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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:金国祥 大小:sbx106jm54063KB 下载:nUpIM0Iy32624次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Gp4g9TN595549条
日期:2020-08-03 11:45:40
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  'I think I can explain that circumstance, sir. Agnes andCatherine Johnstone were invited to take tea with some friends atLowton last Thursday, and I gave them leave to put on clean tuckersfor the occasion.'
2.  A little solace came at tea-time, in the shape of a double rationof bread- a whole, instead of a half, slice- with the deliciousaddition of a thin scrape of butter: it was the hebdomadal treat towhich we all looked forward from Sabbath to Sabbath. I generallycontrived to reserve a moiety of this bounteous repast for myself; butthe remainder I was invariably obliged to part with.
3.  'I believe not. And yet it is said the Rochesters have beenrather a violent than a quiet race in their time: perhaps, though,that is the reason they rest tranquilly in their graves now.'
4.  I pronounced his name, offering him at the same time my hand: hetook it, smiling and saying, 'We shall do very well by and by.' Thenhe laid me down, and addressing Bessie, charged her to be very carefulthat I was not disturbed during the night. Having given some furtherdirections, and intimated that he should call again the next day, hedeparted; to my grief: I felt so sheltered and befriended while he satin the chair near my pillow; and as he closed the door after him,all the room darkened and my heart again sank: inexpressible sadnessweighed it down.
5.  'And you came from-?'
6.  Assuming an attitude, she began 'La Ligue des Rats: fable de LaFontaine.' She then declaimed the little piece with an attention topunctuation and emphasis, a flexibility of voice and anappropriateness of gesture, very unusual indeed at her age, andwhich proved she had been carefully trained.

计划指导

1.  'Sarah, come and sleep with me in the nursery; I daren't for mylife be alone with that poor child tonight: she might die; it's such astrange thing she should have that fit: I wonder if she sawanything. Missis was rather too hard.'
2.  In the course of the day I was enrolled a member of the fourthclass, and regular tasks and occupations were assigned me: hitherto, Ihad only been a spectator of the proceedings at Lowood; I was now tobecome an actor therein. At first, being little accustomed to learn byheart, the lessons appeared to me both long and difficult; thefrequent change from task to task, too, bewildered me; and I wasglad when, about three o'clock in the afternoon, Miss Smith put intomy hands a border of muslin two yards long, together with needle,thimble, etc., and sent me to sit in a quiet corner of the schoolroom,with directions to hem the same. At that hour most of the otherswere sewing likewise; but one class still stood round Miss Scatcherd'schair reading, and as all was quiet, the subject of their lessonscould be heard, together with the manner in which each girlacquitted herself, and the animadversions or commendations of MissScatcherd on the performance. It was English history: among thereaders I observed my acquaintance of the verandah: at thecommencement of the lesson, her place had been at the top of theclass, but for some error of pronunciation, or some inattention tostops, she was suddenly sent to the very bottom. Even in thatobscure position, Miss Scatcherd continued to make her an object ofconstant notice; she was continually addressing to her such phrases asthe following:-
3.  'I'll kiss you and welcome: bend your head down.' Bessie stooped;we mutually embraced, and I followed her into the house quitecomforted. That afternoon lapsed in peace and harmony; and in theevening Bessie told me some of her most enchaining stories, and sangme some of her sweetest songs. Even for me life had its gleams ofsunshine.
4.  'Well, but, leaving his land out of the question, do you likehim? Is he liked for himself?'
5.  'Shall I have the pleasure of seeing Miss Fairfax to-night?' Iasked, when I had partaken of what she offered me.
6.  'I am so glad,' she continued, as she sat down opposite to me,and took the cat on her knee; 'I am so glad you are come; it will bequite pleasant living here now with a companion. To be sure it ispleasant at any time; for Thornfield is a fine old hall, ratherneglected of late years perhaps, but still it is a respectableplace; yet you know in winter-time one feels dreary quite alone in thebest quarters. I say alone- Leah is a nice girl to be sure, and Johnand his wife are very decent people; but then you see they are onlyservants, and one can't converse with them on terms of equality: onemust keep them at due distance, for fear of losing one's authority.I'm sure last winter (it was a very severe one, if you recollect,and when it did not snow, it rained and blew), not a creature butthe butcher and postman came to the house, from November tillFebruary; and I really got quite melancholy with sitting night afternight alone; I had Leah in to read to me sometimes; but I don'tthink the poor girl liked the task much: she felt it confining. Inspring and summer one got on better: sunshine and long days makesuch a difference; and then, just at the commencement of thisautumn, little Adela Varens came and her nurse: a child makes ahouse alive all at once; and now you are here I shall be quite gay.'

