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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郑蒙 大小:jr0qNdPs15318KB 下载:jDg2dJwM90834次
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日期:2020-08-09 02:06:33
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秦小平

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Bruno stood musing awhile to himselfe, as if he had some strangestratagem in his braine, and afterward said. Hast thou so muchcorage Calandrino, as but to handle a peece of written parchment,which I will give thee? Yes, that I have answered Calandrino, I hopethat needed not to be doubted. then, saide Bruno, procure that I mayhave a piece of Virgin Parchment brought mee, with a living Bat orReremouse; three graines of Incense, and an hallowed Candle, thenleave me to effect what shal content thee. Calandrino watched allthe next night following, with such preparation as he could make,onely to catch a Bat; which being taken at the last, he broght italive to Bruno (with all the other materials appointed) who taking himalone into a backer Chamber, there hee wrote divers follies on theParchment, in the shape of strange and unusuall Charracters, whichhe delivered to Calandrino, saying: Be bold Calandrino, and buildconstantly uppon my wordes, that if thou canst but touch her with thissacred Charractred charme, she will immediately follow thee, andfulfil whatsoever thou pleasest to command hir. Wherefore, ifPhillippo do this day walke any whither abroad from this house,presume to salute her, in any manner whatsoever it be, and touchingher with the written lines, go presently to the barn of hay, whichthou perceivest so neere adjoyning, the onely convenient place thatcan be, because few or none resort thither. She shall (in despightof her blood) follow thee; and when thou hast her there, I leavethee then to thy valiant victory. Calandrino stood on tiptoe, like aman newly molded by Fortune, and warranted Bruno to fulfil alleffectually.
2.  The worshipfull Judge Messer Niccolao stood all this while on theground; and, in presence of all the beholders, trussed up hisBreeches, as if-hee were new risen out of his bed: when betterbethinking himselfe on the matters indifference, he called for the twomen, who contended for the drawing stockings and the Cloake-bag; butno one could tell what was become of them. Whereupon, he rapt out akinde of Judges oath, saying: I will know whether it be Law or noheere in Florence, to make a Judge sit bare Breecht on the Bench ofJustice, and in the hearing of criminall Causes; whereat the chiefePotestate, and all the standers by laughed heartily.
3.  Having in this manner renewed his wonted amity with her, and withwords farre enough off from all further meaning: Salabetto beganagaine to frequent her company, she expressing all former familiarity,shewing her selfe as lavishly bountifull to him, in all respects asbefore she had done, nay, many times in more magnificent manner.
4.  But I behold
5.  So I can thinke none true, none sure,
6.  I being then made of flesh and blood, and so derived from yourselfe; having had also so little benefit of life, that I am yet in thespring, and blooming time of my blood: by either of these reasons, Imust needs be subject to naturall desires, wherein such knowledge as Ihave once already had, in the estate of my marriage, perhaps mightmove a further intelligence of the like delights, according to thebetter ability of strength, which exceeding all capacity ofresistance, induced a second motive to affection, answerable to mytime and youthfull desires, and so (like a yong woman) I became cameagaine; yet did I strive, even with all my utmost might, and bestvertuous faculties abiding in me, no way to disgrace either you ormy selfe, as (in equall censure) yet have I not done. But Nature isabove all humane power, and Love commanded by Nature, hath prevailedfor Love, joyning with Fortune: in meere pitty and commiseration of myextreame wrong, I found them both most benigne and gracious,teaching mee a way secret enough, whereby I might reach the heightof my desires, howsoever you became instructed, or (perhaps) foundit out by accident; so it was, and I deny it not.

