdness.Therefore, satisfying himself by a few questions that she had neverhad carnal knowledge of a man, and was indeed as innocent as sheseemed, he thought of a plan to enjoy her under colour of serving God.He began expounding to her the Devil's enmity to the Almighty, andwent on to impress upon her that the most acceptable service she couldrender to God would be to put the Devil in Hell, whereto the Lordhad condemned him.
5.  After so much time was expired, as conveniently might agree withsorrow, and mourning; her Brethren made many motions to her, to oyneher selfe in marriage againe, because she was extraordinarily rich,and as yet but yong in yeares. Now although she was well contentednever to be married any more; yet being continually importuned bythem, and remembring the honorable honesty of Frederigo, his lastpoore, yet magnificent dinner, in killing his Faulcon for her sake,she saide to her Brethren. This kind of widdowed estate doth like meso well, as willingly I would never leave it: but seeing you are soearnest for my second marriage, let me plainly tell you, that I willnever accept of any other husband, but onely Frederigo di Alberino.
6.  This last discourse (faire and vertuous company) induceth me to tellyou, how an honest Courtier reprehended in like manner (and nothingunprofitably) base covetousnesse in a Merchant of extraordinarywealth. Which Tale, although (in effect) it may seeme to resemblethe former; yet perhaps, it will prove no lesse pleasing to you, inregard it sorted to as good an end.

计划指导

1.  PERILLOUS MISFORTUNES
2.  In this habite and outward appearance, hee seemed to leade anaustere and sanctimonious life, highly commending penance andabstinence, never eating flesh, or drinking wine, but when he wasprovided of both in a close corner. And before any person could takenotice thereof, hee became (of a theefe) Ruffian, forswearer, andmurtherer, as formerly he had-beene a great Preacher; yet notabandoning the forenamed vices, when secretly he could put any of themin execution. Moreover, being made Priest, when he was celebratingMasse at the Altar, if he saw himselfe to be observed by any; he wouldmost mournefully reade the passion of our Saviour, as one whose tearescost him little, whensoever hee pleased to use them; so that, in ashort while, by his preaching and teares, he fed the humours of theVenetians so pleasingly, that they made him executor (well-neere) ofall their Testaments, yea, many chose him as depositary or Guardion oftheir monies; because he was both Confessour and Councellor, almost toall the men and women.
3.  THE SONG
4.  Pamphilus hath declared to us, by his Tale, how the goodnesse of Godregardeth not our errors, when they proceede from things which weecannot discerne. And I intend to approove by mine, what argument ofinfallible truth, the same benignity delivereth of it selfe, byenduring patiently the faults of them, that (both in word and worke)should declare unfaigned testimony of such gracious goodnesse, and notto live so dissolutely as they doe. To the end, that othersillumined by their light of life, may beleeve with the strongerconstancy of minde.
5.  Messer Currado, in kinde love to the strangers that hee hadinvited to supper, gave over any further contestation; onely hesaid. Seeing thou assurest me, to let me see thy affirmation fortruth, by other of the same Fowles living (a thing which as yet Inever saw, or heard of) I am content to make proofe thereof tomorrow morning, till then I shall rest satisfied: but, upon my word,if I finde it otherwise, expect such a sound payment, as thy knaveryjustly deserveth, to make thee remember it all thy life time. Thecontention ceassing for the night season, Messer Currado, who thoughhe had slept well, remained still discontented in his minde: arosein the morning by breake of day, and puffing and blowing angerly,called for his horses, commanding Chichibio to mount on one of them;so riding on towards the River, where (earely every morning) he hadseene plenty of Cranes, he sayde to his man; We shall see anonSirra, whether thou or I lyed yesternight.
6.  A Knight requested Madam Oretta, to ride behinde him on horse-backe,and promised, to tell her an excellent Tale by the way. But the Ladyperceiving, that his discourse was idle, and much worse delivered:entreated him to let her walke on foote againe.