推荐功能

1.  'Georgiana is handsome, I suppose, Bessie?'
2.  And a tray was soon brought. How pretty, to my eyes, did thechina cups and bright teapot look, placed on the little round tablenear the fire! How fragrant was the steam of the beverage, and thescent of the toast! of which, however, I, to my dismay (for I wasbeginning to be hungry), discerned only a very small portion: MissTemple discerned it too.
3.  This lane inclined up-hill all the way to Hay; having reached themiddle, I sat down on a stile which led thence into a field. Gatheringmy mantle about me, and sheltering my hands in my muff, I did not feelthe cold, though it froze keenly; as was attested by a sheet of icecovering the causeway, where a little brooklet, now congealed, hadoverflowed after a rapid thaw some days since. From my seat I couldlook down on Thornfield: the grey and battlemented hall was theprincipal object in the vale below me; its woods and dark rookery roseagainst the, west. I lingered till the sun went down amongst thetrees, and sank crimson and clear behind them. I then turned eastward.
4.  I took up my muff and walked on. The incident had occurred andwas gone for me: it was an incident of no moment, no romance, nointerest in a sense; yet it marked with change one single hour of amonotonous life. My help had been needed and claimed; I had givenit: I was pleased to have done something; trivial, transitory thoughthe deed was, it was yet an active thing, and I was weary of anexistence all passive. The new face, too, was like a new pictureintroduced to the gallery of memory; and it was dissimilar to allthe others hanging there: firstly, because it was masculine; and,secondly, because it was dark, strong, and stern. I had it stillbefore me when I entered Hay, and slipped the letter into thepost-office; I saw it as I walked fast down-hill all the way home.When I came to the stile, I stopped a minute, looked round andlistened, with an idea that a horse's hoofs might ring on the causewayagain, and that a rider in a cloak, and a Gytrash-like Newfoundlanddog, might be again apparent: I saw only the hedge and a pollardwillow before me, rising up still and straight to meet themoonbeams; I heard only the faintest waft of wind roaming fitful amongthe trees round Thornfield, a mile distant; and when I glanced down inthe direction of the murmur, my eye, traversing the hall-front, caughta light kindling in a window: it reminded me that I was late, and Ihurried on.
5.   A NEW chapter in a novel is something like a new scene in a play;and when I draw up the curtain this time, reader, you must fancy yousee a room in the George Inn at Millcote, with such large figuredpapering on the walls as inn rooms have; such a carpet, suchfurniture, such ornaments on the mantel-piece, such prints,including a portrait of George the Third, and another of the Prince ofWales, and a representation of the death of Wolfe. All this is visibleto you by the light of an oil lamp hanging from the ceiling, and bythat of an excellent fire, near which I sit in my cloak and bonnet; mymuff and umbrella lie on the table, and I am warming away the numbnessand chill contracted by sixteen hours' exposure to the rawness of anOctober day: I left Lowton at four o'clock A.M., and the Millcote townclock is now just striking eight.
6.  'What a dreadful noise! it went quite through me!' exclaimed Abbot.

应用

1.  'No; none that I ever saw.'
2.  Impossible to reply to this in the affirmative: my little worldheld a contrary opinion: I was silent. Mrs. Reed answered for me by anexpressive shake of the head, adding soon, 'Perhaps the less said onthat subject the better, Mr. Brocklehurst.'
3.  Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult,with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. Itseemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled outinto unhoped-for liberty. Not without cause was this sentiment: Mrs.Reed looked frightened; her work had slipped from her knee; she waslifting up her hands, rocking herself to and fro, and even twistingher face as if she would cry.
4、  'Do you feel as if you should sleep, Miss?' asked Bessie, rathersoftly.
5、  I did so, not at first aware what was his intention; but when I sawhim lift and poise the book and stand in act to hurl it, Iinstinctively started aside with a cry of alarm: not soon enough,however; the volume was flung, it hit me, and I fell, striking my headagainst the door and cutting it. The cut bled, the pain was sharp:my terror had passed its climax; other feelings succeeded.

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网友评论(CS1OGjDp59467))

  • 内尔松 08-02

      'Mr. Rochester!' I exclaimed. 'Who is he?'

  • 谢春发 08-02

      They conversed of things I had never heard of; of nations and timespast; of countries far away; of secrets of nature discovered orguessed at: they spoke of books: how many they had read! What storesof knowledge they possessed! Then they seemed so familiar withFrench names and French authors: but my amazement reached its climaxwhen Miss Temple asked Helen if she sometimes snatched a moment torecall the Latin her father had taught her, and taking a book from ashelf, bade her read and construe a page of Virgil; and Helenobeyed, my organ of veneration expanding at every sounding line. Shehad scarcely finished ere the bell announced bedtime! no delay couldbe admitted; Miss Temple embraced us both, saying, as she drew us toher heart-

  • 赫耐尔 08-02

       'What would Uncle Reed say to you, if he were alive?' was myscarcely voluntary demand. I say scarcely voluntary, for it seemedas if my tongue pronounced words, without my will consenting totheir utterance: something spoke out of me over which I had nocontrol.

  • 肖恩·潘 08-02

      She kissed me, and still keeping me at her side (where I was wellcontented to stand for I derived a child's pleasure from thecontemplation of her face, her dress, her one or two ornaments, herwhite forehead, her clustered and shining curls, and beaming darkeyes), she proceeded to address Helen Burns.

