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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陈德荣 大小:tr2cfPGF61720KB 下载:Bf8iw4gI25509次
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日期:2020-08-07 22:03:10
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Madam, wife of Ulysses, Telemachus does not understand thesethings; listen therefore to me, for I can divine them surely, and willhide nothing from you. May Jove the king of heaven be my witness,and the rites of hospitality, with that hearth of Ulysses to which Inow come, that Ulysses himself is even now in Ithaca, and, eithergoing about the country or staying in one place, is enquiring into allthese evil deeds and preparing a day of reckoning for the suitors. Isaw an omen when I was on the ship which meant this, and I toldTelemachus about it."
2.  Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."
3.  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'
4.  They all held their peace except King Alcinous, who began, "Sir,we have had much pleasure in hearing all that you have told us, fromwhich I understand that you are willing to show your prowess, ashaving been displeased with some insolent remarks that have beenmade to you by one of our athletes, and which could never have beenuttered by any one who knows how to talk with propriety. I hope youwill apprehend my meaning, and will explain to any be one of yourchief men who may be dining with yourself and your family when you gethome, that we have an hereditary aptitude for accomplishments of allkinds. We are not particularly remarkable for our boxing, nor yet aswrestlers, but we are singularly fleet of foot and are excellentsailors. We are extremely fond of good dinners, music, and dancing; wealso like frequent changes of linen, warm baths, and good beds, sonow, please, some of you who are the best dancers set about dancing,that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as sailors, runners, dancers,minstrels. Demodocus has left his lyre at my house, so run some one orother of you and fetch it for him."
5.  Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."
6.  "'Sir,' he answered with a groan, 'it was all bad luck, and my ownunspeakable drunkenness. I was lying asleep on the top of Circe'shouse, and never thought of coming down again by the great staircasebut fell right off the roof and broke my neck, so my soul down tothe house of Hades. And now I beseech you by all those whom you haveleft behind you, though they are not here, by your wife, by the fatherwho brought you up when you were a child, and by Telemachus who is theone hope of your house, do what I shall now ask you. I know thatwhen you leave this limbo you will again hold your ship for the Aeaeanisland. Do not go thence leaving me unwaked and unburied behind you,or I may bring heaven's anger upon you; but burn me with whateverarmour I have, build a barrow for me on the sea shore, that may tellpeople in days to come what a poor unlucky fellow I was, and plantover my grave the oar I used to row with when I was yet alive and withmy messmates.' And I said, 'My poor fellow, I will do all that youhave asked of me.'

计划指导

1.  He found her at home. There was a large fire burning on thehearth, and one could smell from far the fragrant reek of burningcedar and sandal wood. As for herself, she was busy at her loom,shooting her golden shuttle through the warp and singingbeautifully. Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar,and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds hadbuilt their nests- owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupytheir business in the waters. A vine loaded with grapes was trainedand grew luxuriantly about the mouth of the cave; there were also fourrunning rills of water in channels cut pretty close together, andturned hither and thither so as to irrigate the beds of violets andluscious herbage over which they flowed. Even a god could not helpbeing charmed with such a lovely spot, so Mercury stood still andlooked at it; but when he had admired it sufficiently he went insidethe cave.
2.  "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."
3.  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."
4.  ULYSSES slept in the cloister upon an undressed bullock's hide, onthe top of which he threw several skins of the sheep the suitors hadeaten, and Eurynome threw a cloak over him after he had laid himselfdown. There, then, Ulysses lay wakefully brooding upon the way inwhich he should kill the suitors; and by and by, the women who hadbeen in the habit of misconducting themselves with them, left thehouse giggling and laughing with one another. This made Ulysses veryangry, and he doubted whether to get up and kill every single one ofthem then and there, or to let them sleep one more and last timewith the suitors. His heart growled within him, and as a bitch withpuppies growls and shows her teeth when she sees a stranger, so didhis heart growl with anger at the evil deeds that were being done: buthe beat his breast and said, "Heart, be still, you had worse than thisto bear on the day when the terrible Cyclops ate your bravecompanions; yet you bore it in silence till your cunning got yousafe out of the cave, though you made sure of being killed."
5.  Meanwhile the bard began to sing the loves of Mars and Venus, andhow they first began their intrigue in the house of Vulcan. Marsmade Venus many presents, and defiled King Vulcan's marriage bed, sothe sun, who saw what they were about, told Vulcan. Vulcan was veryangry when he heard such dreadful news, so he went to his smithybrooding mischief, got his great anvil into its place, and began toforge some chains which none could either unloose or break, so thatthey might stay there in that place. When he had finished his snare hewent into his bedroom and festooned the bed-posts all over with chainslike cobwebs; he also let many hang down from the great beam of theceiling. Not even a god could see them, so fine and subtle werethey. As soon as he had spread the chains all over the bed, he made asthough he were setting out for the fair state of Lemnos, which ofall places in the world was the one he was most fond of. But Mars keptno blind look out, and as soon as he saw him start, hurried off to hishouse, burning with love for Venus.
6.  "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.