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1.  It is a matter most convenient (deare Ladies) that a man ought tobegin whatsoever he doth, in the great and glorious name of him, whowas the Creator of all things. Wherefore, seeing that I am the manappointed, to begin this your invention of discoursing Novelties: Iintend to begin also with one of his wonderfull workes. To the end,that this being heard, our hope may remaine on him, as the thing onelypermanent, and his name for ever to be praised by us. Now, as there isnothing more certaine, but that even as temporall things are mortalland transitory, so are they both in and out of themselves, full ofsorrow, paine, and anguish, and subjected to infinite dangers: So inthe same manner, we live mingled among them, seeming as part ofthem, and cannot (without some error) continue or defend our selves,if God by his especiall grace and favour, give us not strength andgood understanding. Which power we may not beleeve, that either itdescendeth to us, or liveth in us, by any merites of our owne; butof his onely most gracious benignity. Mooved neverthelesse andentreated by the intercessions of them, who were (as we are)mortals; and having diligently observed his commandements, are nowwith him in eternall blessednes. To whom (as to advocates andprocurators, informed by the experience of our frailty) wee are not topresent our prayers in the presence of so great a Judge; but onelyto himselfe, for the obtaining of all such things as his wisedomeknoweth to be most expedient for us. And well may we credit, thathis goodnesse is more fully enclined towards us, in his continuallbounty and liberality; then the subtilty of mortall eye, can reachinto the secret of so divine a thought: and sometimes therefore we maybe beguiled in opinion, by electing such and such as our intercessorsbefore his high Majesty, who perhaps are farre off from him, or driveninto perpetuall exile, as unworthy to appeare in so glorious apresence. For he, from whom nothing can be hidden, more regardeththe sincerity of him that prayeth, then ignorant devotion, committedto the trust of a heedlesse intercessor; and such prayers have alwaiesgracious acceptation in his sight. As manifestly will appeare, bythe Novell which I intend to relate; manifestly (I say) not as inthe judgement of God, but according to the apprehension of men.
2.  This then is the great evill, the great offence, and the greatinjurie committed by my friend Gisippus, and by mee as a Lover: thatSophronia is secretly become the wife of Titus Quintus Fulvius. Andfor this cause, like spies you watch him, threaten him daily, as ifyou intended to teare him in pieces. What could you doe more, if heehad given her to a man of the very vilest condition? to a villaine, toa slave? What prisons? what fetters? Or what torments are sufficientfor this fact? But leaving these frivolous matters, let us come todiscourse of more moment, and better beseeming your attention.
3.  Pedro was naked from the middle upward, and his hands bound fastbehind him, but being well observed by one of the Ambassadours, aman aged, and of great authority, named Phinio: hee espied a great redspot upon his breast, not painted, or procured by his punishment,but naturally imprinted in the flesh, which women (in these parts)terme the Rose. Upon the sight hereof, he suddenly remembred a Sonneof his owne, which was stolne from him about fifteene yeeres before,by Pyrates on the Sea-coast of Laiazzo, never hearing any tydings ofhim afterward. Upon further consideration, and comparing his Sonnesage with the likelyhood of this poore wretched mans; thus he conferredwith his owne thoughts. If my Sonne (quoth he) be living, his age isequall to this mans time, and by the red blemish on his breast, itplainely speakes him for to bee my Sonne.
4.  The servant departing from her with the child, and reporting theMarquesse what his Lady had said; he wondered at her incomparableconstancy. Then he sent it by the same servant to Bologna, to anhonourable Lady his kinsewoman, requesting her (without revealingwhose child it was) to see it both nobly and carefully educated.
5.  D'Angiers seeing this, and fearing more the malice of theover-credulous Court, then either his owne Conscience, or anydishonourable act by him committed, beleeving likewise, that herslanderous accusation would be credited, above his true andspotlesse innocency: closely he conveyed himselfe out of the Court,making what hast he could, home to his owne house, which being tooweake for warranting his safety upon such pursuite as would be usedagainst him, without any further advice or counsell, he seated his twochildren on horsebacke, himselfe also being but meanly mounted, thusaway thence he went to Calice.
6.  But can you (Sir) say any thing of her? Ancilla, said he, I wouldthou hadst bin in her company, and at the same place where now she is,that some punishment for thy fault might have falne uppon thee, asalready it hath done on her. But beleeve it assuredly, that thou shaltnot freely escape from my fingers, till I have justly paide thee forthy paines, to teach thee to abuse any Gentleman, as thou didst me.

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1.  And come againe some other day.