推荐功能

1.  Know then (most gracious assembly) that it is not many yeeres since,when there lived in Salerne, a very famous Physitian, named SignieurMazzeo della Montagna, who being already well entred into yeeres,would (neverthelesse) marrie with a beautifull young Mayden of theCity, bestowing rich garments, gaudie attyres, Ringes, and Jewelles onher, such as few Women else could any way equall, because hee lovedher most deerely. Yet being an aged man, and never remembring, howvaine and idle a thing it is, for age to make such an unfittingElection, injurious to both; and therefore endangering that domestickeagreement, which ought to be the sole and maine comfort of Marriage:it maketh me therefore to misdoubt, that as in our former Tale ofSigniour Ricciardo de Cinzica, some dayes of the Calender did hereseeme as distastefull, as those that occasioned the other Womansdiscontentment. In such unequall choyses, Parents commonly are moreblamewoorthy, then any imputation, to bee layde on the young Women,who gladdely would enjoy such as in heart they have elected: butthat their Parents, looking through the glasse of greedie lucre, doeoverthrow both their owne hopes, and the faire fortunes of theirchildren together.
2.  Hitherto I have lived with the losse of time, which yet (in somemeasure) may be releeved and recompenced: For, though Fortune weremine enemy in Mariage, by such a disproportion of our conditions:yet she may befriend in another nature, and kindely redeeme the injurydone me. Wherefore Lesca, to be as compleate in this case, as I amin all the rest beside; I have resolved upon a private Friend, and onemore worthy then any other, Namely, my Servant Pyrrhus, whose youthcarieth some correspondency with mine; and so constantly have I setledmy love to him, as I am not well, but when I thinke on him, or seehim: and (indeede) shall dye, except the sooner I may enjoy him. Andtherefore, if my life and well-fare be respected by thee, let himunderstand the integrity of mine affection, by such good means as thoufindest it most expedient to be done: entreating him from me, that Imay have some conference with him, when he shall thereto besolicited by me.
3.  Mithridanes envying the life and liberality of Nathan, andtravelling thither, with a setled resolution to kill him: chaunceth toconferre with Nathan unknowne. And being instructed by him, in whatmanner he might best performe the bloody deede, according as heegave direction, hee meeteth with him in a small Thicket or Woode,where knowing him to be the same man, that taught him how to take awayhis life: Confounded with shame, hee acknowledgeth his horribleintention, and becommeth his loyall friend.
4.  Coming, then, to my story, I must tell you that in Capsa, a cityof Barbary, there dwelt aforetime a very rich man, who had amongseveral children a little daughter, fair and of a docile temper, whosename was Alibech.
5.   The Potestate well noting her brave carriage, her singular beautieand praiseworthy parts, her words apparantly witnessing the heighth ofher minde: beganne to take compassion on her, and doubted, leastshee would confesse some such matter, as should enforce him topronounce the sentence of death against her. But she boldly scorningall delayes, or any further protraction of time; demanded again,what was her accusation? Madame, answered the Potestate, I am soryto tel you, what needs I must, your husband (whom you see presentheere) is the complainant against you, avouching, that he tooke you inthe act of adultery with another man: and therefore he requireth,that, according to the rigour of the Statute heere in force with us, Ishould pronounce sentence against you, and (consequently) theinfliction of death. Which I cannot do, if you confesse not thefact, and therefore be well advised, how you answer me, and tell methe truth, if it be as your Husband accuseth you, or no.
6.  In the City of Pistoya, there dwelt sometime a beautifullGentlewoman, being a Widdow, whom two of our Florentines (the onenamed Rinuccio Palermini, and the other Alessandro Chiarmontesi,having withdrawne themselves to Pistoya) desperately affected, the oneignorant of the others intention, but each carrying his caseclosely, as hoping to be possessed of her. This Gentlewoman, namedMadame Francesca de Lazzari, being often solicited by theirmessages, and troublesomely pestered with their importunities: at last(lesse advisedly then she intended) shee granted admittance to heareeither of them speake. Which she repenting, and coveting to be ridof them both, a matter not easie to be done: she wittily devised theonely meanes, namely, to move such a motion to them, as neitherwould willingly undertake, yet within the compasse of possibility; butthey failing in the performance, shee might have the more honestoccasion, to bee free from all further mollestation by them, and herpolitike intention was thus projected.

