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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:汪春才 大小:ZembI94965322KB 下载:lRg5SNpE99817次
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日期:2020-08-10 01:57:42
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李玉兰

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  There lived sometime in the kingdome of France, a Gentleman namedIsnarde, being the Count of Roussillion: who because hee wascontinually weake, crazie, and sickly, kept a Physitian daily in hishouse, who was called Master Gerard of Narbona. Count Isnarde hadone onely Sonne, very young in yeares, yet of towardly hope, faire,comely, and of pleasing person, named Bertrand; with whom, manyother children of his age, had their education: and among them, adaughter of the fore-named Physitian, called juliet; who, even inthese tender yeares, fixed her affection upon young Bertrand, withsuch an earnest and intimate resolution, as was most admirable in soyong a Maiden, and more then many times is noted in yeares ofgreater discretion. Old Count Isnarde dying, young Bertrand fell asa Ward to the King, and being sent to Paris, remained there underhis royall custodie and protection, to no little discomfort of youngJuliet, who became greevously afflicted in minde, because she had lostthe company of Bertrand.
2.  Then let me live content, to be thus painde.
3.  Certaldo, as (perhaps) you know, or have heard, is a Village inthe Vale of Elsa, and under the authority and commaund of ourFlorence, which although it be but small: yet (in former times) ithath bin inhabited with Gentlemen, and people of especiall respect.A religious Friar of S. Anthonies Order, named Friar Onyon, had longtime used to resort thither, to receive the benevolent almes, whichthose charitably affected people in simplicity gave him, and chieflyat divers daies of the year, when their bounty and devotion wouldextend themselves more largely then at other seasons. And so muchthe rather, because they thought him to be a good Pastor of holylife in outward appearance, and carried a name of much greater matter,then remained in the man indeed; beside, that part of the countryyeilded far more plentifull abundance of Onyons, then all other inTuscany elsewhere, a kinde of foode greatly affected by thoseFriars, as men alwaies of hungry and good appetite. This Friar Onyonwas a man of litle stature red haire, a chearfull countenance, and theworld afforded not a more crafty companion, then he. Moreover,albeit he had very little knowledge or learning, yet he was so prompt,ready and voluble of speech, uttering often he knew not what himselfe:that such as were not wel acquainted with his qualities, supposedhim to be a singular Rhetoritian, excelling Cicero or Quintilianthemselves; and he was a gossip, friend, or deerely affected, by everyone dwelling in those parts. According to his wonted custome, one timehe went thither in the month of August, and on a Sunday morning,when all the dwellers thereabout, were present to heare Masse, andin the chiefest Church above all the rest: when the Friar saw timeconvenient for his purpose, he advanced himselfe, and began tospeake in this manner.
4.  When Blondello was thus parted from him, Guiotto folowed not farreoff behind him, to behold the issue of this angry businesse; andSignior Phillippo, because he could not catch the Porter, continuedmuch distempred, fretting and fuming, in regard he could notcomprehend the meaning of the Porters message: but onely surmized,that Blondello (by the procurement of some body else) had done this inscorne of him.
5.  Now, in regard that among all other naturall things, no one is lessesubject to take counsell, or can be wrought to contrariety, then Love,whose nature is such, as rather to run upon his owne rash consumption,then to be ruled by admonitions of the very wisest: my memory hathinspired it selfe, with matter incident to this purpose, effectuallyto approve, what I have already said. For I am now to speake of awoman who would appeare to have more wit, then either she hadindeed, or appertained to her by any title. The matter also, whereinshe would needs shew her studious judgement and capacity, was ofmuch more consequence then she could deserve to meddle withall. Yetsuch was the issue of her fond presuming; that (in one instant) sheexpelled both love, and the soule of her owne sonne out of his body,where (doubtlesse) it was planted by divine favour and appointment.
6.  To die for him, it is my sole desire,