2.  ALSO, BY WHAT MEANES SUCH WOMEN AS ARE CURST AND SELF-WILLED, MAY
3.  Her Brethren in scornefull manner reprooved her, telling her, thathe was a begger, and had nothing left to keepe him in the world. Iknow it well (quoth she) and am heartily sorry for it. But give me aman that hath neede of wealth, rather then wealth that hath neede of aman. The Brethren hearing how she stood addicted, and knowingFrederigo to be a worthy Gentleman, though poverty had disgraced himin the World: consented thereto, so she bestowed her selfe and herriches on him. He on the other side, having so noble a Lady to hisWife, and the same whom he had so long and deerely loved, submittedall his fairest Fortunes unto her, became a better husband (for theworld) then before, and they lived, and loved together in equall joyand happinesse.
4.  Reynard being thus embraced for Madam Agnesiaes Gossip, and thisproving the onely colourable meanes, for his safer permission ofspeech with her, to let her now understand by word of mouth, what longbefore she collected by his lookes and behaviour: it fell out no waybeneficiall to him, albeit Agnesia seemed not nice or scrupulous inhearing, yet she had a more precious care of her honor. It came topasse, within a while after (whether by seeing his labour vainlyspent, or some other urgent occasion moving him thereto, I know not)Reynard would needs enter into Religion, and whatsoever strictnesse orausteritie hee found to be in that kinde of life, yet he determined topersevere therein, whether it were for his good or ill. And althoughwithin a short space, after he was thus become a Religious Monke,hee seemed to forget the former love which he bare to his gossipAgnesia, and divers other enormous vanities beside: yet let me tellyou, successe of time tutord him in them again(!; and, without anyrespect to his poore ho habite, but rather in contempt thereof (asit were) he tooke an especiall delight, in wearing garments of muchricher esteeme, yet favoured by the same Monasticall profession,appearing (in all respects) like a Court-Minion or Favourite, of asprightly and Poeticall disposition, for composing Verses, Sonnets,and Canzons, singing them to sundry excellent instruments, and yet notgreatly curious of his company, so they were some of the best, andMadame Agnesia one, his former Gossip.
5.   CONCERNING THE SINCERITY OF A LOYALL FRIEND
6.  But Love, from whose bright discerning eies, nothing can be soclosely concealed, but at the length it commeth to light, had madethis amorous Lady mindefull thereof, and because she would not bediscovered in her intention, many dayes together, her soule becameperplexed; by what meanes that strong doore might best be opened,before she could compasse to performe it. But after that she had foundout the way, and gone downe her selfe alone into the cave; observingthe loope-light and had made it commodious for her purpose, she gaveknowledge thereof to Guiscardo, to have him devise an apt course forhis descent, acquainting him truly with the height, and how farre itwas distant from the ground within. After he had found thesouspirall in the hils side, and given it a larger entrance for hissafer passage; he provided a Ladder of cords, with steppessufficient for his descending and ascending, as also a wearing sutemade of leather, to keepe his skinne unscrached of the thornes, and toavoyde all suspition of his resorting thither. In this manner wenthe to the saide loope-hole the night following, and having fastenedthe one end of his corded ladder, to the strong stumpe of a tree beingby it; by meanes of the saide ladder, descended downe into the cave,and there attended the comming of his Lady.

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1.  Calandrino, every minute ready to sinke under his weightieburthen, entred into his owne house, where (by great ill luck) hiswife, being a comely and very honest woman, and named Monna Trista,was standing aloft on the stayres head. She being somewhat angry forhis so long absence, and seeing him come in grunting and groaning,frowningly said. I thought that the divell would never let thee comehome, all the whole Citie have dined, and yet wee must remaine withoutour dinner. When Calandrino heard this, and perceived that he wasnot invisible to his Wife: full of rage and wroth, hee began to raile,saying. Ah thou wicked woman, where art thou? Thou hast utterly undoneme: but (as I live) I will pay thee soundly for it. Up the staireshe ascended into a small Parlour, where when he hadde spred all hisburthen of stones on the floore: he ran to his wife, catching frerby the haire of the head, and throwing her at his feete; giving her somany spurns and cruel blowes, as shee was not able to moove eitherarmes or legges, notwithstanding all her teares, and humblesubmission.
