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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘良成 大小:uU81JQw098788KB 下载:aoYYNfCN70880次
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日期:2020-08-12 07:09:22
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阿斯彭

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "We were frightened out of our senses by his loud voice andmonstrous form, but I managed to say, 'We are Achaeans on our way homefrom Troy, but by the will of Jove, and stress of weather, we havebeen driven far out of our course. We are the people of Agamemnon, sonof Atreus, who has won infinite renown throughout the whole world,by sacking so great a city and killing so many people. We thereforehumbly pray you to show us some hospitality, and otherwise make ussuch presents as visitors may reasonably expect. May your excellencyfear the wrath of heaven, for we are your suppliants, and Jove takesall respectable travellers under his protection, for he is the avengerof all suppliants and foreigners in distress.'
2.  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."
3.  THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.
4.  As he said this Euryclea left the cloister to fetch some more water,for the first had been all spilt; and when she had washed him andanointed him with oil, Ulysses drew his seat nearer to the fire towarm himself, and hid the scar under his rags. Then Penelope begantalking to him and said:
5.  "Stranger," replied Eumaeus, "as regards your question: sit still,make yourself comfortable, drink your wine, and listen to me. Thenights are now at their longest; there is plenty of time both forsleeping and sitting up talking together; you ought not to go to bedtill bed time, too much sleep is as bad as too little; if any one ofthe others wishes to go to bed let him leave us and do so; he can thentake my master's pigs out when he has done breakfast in the morning.We two will sit here eating and drinking in the hut, and telling oneanother stories about our misfortunes; for when a man has sufferedmuch, and been buffeted about in the world, he takes pleasure inrecalling the memory of sorrows that have long gone by. As regardsyour question, then, my tale is as follows:
6.  Meantime the suitors went on board and sailed their ways over thesea, intent on murdering Telemachus. Now there is a rocky islet calledAsteris, of no great size, in mid channel between Ithaca and Samos,and there is a harbour on either side of it where a ship can lie. Herethen the Achaeans placed themselves in ambush.

计划指导

1.  "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'
2.  So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had gotsafely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return tohis wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had gothim into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by,there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back toIthaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, histroubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun topity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasingand would not let him get home.
3.  "'Then,' said they, 'if no man is attacking you, you must be ill;when Jove makes people ill, there is no help for it, and you hadbetter pray to your father Neptune.'
4.  "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']
5.  In four days he had completed the whole work, and on the fifthCalypso sent him from the island after washing him and giving him someclean clothes. She gave him a goat skin full of black wine, andanother larger one of water; she also gave him a wallet full ofprovisions, and found him in much good meat. Moreover, she made thewind fair and warm for him, and gladly did Ulysses spread his sailbefore it, while he sat and guided the raft skilfully by means ofthe rudder. He never closed his eyes, but kept them fixed on thePleiads, on late-setting Bootes, and on the Bear- which men alsocall the wain, and which turns round and round where it is, facingOrion, and alone never dipping into the stream of Oceanus- for Calypsohad told him to keep this to his left. Days seven and ten did hesail over the sea, and on the eighteenth the dim outlines of themountains on the nearest part of the Phaeacian coast appeared,rising like a shield on the horizon.
6.  "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."

推荐功能

1.  Telemachus gave him no heed, but sat silently watching his father,expecting every moment that he would begin his attack upon thesuitors.
2.  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.
3.  He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:
4.  The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."
5.   With these words he made a drink-offering, and when he had drunkhe put the gold cup again into the hands of Amphinomus, who walkedaway serious and bowing his head, for he foreboded evil. But even sohe did not escape destruction, for Minerva had doomed him fall bythe hand of Telemachus. So he took his seat again at the place fromwhich he had come.
6.  "'When you have reached this spot, as I now tell you, dig a trench acubit or so in length, breadth, and depth, and pour into it as adrink-offering to all the dead, first, honey mixed with milk, thenwine, and in the third place water-sprinkling white barley meal overthe whole. Moreover you must offer many prayers to the poor feebleghosts, and promise them that when you get back to Ithaca you willsacrifice a barren heifer to them, the best you have, and will loadthe pyre with good things. More particularly you must promise thatTeiresias shall have a black sheep all to himself, the finest in allyour flocks.