应用

1.  Then Rustico said: "Bless thee, my dear daughter; let us go atonce and put him in his place, that I may be at peace."
2.  Passing on their time in this height of felicity, and not crossed byany sinister accidents, it came to passe (as often wee may obseryein the like occasions, that although delights doe most especiallyplease us, yet they breede surfet, when they swell too over-great inabundance) that Restagnone, who most deerely affected his faireNinetta, and had her now in his free possession, without any perill ofloosing her: grew now also to bee weary of her, and consequently, tofaile in those familiar performances, which formerly had passedbetweene them. For, being one day invited to a Banket, hee saw there abeautifull Gentlewoman of that Countrey, whose perfections pleasinghim beyond all comparison: he laboured (by painfull pursuite) to winhis purpose; and meeting with her in divers private places, grewprodigall in his expences upon her. This could not be so closelycarried, but being seene and observed by Ninetta, she became possessedwith such extreame jealousie, that hee could not doe any thingwhatsoever, but immediately she had knowledge of it: which fire,growing to a flame in her, her patience became extreamely provoked,urging rough and rude speeches from her to him, and daily tormentinghim beyond power of sufferance.
3.  She being thus happily bestowne, he minded to tarry no longer inLondon; but, in his wonted begging manner, travailing thorough theCountry with his sonne Perotto, at length he came into Wales: butnot without much weary paine and travell, being never used before,to journey so far on foot. There dwelt another Lord, in office ofMarshalship to the King of England, whose power extended over thoseparts: a man of very great authority, keeping a most noble andbountifull house, which they termed the President of Wales hisCourt; whereto the Count and his Son oftentimes resorted, as findingthere good releefe and comfort. On a day, one of the Presidentssons, accompanied with divers other Gentlemens children, wereperforming certaine youthfull sports, and pastimes, as running,leaping, and such like, wherein Perotto presumed to make one amongthem, excelling all the rest in such commendable manner, as none ofthem came any thing nere him. Divers times the President had takennotice thereof, and was so well pleased with the Lads behaviour,that he enquired of whence he was? Answere was made, that he was apoore mans Son, that every day came for an almes to his gate.
4、  After this promise thus made, the good cheare, favors and kindnessesdone by the Doctor to them, was beyond the compasse of all relation:whereof they made no more then a meere mockery, flouting him to hisface, and yet his Wisedome could not discerne it. Moreover, theypromised, that they would give him to Wife, the faire Countesse diCivillari, who was the onely goodliest creature to be found in thewhole Culattario of humane generation. The Doctor demanded, whatCountesse that was? Oh Sir, answered Buffalmaco, she is a greatLady, one worthy to have issue by; and few houses are there in theworld, where she hath not some jurisdiction and command: so that notmeane people onely, but even the greatest Lords, at the sound of herTrumpets, do very gladlie pay her tribute. And I dare boldlyaffirme, that whensoever shee walketh to any place, she yeeldeth a hotand sensible savour, albeit she keepeth most of all close. Yet onceevery night, shee duely observeth it (as a Custome) to passe fromher owne house, to bathe her feete in the River of Arno, and take alittle of the sweeter Ayre: albeit her continuall residencie, iswithin the Kingdome of Laterino.
5、  And come againe some other day.

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网友评论(Wn3REn8i99278))

  • 赵本水 08-04

      Understand then (Noble Ladies) that neere to Sicily, there is asmall Island, commonly called Liparis, wherein (not long since)lived a yong Damosell, named Constance, born of very sufficientparentage in the same Island. There dwelt also a yong man calledMartuccio Gomito, of comely feature, well conditioned, and notunexpert in many vertuous qualities; affecting Constance in hartymanner: and she so answerable to him in the same kinde, that to bein his company, was her onely felicity. Martuccio coveting to enjoyher in marriage, made his intent knowne to her Father: whoupbraiding him with poverty, tolde him plainly that he should not haveher. Martuccio greeving to see himselfe thus despised, because hewas poore: made such good meanes, that he was provided of a smallBarke; and calling such friends (as he thought fit) to hisassociation, made a solemne vow, that he would never returne backeto Liparis, untill he was rich, and in better condition.

  • 武东和 08-04

      Mother and Brethren, I am verily perswaded, that those accidentswhich he disclosed to you, hath doubtlesse (in the same manner)happened to him, and you shall heare how. Very true it is, that thisseeming honest man, to whom (in a lucklesse houre) you married me,stileth himselfe by the name of a Merchant, coveting to be soaccounted and credited, as holy in outward appearance, as aReligious Monke, and as demure in lookes, as the modestest Maide: likea notorious common drunkard, is a Taverne hunter, where making hisluxurius matches, one while with one Whore, then againe withanother; hee causeth mee every night to sit tarrying for him, evenin the same sort as you found me: sometimes till midnight, andotherwhiles till broad day light in the morning.

  • 王华 08-04

       After he had heard and observed all these things, he stoode awhile as confounded with feare and pitty, like a simple silly man,hoodwinkt with his owne passions, not knowing the subtle enemiescunning illusions in offering false suggestions to the sight, to workehis owne ends thereby, and encrease the number of his deceivedservants. Forthwith he perswaded himselfe, that he might make good useof this womans tormenting, so justly imposed on the Knight toprosecute, if thus it should continue still every Friday. Wherefore,setting a good note or marke upon the place, he returned backe tohis owne people, and at such time as he thought convenient, sent fordivers of his kindred and friends from Ravenna, who being present withhim, thus he spake to them.

  • 李晓安 08-04

      When he heard himselfe so severely conjured, by the love he bareto her, and loved none else in the world beside: he gave a farremore hart-sicke sigh, then before. Then his Lady and Mistresseentreated him seriously, to let her know the cause of those twodeepe sighes: whereto Anichino thus replyed. Madam, if I should tellyou, I stand greatly in feare of offending you: and when I have toldyou, I doubt your discovery thereof to some other. Beleeve me Anichino(quoth she) therein thou neither canst, or shalt offend me.Moreover, assure thy selfe, that I will never disclose it to anyother, except I may do it with thy consent. Madame (saide hee)seeing you have protested such a solemne promise to mee, I willreveale no meane secret unto you.