计划指导

1.  Madam Lauretta, sitting next to Madam Pampinea, and seeing howtriumphantly she had finished her discourse; without attending anything else, spake thus. Gracious Ladies, we shall never behold (inmine opinion) a greater act of Fortune, then to see a man so suddainlyexalted, even from the lowest depth of poverty, to a Royall estateof dignity; as the discourse of Madam Pampinea hath made good, bythe happy advancement of Alessandro. And because it appearethnecessary, that whosoever discourseth on the subject proposed,should no way vary from the very same termes; I shall not shame totell a tale, which, though it containe far greater mishapes then theformer, may sort to as happy an issue, albeit not so noble andmagnificent. In which respect, it may (perhaps) merit the lesseattention; but howsoever that fault shall be found in you, I meaneto discharge mine owne duty.
2.  Well may you imagine, that this was no small comfort to the pooreaged Countes heart, yet would he not make himselfe knowne to him, orany other about him, but referred his joy to a further enlarging anddiminishing, by sight of the other limbe of his life, his deerelyaffected daughter Gianetta, denying rest to his bodie in any place,until such time as he came to London. Making there secret enquiryconcerning the Ladie with whom hee had left his daughter; heeunderstoode, that a young Gentlewoman, named Gianetta, was marriedto that Ladies onely Son, which made a second addition of joy to hissoule, accounting all his passed adversities of no valew, both hischildren being living, and in so high honour.
3.  Perceiving that she could not have the pot againe, she fell intoan extreame sicknesse, occasioned onely by her ceaselesse weeping: andnever urged she to have any thing, but the restoring of her Basilepot. Her brethren grew greatly amazed thereat, because she nevercalledfor ought else beside; and thereupon were very desirous to ransackethe pot to the very bottome. Having emptied out all the earth, theyfound the Scarfe of silke, wherein the head of Lorenzo was wrapped;which was (as yet) not so much consumed, but by the lockes of haire,they knew it to be Lorenzoes head, whereat they became confounded withamazement.
4.  By meanes of a neere dwelling neighbour (that was his very deare andintimate friend) he came acquainted with every part of the house,and prevailed so far, that one evening, when she and her husbandsupt at a neighbours house; he compassed accesse into the same bedchamber, where Silvestra used most to lodge. Finding the Curtainesready drawne, he hid himselfe behinde them on the further side ofthe bed, and so tarried there untill Silvestra and her husband werereturned home, and laide downe in bed to take their rest. The husbandssences were soone overcome with sleepe, by reason of his painefulltoyling all the day, and bodies that are exercised with much labour,are the more desirous to have ease.
5.  It came so to passe, that it being now the delightfull Summerseason, when all Gentlemen and Gentlewomen used to meete together(according to a custome long observed in that Country) sportingalong on the Sea Coast, dining and supping there very often, RicciardoMinutolo happened to heare, that Madam Catulla (with a company ofher friends) intended also to be present there among them; at whichtime, consorted with a seemely traine of his confederates, he resortedthither, and was graciously welcommed by Madam Catulla, where hepretended no willing long time of tarrying, but that Catulla and theother Ladies were faine to entreate him, discoursing of his love tohis new elected Mistresse: which Minutolo graced with so solemne acountenance, as it ministred much more matter of conference, allcoveting to know what she was.
6.  After that Madame Fiammetta had given over speaking, and all theAuditory had sufficiently applauded the Schollers honest revenge,the Queene enjoyned Philostratus, to proceede on next with his Novell,which caused him to begin thus. Beleeve me Ladies, it is anexcellent and most commendable thing, to speak well, and to allpurposes: but I hold it a matter of much greater worth, to know how todo it, and when necessity doth most require it. Which a Gentlewoman(of whom I am now to speake) was so well enstructed in, as not onelyit yeelded the hearers mirthfull contentment, but likewise deliveredher from the danger of death, as (in few words) you shal hearerelated.