应用

1.  Thus did he speak, and they went on board even as he had said. Butas Telemachus was thus busied, praying also and sacrificing to Minervain the ship's stern, there came to him a man from a distant country, aseer, who was flying from Argos because he had killed a man. He wasdescended from Melampus, who used to live in Pylos, the land of sheep;he was rich and owned a great house, but he was driven into exile bythe great and powerful king Neleus. Neleus seized his goods and heldthem for a whole year, during which he was a close prisoner in thehouse of king Phylacus, and in much distress of mind both on accountof the daughter of Neleus and because he was haunted by a great sorrowthat dread Erinyes had laid upon him. In the end, however, heescaped with his life, drove the cattle from Phylace to Pylos, avengedthe wrong that had been done him, and gave the daughter of Neleus tohis brother. Then he left the country and went to Argos, where itwas ordained that he should reign over much people. There hemarried, established himself, and had two famous sons Antiphates andMantius. Antiphates became father of Oicleus, and Oicleus ofAmphiaraus, who was dearly loved both by Jove and by Apollo, but hedid not live to old age, for he was killed in Thebes by reason of awoman's gifts. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius, theother son of Melampus, was father to Polypheides and Cleitus.Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake,that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheidesthe greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.He quarrelled with his father and went to live in Hyperesia, wherehe remained and prophesied for all men.
2.  The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.
3.  To this Penelope said, "As long, sir, as you will sit here andtalk to me, I can have no desire to go to bed. Still, people cannot dopermanently without sleep, and heaven has appointed us dwellers onearth a time for all things. I will therefore go upstairs andrecline upon that couch which I have never ceased to flood with mytears from the day Ulysses set out for the city with a hateful name."
4、  "My dear wife," replied Menelaus, "I see the likeness just as youdo. His hands and feet are just like Ulysses'; so is his hair, withthe shape of his head and the expression of his eyes. Moreover, when Iwas talking about Ulysses, and saying how much he had suffered on myaccount, tears fell from his eyes, and he hid his face in his mantle."
5、  There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."

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  • 阿伯 08-11

      And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.

  • 马丁·巴伦 08-11

      "When at last we got to the island where we had left the rest of ourships, we found our comrades lamenting us, and anxiously awaitingour return. We ran our vessel upon the sands and got out of her onto the sea shore; we also landed the Cyclops' sheep, and dividedthem equitably amongst us so that none might have reason tocomplain. As for the ram, my companions agreed that I should have itas an extra share; so I sacrificed it on the sea shore, and burned itsthigh bones to Jove, who is the lord of all. But he heeded not mysacrifice, and only thought how he might destroy my ships and mycomrades.

  • 曹秉局 08-11

       "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'

  • 黄秋葵 08-11

      "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.

  • 安德鲁斯科特博古斯瓦夫斯基 08-10

    {  Now when Laertes and the others had done dinner, Ulysses began bysaying, "Some of you go out and see if they are not getting close upto us." So one of Dolius's sons went as he was bid. Standing on thethreshold he could see them all quite near, and said to Ulysses, "Herethey are, let us put on our armour at once."

  • 唐俊彦 08-09

      Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.}

  • 谢尚威 08-09

      Menelaus smiled and took Telemachus's hand within his own. "What yousay," said he, "shows that you come of good family. I both can, andwill, make this exchange for you, by giving you the finest and mostprecious piece of plate in all my house. It is a mixing-bowl byVulcan's own hand, of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaidwith gold. Phaedimus, king of the Sidonians, gave it me in thecourse of a visit which I paid him when I returned thither on myhomeward journey. I will make you a present of it."

  • 龙津 08-09

      "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."

  • 蒋国华 08-08

       "Antinous, insolent and wicked schemer, they say you are the bestspeaker and counsellor of any man your own age in Ithaca, but youare nothing of the kind. Madman, why should you try to compass thedeath of Telemachus, and take no heed of suppliants, whose witnessis Jove himself? It is not right for you to plot thus against oneanother. Do you not remember how your father fled to this house infear of the people, who were enraged against him for having gonewith some Taphian pirates and plundered the Thesprotians who were atpeace with us? They wanted to tear him in pieces and eat up everythinghe had, but Ulysses stayed their hands although they wereinfuriated, and now you devour his property without paying for it, andbreak my heart by his wooing his wife and trying to kill his son.Leave off doing so, and stop the others also."

  • 王仁贵 08-06

    {  "Go to the house, and kill the best pig that you can find fordinner. Meanwhile I want to see whether my father will know me, orfail to recognize me after so long an absence."

  • 阎炳武 08-06

      She heeded her son's words, washed her face, changed her dress,and vowed full and sufficient hecatombs to all the gods if theywould only vouchsafe her revenge upon the suitors.

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