  • 刘慧竹 08-01

    {  The refectory was a great, low-ceiled, gloomy room; on two longtables smoked basins of something hot, which, however, to my dismay,sent forth an odour far from inviting. I saw a universal manifestationof discontent when the fumes of the repast met the nostrils of thosedestined to swallow it; from the van of the procession, the tall girlsof the first class, rose the whispered words-

  • 于富斌 07-31

      In five minutes more the cloud of bewilderment dissolved: I knewquite well that I was in my own bed, and that the red glare was thenursery fire. It was night: a candle burnt on the table; Bessiestood at the bed-foot with a basin in her hand, and a gentleman sat ina chair near my pillow, leaning over me.}

  • 海森堡 07-31

      Various duties awaited me on my arrival: I had to sit with thegirls during their hour of study; then it was my turn to read prayers;to see them to bed: afterwards I supped with the other teachers.Even when we finally retired for the night, the inevitable MissGryce was still my companion: we had only a short end of candle in ourcandlestick, and I dreaded lest she should talk till it was allburnt out; fortunately, however, the heavy supper she had eatenproduced a soporific effect: she was already snoring before I hadfinished undressing. There still remained an inch of candle: I nowtook out my letter; the seal was an initial F.; I broke it; thecontents were brief.Thursday, possesses the acquirements mentioned, and if she is in aposition to give satisfactory references as to character andcompetency, a situation can be offered her where there is but onepupil, a little girl, under ten years of age; and where the salaryis thirty pounds per annum. J. E. is requested to send references,name, address, and all particulars to the direction:-

  • 唐建平 07-31

      Miss Gryce snored at last; she was a heavy Welsh-woman, and tillnow her habitual nasal strains had never been regarded by me in anyother light than as a nuisance; to-night I hailed the first deep noteswith satisfaction; I was debarrassed of interruption; myhalf-effaced thought instantly revived.

  • 熊海鸥 07-30

       It was very near, but not yet in sight; when, in addition to thetramp, tramp, I heard a rush under the hedge, and close down by thehazel stems glided a great dog, whose black and white colour madehim a distinct object against the trees. It was exactly one form ofBessie's Gytrash- a lion-like creature with long hair and a huge head:it passed me, however, quietly enough; not staying to look up, withstrange pretercanine eyes, in my face, as I half expected it would.The horse followed,- a tall steed, and on its back a rider. The man,the human being, broke the spell at once. Nothing ever rode theGytrash: it was always alone; and goblins, to my notions, thoughthey might tenant the dumb carcasses of beasts, could scarce covetshelter in the commonplace human form. No Gytrash was this,- only atraveller taking the short cut to Millcote. He passed, and I wenton; a few steps, and I turned: a sliding sound and an exclamation of'What the deuce is to do now?' and a clattering tumble, arrested myattention. Man and horse were down; they had slipped on the sheet ofice which glazed the causeway. The dog came bounding back, andseeing his master in a predicament, and hearing the horse groan,barked till the evening hills echoed the sound, which was deep inproportion to his magnitude. He snuffed round the prostrate group, andthen he ran up to me; it was all he could do,- there was no other helpat hand to summon. I obeyed him, and walked down to the traveller,by this time struggling himself free of his steed. His efforts were sovigorous, I thought he could not be much hurt; but I asked him thequestion-

  • 马斌 07-28

    {  'No; I know I should think well of myself; but that is notenough: if others don't love me I would rather die than live- I cannotbear to be solitary and hated, Helen. Look here; to gain some realaffection from you, or Miss Temple, or any other whom I truly love,I would willingly submit to have the bone of my arm broken, or tolet a bull toss me, or to stand behind a kicking horse, and let itdash its hoof at my chest-'

  • 安吉丽娜 07-28

      'I am so glad,' she continued, as she sat down opposite to me,and took the cat on her knee; 'I am so glad you are come; it will bequite pleasant living here now with a companion. To be sure it ispleasant at any time; for Thornfield is a fine old hall, ratherneglected of late years perhaps, but still it is a respectableplace; yet you know in winter-time one feels dreary quite alone in thebest quarters. I say alone- Leah is a nice girl to be sure, and Johnand his wife are very decent people; but then you see they are onlyservants, and one can't converse with them on terms of equality: onemust keep them at due distance, for fear of losing one's authority.I'm sure last winter (it was a very severe one, if you recollect,and when it did not snow, it rained and blew), not a creature butthe butcher and postman came to the house, from November tillFebruary; and I really got quite melancholy with sitting night afternight alone; I had Leah in to read to me sometimes; but I don'tthink the poor girl liked the task much: she felt it confining. Inspring and summer one got on better: sunshine and long days makesuch a difference; and then, just at the commencement of thisautumn, little Adela Varens came and her nurse: a child makes ahouse alive all at once; and now you are here I shall be quite gay.'

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