推荐功能

1.  IN JUST REPROOFE OF SUCH FOOLISH MEN, AS WILL BE GOVERNED BY
2.  After he had made this sleepy water, he put it into a glasse,wherewith it was filled (almost) up to the brimme; and till the timecame when he should use it, hee set it in his owne Chamber-Window,never acquainting any one, to what purpose he had provided thewater, nor what was his reason of setting it there; when it drewtowards the evening, and he was returned home from his pacients, aMessenger brought him Letters from Malfy, concerning a greatconflict happening there betweene two Noble Families, wherein diverswere very dangerously wounded on either side, and without his speedyrepairing thither, it would prove to the losse of many lives.Hereupon, the cure of the mans leg must needs be prolonged, untillhe was returned backe againe, in regard that many of the woundedpersons were his worthy friends, and liberall bounty was there to beexpected, which made him presently go aboord a small Barke, andforthwith set away towards Malfy.
3.  Alas my good Neighbours, you see at what unfitting houres, thisbad man comes home to his house, after hee hath lyen in a Taverneall day drunke, sleeping and snorting like a Swine. You are myhonest witnesses, how long I have suffered this beastlinesse in him,yet neyther your good counsell, nor my too often lovingadrionitions, can worke that good which wee have expected.Wherefore, to try if shame can procure any amendment, I have shuthim out of doores, until his drunken fit be over-past, and so he shallstand to coole his feet.
4.  I hate all such as do complaine,
5.   After they had spent so much time in amorous discoursing, as mightbest fit with this their first meeting, and stand cleare fromsuspition on either side: our Albert Cupid, or Cupid Albert, whichof them you best please to terme him, closing his spangled wingestogether againe behinde his backe, fastening also on his Bow andQuiver of Arrowes, overclouds all with his religious Monkes Cowle, andthen with a parting kisse or two, returned to the place where he hadleft his fellow and companion, perhaps imployed in as devout anexercise, as he had bin in his absence from him; whence both repayringhome to the Monastery, all this nightes wandering was allowed astollerable, by them who made no spare of doing the like.On the morrow following, Madam Lisetta immediately after dinner,being attended by her Chamber-maid, went to see Friar Albert,finding him in his wonted forme and fashion, and telling him whathad hapned betweene her and God Cupid, with all the other lies andtales which hee had told her. Truly Madam (answered Albert) whatyour successe with him hath beene, I am no way able to comprehend; butthis I can assure you, that so soone as I had acquainted him with youranswer, I felt a sodaine rapture made of my soule, and visibly (tomy apprehension) saw it carried by Elves and Fairies, into thefloury fields about Elisium, where Lovers departed out of this life,walke among the beds of Lillies and Roses, such as are not in thisworld to be seene, neither to be imagined by any humane capacity. Sosuper-abounding was the pleasure of this joy and solace, that, howlong I continued there, or by what meanes I was transported hitheragaine this morning, it is beyond all ability in mee to expresse, orhow I assumed my body againe after that great God had made use thereofto your service. Well Fryar Albert (quoth shee) you may see what anhappinesse hath befalne you, by so grosse an opinion of myperfections, and what a felicity you enjoy, and still are like todo, by my pardoning your error, and granting the God accesse to mein your shape: which as I envy not, so I wish you heereafter to bewiser, in taking upon you to judge of beauty. Much other idle follyproceeded from her, which still he soothed to her contentment, and (asoccasion served) many meetings they had in the former manner.
6.  Menghino stayed with his troope, in a neere neighbouring house tothe Mayden, attending when the signall would be given: but Giovanniand his consorts, were ambushed somewhat further off from the house,and both saw when Jacomino went foorth to supper. Now Grinello and theChambermaide began to vary, which should send the other out of theway, till they had effected their severall invention; wheruponGrinello said to her. What maketh thee to walke thus about thehouse, and why doest thou not get thee to bed? And thou (quoth theMaide) why doest thou not goe to attend on our Master, and tarry forhis returning home? I am sure thou hast supt long agoe, and I knowno businesse here in the house for thee to doe. Thus (by no meanes)the one could send away the other, but either remained as the othershinderance.