  • 伯克 08-03

    {  Ave Maria (quoth Simonida, crossing her selfe) Alas deareBrethren, I know not what you say, or meane, nor wherein my Husbandshould bee offended, or make any complaint at all of me. Arrigucciohearing this looked on her like a man that had lost his Senses: forwell he remembred, how many cruell blowes he had given her on theface, beside scratches of his nailes, and spurnes of his feet, as alsothe cutting of her haire, the least shew of all which misusage, wasnot now to be seene. Her brethren likewise briefly told her, the wholeeffect of her Husbands speeches, shewing her the thred, and in whatcruell manner he sware hee did beate her. Simonida, turning then toher Husband, and seeming as confounded with amazement, said. How isthis Husband? what doe I heare? would you have me supposed (to yourowne shame and disgrace) to be a bad woman, and your selfe a cruellcurst man, when (on either side) there is no such matter? When wereyou this night heere in the house with mee? Or when should you beatemee, and I not feele nor know it? Beleeve me (sweete heart) allthese are meerely miracles to me.

  • 乔纳森·艾伦 08-02

      This counsell pleased the King very highly, and he being a Prince ofgreat understanding, gave order to have it accordingly followed, andthereby valiantly vanquished his enemies. Heereupon, Martuccio came tobe great in his grace, as also consequently rich, and seated in nomeane place of authority. Now as worthy and commendable actions aresoone spread abroad, in honor of the man by whom they hapned: evenso the fame of this rare got victory, was quickly noysed throughoutthe Countrey, and came to the hearing of poore Constance, thatMartuccio Gomito (whom she supposed so long since to be dead) wasliving, and in honourable condition. The love which formerly shebare unto him, being not altogether extinct in her heart; of a smallsparke, brake forth into a sodaine flame, and so encreased day by day,that her hope (being before almost quite dead) revived againe inchearfull manner.}

  • 莱斯科维奇 08-02

      The simple maiden, aged perhaps some fourteen years, moved rather bya childish whim than any real vocation, set out on the morrow aloneand telling nobody to walk into the desert. So firmly was she resolvedthat after several days of hardship she reached the wilderness ofThebais. From afar she descried a little hut, and coming up to it,found there a holy man. Amazed to see such a one there, he askedwhat she came to seek. Her answer was that, aspiring towards God,she came thither to serve Him, and in the hope of finding a teacher tothat end.

  • 徐园长 08-02

      Two yong Gentlemen, the one named Melisso, borne in the City ofLaiazzo: and the other Giose of Antioche, travalled together untoSalomon, the famous King of Great Britaine. The one desiring to learnewhat he should do, whereby to compasse and winne the love of men.The other craved to be enstructed by what meanes hee might reclaime anheadstrong and unruly wife. And what answeres the wise King gaveunto them both, before they departed away from him.

  • 裴秀智 08-01

       Now was Saladine and his Baschaes halfe astonyed with admiration, atthe magnificent minde of Signiour Thorello, who would not forget theleast part of courtesie towardes them, and greatly doubted (seeing thebeauty and riches of the Garments) least they were discovered byThorello. Neverthelesse, one of them thus answered the Lady. Beleeveme Madame, these are rich guiftes, not lightly either to be given,rich or receyved: but in regard of your strict imposition, we arenot able to deny them. This being done, with most gracious andcourteous demeanour, she departed from them, leaving her Husband tokeepe them still companie; who furnished their servants also, withdivers worthy necessaries fitting for their journey.

  • 赵梅兰 07-30

    {  Wearisome is my life to me, etc.

  • 阿巴多 07-30

      In our owne City (more full of craft and deceit, then love orfaithfull dealing) there lived not many yeeres since, a Gentlewoman ofgood spirit, highly minded, endued with beauty and all commendablequalities, as any other woman (by nature) could be. Her name, or anyothers, concerned in this Novel, I meane not to make manifest,albeit I know them, because some are yet living, and thereby may bescindalized; and therefore it shall suffice to passe them over witha smile. This Gentlewoman, seeing her selfe to be descended of verygreat parentage, and (by chance) married to an Artezan, a Cloathyer orDraper, that lived by the making and selling of cloth. Shee couldnot (because he was a Tradesman) take downe the height of her minde;conceiving, that no man of meane condition (how rich soever) wasworthy to enjoy a Gentlewoman in marriage. Observing moreover, thatwith all his wealth and treasure, he understood nothing better, thento open skeines of yarne, fill shuttles lay webbes in his Loomes, ordispute with his Spinsters, about their businesse.

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