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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:许鑫 大小:O78TgfjW68874KB 下载:gUp9eV9M53721次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:XvBKGvQZ91752条
日期:2020-08-03 20:24:48
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郭心刚

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewerand poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, andshe drew a clean table beside them. An upper servant brought thembread, and offered them many good things of what there was in thehouse, the carver fetched them plates of all manner of meats and setcups of gold by their side, and a man-servant brought them wine andpoured it out for them.
2.  "Fountain nymphs," he cried, "children of Jove, if ever Ulyssesburned you thigh bones covered with fat whether of lambs or kids,grant my prayer that heaven may send him home. He would soon put anend to the swaggering threats with which such men as you go aboutinsulting people-gadding all over the town while your flocks are goingto ruin through bad shepherding."
3.  On this Ulysses began to move off, and said, "Your looks, my finesir, are better than your breeding; if you were in your own houseyou would not spare a poor man so much as a pinch of salt, forthough you are in another man's, and surrounded with abundance, youcannot find it in you to give him even a piece of bread."
4.  "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'
5.  And Ulysses answered, "I understand and heed. Go in first andleave me here where I am. I am quite used to being beaten and havingthings thrown at me. I have been so much buffeted about in war andby sea that I am case-hardened, and this too may go with the rest. Buta man cannot hide away the cravings of a hungry belly; this is anenemy which gives much trouble to all men; it is because of thisthat ships are fitted out to sail the seas, and to make war upon otherpeople."
6.  "Then send him away," said Mercury, "or Jove will be angry withyou and punish you"'

计划指导

1.  "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.
2.  He found her at home. There was a large fire burning on thehearth, and one could smell from far the fragrant reek of burningcedar and sandal wood. As for herself, she was busy at her loom,shooting her golden shuttle through the warp and singingbeautifully. Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar,and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds hadbuilt their nests- owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupytheir business in the waters. A vine loaded with grapes was trainedand grew luxuriantly about the mouth of the cave; there were also fourrunning rills of water in channels cut pretty close together, andturned hither and thither so as to irrigate the beds of violets andluscious herbage over which they flowed. Even a god could not helpbeing charmed with such a lovely spot, so Mercury stood still andlooked at it; but when he had admired it sufficiently he went insidethe cave.
3.  "I wish it may prove so," answered Telemachus. "If it does, I willshow you so much good will and give you so many presents that allwho meet you will congratulate you."
4.  "We will be sure, sir," answered Telemachus, "to tell him everythingas soon as we see him. I wish I were as certain of finding Ulyssesreturned when I get back to Ithaca, that I might tell him of thevery great kindness you have shown me and of the many beautifulpresents I am taking with me."
5.  But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.
6.  "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying hisdamages, I will pay you myself." So Vulcan answered, "In this case Icannot and must not refuse you."

推荐功能

1.  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."
2.  With these words she flew away like a bird into the air, but she hadgiven Telemachus courage, and had made him think more than everabout his father. He felt the change, wondered at it, and knew thatthe stranger had been a god, so he went straight to where thesuitors were sitting.
3.  "Thus she both was, and still is, respected beyond measure by herchildren, by Alcinous himself, and by the whole people, who lookupon her as a goddess, and greet her whenever she goes about the city,for she is a thoroughly good woman both in head and heart, and whenany women are friends of hers, she will help their husbands also tosettle their disputes. If you can gain her good will, you may haveevery hope of seeing your friends again, and getting safely back toyour home and country."
4.  BOOK IX.
5.   And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.
6.  And Penelope answered, "Stranger, dreams are very curious andunaccountable things, and they do not by any means invariably cometrue. There are two gates through which these unsubstantial fanciesproceed; the one is of horn, and the other ivory. Those that comethrough the gate of ivory are fatuous, but those from the gate of hornmean something to those that see them. I do not think, however, thatmy own dream came through the gate of horn, though I and my son shouldbe most thankful if it proves to have done so. Furthermore I say-and lay my saying to your heart- the coming dawn will usher in theill-omened day that is to sever me from the house of Ulysses, for I amabout to hold a tournament of axes. My husband used to set up twelveaxes in the court, one in front of the other, like the stays uponwhich a ship is built; he would then go back from them and shoot anarrow through the whole twelve. I shall make the suitors try to do thesame thing, and whichever of them can string the bow most easily,and send his arrow through all the twelve axes, him will I follow, andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly and so abounding inwealth. But even so, I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."