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1.  "And the goddess answered, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, you shallnone of you stay here any longer if you do not want to, but there isanother journey which you have got to take before you can sailhomewards. You must go to the house of Hades and of dread Proserpineto consult the ghost of the blind Theban prophet Teiresias whosereason is still unshaken. To him alone has Proserpine left hisunderstanding even in death, but the other ghosts flit aboutaimlessly.'
2.  So Eumaeus went up to him and said, "Stranger, Telemachus sendsyou this, and says you are to go the round of the suitors begging, forbeggars must not be shamefaced."
3.  "I know, and understand you," replied Ulysses; "you need say nomore. Let us be going, but if you have a stick ready cut, let mehave it to walk with, for you say the road is a very rough one."
4.  "She at once called her husband Antiphates from the place ofassembly, and forthwith he set about killing my men. He snatched upone of them, and began to make his dinner off him then and there,whereon the other two ran back to the ships as fast as ever theycould. But Antiphates raised a hue and cry after them, and thousandsof sturdy Laestrygonians sprang up from every quarter- ogres, not men.They threw vast rocks at us from the cliffs as though they had beenmere stones, and I heard the horrid sound of the ships crunching upagainst one another, and the death cries of my men, as theLaestrygonians speared them like fishes and took them home to eatthem. While they were thus killing my men within the harbour I drew mysword, cut the cable of my own ship, and told my men to row with alftheir might if they too would not fare like the rest; so they laid outfor their lives, and we were thankful enough when we got into openwater out of reach of the rocks they hurled at us. As for the othersthere was not one of them left.
5.   "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.
6.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.

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1.  Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.
2.  "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."
3.  On this Minerva came close up to him and said, "Son of Arceisius-best friend I have in the world- pray to the blue-eyed damsel, andto Jove her father; then poise your spear and hurl it."
4、  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."
5、  "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.

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  • 塔克·布朗 08-06

      Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."

  • 库兹曼诺维奇 08-06

      Calypso trembled with rage when she heard this, "You gods," sheexclaimed, to be ashamed of yourselves. You are always jealous andhate seeing a goddess take a fancy to a mortal man, and live withhim in open matrimony. So when rosy-fingered Dawn made love toOrion, you precious gods were all of you furious till Diana went andkilled him in Ortygia. So again when Ceres fell in love with Iasion,and yielded to him in a thrice ploughed fallow field, Jove came tohear of it before so long and killed Iasion with his thunder-bolts.And now you are angry with me too because I have a man here. I foundthe poor creature sitting all alone astride of a keel, for Jove hadstruck his ship with lightning and sunk it in mid ocean, so that allhis crew were drowned, while he himself was driven by wind and waveson to my island. I got fond of him and cherished him, and had set myheart on making him immortal, so that he should never grow old all hisdays; still I cannot cross Jove, nor bring his counsels to nothing;therefore, if he insists upon it, let the man go beyond the seasagain; but I cannot send him anywhere myself for I have neitherships nor men who can take him. Nevertheless I will readily give himsuch advice, in all good faith, as will be likely to bring himsafely to his own country."

  • 王泽旭 08-06

       "I was not there," answered Euryclea, "and do not know; I only heardthem groaning while they were being killed. We sat crouching andhuddled up in a corner of the women's room with the doors closed, tillyour son came to fetch me because his father sent him. Then I foundUlysses standing over the corpses that were lying on the ground allround him, one on top of the other. You would have enjoyed it if youcould have seen him standing there all bespattered with blood andfilth, and looking just like a lion. But the corpses are now all piledup in the gatehouse that is in the outer court, and Ulysses has lita great fire to purify the house with sulphur. He has sent me tocall you, so come with me that you may both be happy together afterall; for now at last the desire of your heart has been fulfilled; yourhusband is come home to find both wife and son alive and well, andto take his revenge in his own house on the suitors who behaved sobadly to him."

  • 曹正平 08-06

      "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.

  • 符樱 08-05

    {  Thus conversing the two made their way towards the house. Whenthey got there they found Telemachus with the stockman and theswineherd cutting up meat and mixing wine with water. Then the oldSicel woman took Laertes inside and washed him and anointed him withoil. She put him on a good cloak, and Minerva came up to him andgave him a more imposing presence, making him taller and stouterthan before. When he came back his son was surprised to see himlooking so like an immortal, and said to him, "My dear father, someone of the gods has been making you much taller and better-looking."

  • 陈青松 08-04

      "'Come here,' they sang, 'renowned Ulysses, honour to the Achaeanname, and listen to our two voices. No one ever sailed past us withoutstaying to hear the enchanting sweetness of our song- and he wholistens will go on his way not only charmed, but wiser, for we knowall the ills that the gods laid upon the Argives and Trojans beforeTroy, and can tell you everything that is going to happen over thewhole world.'}

  • 莫罗 08-04

      And Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, if, then,the gods now mean that Ulysses should get home, we should first sendMercury to the Ogygian island to tell Calypso that we have made up ourminds and that he is to return. In the meantime I will go to Ithaca,to put heart into Ulysses' son Telemachus; I will embolden him to callthe Achaeans in assembly, and speak out to the suitors of his motherPenelope, who persist in eating up any number of his sheep and oxen; Iwill also conduct him to Sparta and to Pylos, to see if he can hearanything about the return of his dear father- for this will makepeople speak well of him."

  • 刘宾 08-04

      The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.

  • 李明胜 08-03

       "This hound," answered Eumaeus, "belonged to him who has died in afar country. If he were what he was when Ulysses left for Troy, hewould soon show you what he could do. There was not a wild beast inthe forest that could get away from him when he was once on itstracks. But now he has fallen on evil times, for his master is deadand gone, and the women take no care of him. Servants never do theirwork when their master's hand is no longer over them, for Jove takeshalf the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him."

  • 李辉 08-01

    {  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.

  • 黄韵玲 08-01

      "I too, my son," said she, "have something for you as a keepsakefrom the hand of Helen; it is for your bride to wear upon herwedding day. Till then, get your dear mother to keep it for you;thus may you go back rejoicing to your own country and to your home."

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