应用

1.  The simple man, yet not so simple, but seeing that this weekelygreazing the Inquisitors hands, would in time graspe away all hisgold, grew weary of this annointing, and began to consider withhimselfe, how to stay the course of this chargeable penance. Andcomming one morning (according to his injunction) to heare Masse, inthe Gospell he observed these words; You shall receive an hundredfor one, and so possesse eternall life; which saying, he keptperfectly in his memory: and as he was commanded, at dinner time, hecame to the Inquisitor, finding him (among his fellowes) seated at theTable. The Inquisitor presently demaunded of him, whether he had heardMasse that morning, or no? Yes Sir, replyed the man very readily. Hastthou heard any thing therein (quoth the Inquisitor) whereof thou artdoubtfull, or desirst to be further informed? Surely Sir, answered theplaine-meaning man, I make no doubt of any thing I have heard, butdo beleeve all constantly: onely one thing troubleth me much, andmaketh me very compassionate of you, and of all these holy Fathersyour brethren, perceiving in what wofull and wretched estate youwill be, when you shall come into another world. What words are these,quoth the Inquisitor? And why art thou moved to such compassion of us?O good Sir, saide the man, do you remember the wordes in the Gospellthis morning, You shall receive an hundred for one? That is verie truereplyed the Inquisitor, but what mooveth thee to urge those words?I will tell you Sir, answered the plain fellow, so it might pleaseyou not to be offended. Since the time of my resorting hither, Ihave daily seene many poore people at your doore, and (out of yourabundance) when you and your Brethren have fed sufficiently, every onehath had a good messe of Pottage: now Sir, if for every dishfullgiven, you are sure to receive an hundred againe, you will all bemeerely drowned in pottage. Although the rest (sitting at the Tablewith the Inquisitor) laughed heartily at this jest; yet he foundhimselfe toucht in another nature, having hypocritically received forone poore offence, above three hundred peeces of Gold, and not a miteto be restored againe. But fearing to be further disclosed, yetthreatning him with another Processe in law, for abusing the words ofthe Gospel, he was content to dismisse him for altogither, withoutany more golden greasing in the hand.
2.  His fond and foolish carriage stil continuing to this Gentlewoman;she being wise and vertuously advised, spake thus unto him. HolySir, if you love me according as you protest, and manifest by youroutward behaviour: I am the more to thanke you for it, being boundin dutie to love you likewise. But if your Love have any harshe orunsavourie taste, which mine is no way able to endure, neyther dareentertaine in anie kinde whatsoever: you must and shall hold meeexcused, because I am made of no such temper. You are my ghostly andspirituall Father, an Holy Priest. Moreover, yeares have made youhonorably aged; all which severall weighty considerations, ought toconfirme you in continency and chastity. Remember withall (good sir)that I am but a child to you in years, and were I bent to any wantonappetites, you shold justly correct me by fatherly counsell, such asmost beautifieth your sacred profession. Beside, I am a Widdow, andyou are not ignorant, how requisite a thing honestie is in widdowes.Wherefore, pardon mee (Holy Father:) for, in such manner as you makethe motion: I desire you not to love mee, because I neither can orwill at any time so affect you.
3.  Faire Grizelda, if I make you my wife, will you doe your bestendeavour to please me, in all things which I shall doe or say? willyou also be gentle, humble, and patient? with divers other the likequestions: whereto she still answered, that she would, so neere asheaven (with grace) should enable her.
4、  Madam Beritola not knowing (in so sudden and strange an alterationof State affaires) what was become of her Husband, fearing alsogreatly before, those inconveniences which afterward followed; beingovercome with many passionate considerations, having left and forsakenall her goods, going aboord a small Barke with a Sonne of hers, agedabout some eight yeeres, named Geoffrey, and growne great with childwith another, she fled thence to Lapary, where she was brought tobed of another Sonne, whom she named (answerable both to his and herhard fortune,) The poore expelled.
5、  This beautiful Lady, beeing very modest and vertuously inclined, washighly affected by a Noble Baron of those parts, tearmed by the nameof Signior Ansaldo Gradense; a man of very great spirit, bountifull,active in Armes, and yet very affable and courteous, which causedhim to be the better respected. His love to this Lady wasextraordinary, hardly to bee contained within any moderate compasse,striving to bee in like manner affected of her: to which end, shewanted no daily solicitings, Letters, Ambassages and Love-tokens,all proving to no purpose.

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  • 董云很 08-09

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE TENTH NOVELL

  • 梁诗 08-09

      Opinion hath made it famous for long time, that the Seacoast ofRhegium to Gaieta, is the onely delactable part of all Italy, wherein,somewhat neere to Salerno, is a shore looking upon the Sea, whichthe inhabitants there dwelling, doe call the coast of Malfy, full ofsmall Townes, Gardens, Springs, and wealthy men, trading in as manykindes of Merchandizes, as any other people that I know. Among whichTownes, there is one, named Ravello, wherein (as yet to this day thereare rich people) there was (not long since) a very wealthy man,named Landolpho Ruffolo, who being not contented with his riches,but coveting to multiply them double and trebble, fell in danger, toloose both himselfe and wealth together. This man (as otherMerchants are wont to doe) after hee had considered on his affaires,bought him a very goodly Ship, lading it with divers sorts ofMerchandizes, all belonging to himselfe onely, and making his voyageto the Isle of Cyprus. Where he found, over and beside theMerchandizes he had brought thither, many Ships more there arrived,and all laden with the same commodities, in regard whereof, it wasneedefull for him, not onely to make a good Mart of his goods; butalso was further constrained (if hee meant to vent his commodities) tosell them away (almost) for nothing, endangering his utter destructionand overthrow. Whereupon, grieving exceedingly at so great a losse,not knowing what to doe, and seeing, that from very aboundantwealth, hee was likely to fall into as low poverty: he resolved todie, or to recompence his losses upon others, because he would notreturne home poore, having departed thence so rich.