应用

1.  Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."
2.  "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."
3.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."
4、  They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."
5、  "And now, O queen, have pity upon me, for you are the first person Ihave met, and I know no one else in this country. Show me the way toyour town, and let me have anything that you may have brought hitherto wrap your clothes in. May heaven grant you in all things yourheart's desire- husband, house, and a happy, peaceful home; forthere is nothing better in this world than that man and wife should beof one mind in a house. It discomfits their enemies, makes thehearts of their friends glad, and they themselves know more about itthan any one."

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  • 陈昌源 08-02

      "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"

  • 段君侠 08-02

      "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captives. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war-cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with soldiers horse and foot, and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them; as for myself, they gave me to a friend who met them,to take to Cyprus, Dmetor by name, son of Iasus, who was a great manin Cyprus. Thence I am come hither in a state of great misery."

  • 杨绍文 08-02

       "The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which thepeople draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, tillpresently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetchwater, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates. Shewas going to the fountain Artacia from which the people bring in theirwater, and when my men had come close up to her, they asked her whothe king of that country might be, and over what kind of people heruled; so she directed them to her father's house, but when they gotthere they found his wife to be a giantess as huge as a mountain,and they were horrified at the sight of her.

  • 陈小龙 08-02

      This was his story, but Ulysses went on eating and drinkingravenously without a word, brooding his revenge. When he had eatenenough and was satisfied, the swineherd took the bowl from which heusually drank, filled it with wine, and gave it to Ulysses, who waspleased, and said as he took it in his hands, "My friend, who was thismaster of yours that bought you and paid for you, so rich and sopowerful as you tell me? You say he perished in the cause of KingAgamemnon; tell me who he was, in case I may have met with such aperson. Jove and the other gods know, but I may be able to give younews of him, for I have travelled much."

  • 吴俊 08-01

    {  Telemachus answered, "The fault, father, is mine, and mine only; Ileft the store room door open, and they have kept a sharper look outthan I have. Go, Eumaeus, put the door to, and see whether it is oneof the women who is doing this, or whether, as I suspect, it isMelanthius the son of Dolius."

  • 彭斌韬 07-31

      "Goddess," replied Ulysses, "do not be angry with me about this. Iam quite aware that my wife Penelope is nothing like so tall or sobeautiful as yourself. She is only a woman, whereas you are animmortal. Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothingelse. If some god wrecks me when I am on the sea, I will bear it andmake the best of it. I have had infinite trouble both by land andsea already, so let this go with the rest."}

  • 奚治国 07-31

      Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."

  • 万爱花 07-31

      "Having so said she dived under the waves, whereon I turned backto the place where my ships were ranged upon the shore; and my heartwas clouded with care as I went along. When I reached my ship we gotsupper ready, for night was falling, and camped down upon the beach.

  • 法兰 07-30

       Another said, "I hope he may be no more successful in other thingsthan he is likely to be in stringing this bow."

  • 朱翠平 07-28

    {  "As for me I live out of the way here with the pigs, and never go tothe town unless when Penelope sends for me on the arrival of some newsabout Ulysses. Then they all sit round and ask questions, both thosewho grieve over the king's absence, and those who rejoice at itbecause they can eat up his property without paying for it. For my ownpart I have never cared about asking anyone else since the time when Iwas taken in by an Aetolian, who had killed a man and come a longway till at last he reached my station, and I was very kind to him. Hesaid he had seen Ulysses with Idomeneus among the Cretans, refittinghis ships which had been damaged in a gale. He said Ulysses wouldreturn in the following summer or autumn with his men, and that hewould bring back much wealth. And now you, you unfortunate old man,since fate has brought you to my door, do not try to flatter me inthis way with vain hopes. It is not for any such reason that I shalltreat you kindly, but only out of respect for Jove the god ofhospitality, as fearing him and pitying you."

  • 马鼎盛 07-28

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."

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