  • 刘源浩 08-09

       ERROURS IN OTHERS, WHICH REMAINE IN THEMSELVES, COMMONLY ARE

  • 甘靖康 08-09

      "I cannot count unto you, how many there have beene, who (againstthe will of their Fathers) have made choice of their husbands; northem that have fled away with their lovers into strange Countries,being first friends, before they were wives:

  • 高锦武 08-08

    {  Constantine being seated at the Table, hee began (as oneconfounded with admiration) to observe her judiciously, affirmingsecretly to his soule that he had never seene so compleat a womanbefore; and allowing it for justice, that the Duke or any otherwhosoever, if (to enjoy so rare a beauty) they had committedtreason, or any mischeefe els beside, yet in reason they ought to beheld excused. Nor did he bestow so many lookes upon her, but hispraises infinitely surpassed them, as thinking that he could notsufficiently commend her, following the Duke step by step inaffection; for being now growne amorous of her, and remembrance of theintended warre utterly abandoned; no other thoughts could comeneerer him but how to bereave the Duke of her, yet concealing hislove, and not imparting it to any one.

  • 李系工 08-07

      EASIE A MATTER IT IS TO ABUSE AND BEGUILE THEM}

  • 江浪莎 08-07

      The Pilgrime discoursed to her, even from the one end to theother, the history of her husbands sad disasters, telling her, howmany yeeres since she was espoused to him, and many other importantmatters, which well shee knew, and was greatly amazed thereat,thinking him verily to be a Prophet, and kneeling at his feete,entreated him very earnestly, that if he were come to deliver herFather Aldobrandino from death, to doe it speedily, because the timewas very short. The Pilgrime appearing to be a man of great holinesse,saide. Rise up Madame, refraine from weeping, and observeattentively what I shall say; yet with this caution, that you neverreveale it to any person whatsoever. This tribulation whereinto youare falne, (as by revelation I am faithfully informed) is for agrievous sinne by you heretofore committed, whereof divine mercy iswilling to purge you, and to make a perfect amends by a sensiblefeeling of this affliction; as seeking your sound and absoluterecovery, least you fall into farre greater danger then before. Goodman (quoth shee) I am burthened with many sinnes, and doe not know forwhich any amends should be made by me; any one sooner then other:wherefore if you have intelligence thereof, for charities sake tell itme, and I will doe so much as lieth in me, to make a full satisfactionfor it. Madame, answered the Pilgrime, I know well enough what itis, and will demand it no more of you, to winne any furtherknowledge thereof, then I have already: but because in revealing ityour selfe, it may touch you with the more true compunction ofsoule; let us goe to the point indeede, and tell mee, doe youremember, that at any time you were married to an Husband, or no?

  • 袁大头 08-07

      Earely on the Sonday Morning, Aurora shewing her selfe bright andlovely; the Sunnes Golden beames beganne to appeare, on the toppesof the neere adjoyning Mountaines; so, that Hearbes, Plants, Trees,and all things else, were verie evidently to be discerned.

  • 徐本一 08-06

       Geloso, more than halfe mad with anger, first, because hee hadlost his supper: next, having sitten almost all the night (which wasextreamely cold and windle) his Armor much mollesting him, and yethe could see no Friar come: when day drew neere, and hee ashamed towatch there any longer; conveighed himselfe to some more convenientplace, where putting off his Armes, and seeming to come from the placeof his Lodging; about the ninth houre, he found his doore open, entredin, and went up the stayres, going to dinner with his Wife. Within awhile after, according as Geloso had ordred the businesse, a youthcame thither, seeming to be the Novice sent from the Confessor, and hebeing admitted to speake with her, demanded, whether shee weretroubled or mollested that night passed, as formerly she had bin,and whether the partie came or no? The Woman, who knew well enough theMessenger (notwithstanding all his formall disguise) made answer: Thatthe party expected, came not: but if hee had come, it was to nopurpose; because her minde was now otherwise altred, albeit shechanged not a jote from her amorous conclusion.

  • 韩海兰 08-04

    {  By sight of such as do allure,

  • 周仁武 08-04

      How sir? (quoth she,) your Barber? Uppon mine Honour, there shallcome no Barber heere. Why Sir, it is such a rotten Tooth, and standethso fairely for my hand: that, without helpe or advice of any Barber,let mee alone for plucking it forth without putting you to any paineat all. Moreover, let me tell you Sir, those Tooth-drawers are so rudeand cruell, in performing such Offices, as my heart cannot endure,that you should come within compasse of their currish courtesie,neither shall you Sir, if you will be ruled by me. If I should failein the manner of their facilitie, yet love and duty hath enstructedme, to forbeare your least paining, which no unmannerly Barber willdo.

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