2.  During the times of these occurrences, broad day speeding on, andthe poore man returning homeward by the Rialto, to visit his guestso left in bed: he beheld divers crouds of people, and a generallrumor noysed among them, that God Cupid had bene that night with MadamLisetta, where being over-closely pursued by her Brethren, for feareof being surprized, he leapt out of her window into the gulfe, andno one could tell what was become of him. Heereupon, the poore manbegan to imagine, that the guest entertained by him in the night time,must needs be the same suppose God Cupid, as by his wings and otherembellishments appeared: wherefore being come home, and sittingdowne on the beds side by him, after some few speeches passingbetweene them, he knew him to be Friar Albert, who promised to givehim fifty ducates, if he would not betray him to Lisettaes Brethren.Upon the acceptation of this offer, the money being sent for, andpaied downe; there wanted nothing now, but some apt and convenientmeanes, whereby Albert might safely be conveyed into the Monastery,which being wholly referred to the poore mans care and trust, thushe spake. Sir, I see no likely-hood of your cleare escaping home,except in this manner as I advise you. We observe this day as amerry Festivall, and it is lawfull for any one, to disguise a man inthe skin of a Beare, or in the shape of a savage man, or any otherforme of better advice. Which being so done, he is brought upon S.Markes market place, where being hunted a while with dogs, upon thehuntings conclusion, the Feast is ended; and then each man leadeshis monster whether him pleaseth. If you can accept any of theseshapes, before you be seene heere in my poore abiding, then can Isafely (afterward) bring you where you would be. Otherwise, I see nopossible meanes, how you may escape hence unknown; for it is withoutall question to the contrary, that the Gentlewomans brethren,knowing your concealment in some one place or other, wil set suchspies and watches for you throughout the City, as you must needs betaken by them.
3.  Understand then (Gracious hearers) that in Bologna, a very famousCity of Lombardicy there lived sometime a Knight, most highlyrespected for his vertues, named Signior Gentile de Carisendi, who (inhis yonger dayes) was enamoured of a Gentlewoman, called MadamCatharina, the Wife of Signior Nicoluccio Caccianimico. And becauseduring the time of his amourous pursuite, he found but a sorryenterchange of affection from the Lady; hee went (as hopelesse ofany successe) to be Potestate of Modena, whereto he was called byplace and order.
4、  She knowing what remained to bee done on her behalfe, drewsomewhat neere him, and shewed her selfe more familiar then formerlyshe had done: by which favourable meanes, he touched her with thecharmed Parchment, which was no sooner done; but with out using anyother kinde of language, hee went to the hay-Barne, whitherNicholletta followed him, and both being entred, he closed the Barnedoore, and then stood gazing on her, as if hee had never seene herbefore. Standing stil as in a study, or bethinking himselfe what heshould say: she began to use affable gesture to him, and taking him bythe hand, made shew as if shee meant to kisse him, which yet sherefrained, though he (rather then his life) would gladly have hadit. Why how now deare Calandrino (quoth she) jewell of my joy, comfortof my heart, how many times have I longed for thy sweet Company? Andenjoying it now, according to mine owne desire, dost thou stand like aStatue, or man alla morte? The rare tunes of the Gitterne, but (muchmore) the melodious accents of thy voyce, excelling Orpheus orAmphion, so ravished my soule, as I know not how to expresse the depthof mine affection; and yet hast thou brought me hither, onely to lookebabies in mine eyes, and not so much as speake one kinde word to me?
5、  Under colour of Confession, and of a most pure conscience, a faireyong Gentlewoman, being amourously affected to an honest man,induced a devoute and solemne religious Friar, to advise her in themeanes (without his suspition or perceiving) how to enjoy thebenefit of her friend, and bring her desires to their full effect.

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  • 陈真伟 08-08

      Hereupon, Saladine embracing him, and kissing his forehead, said.All my Gods goe with you, and guard you from any perill, departingso out of the Chamber weeping, and his Baschaes (having likewise takentheir leave of Thorello) followed Saladine into the Hall, whereasthe Bedde stood readily prepared? Because it waxed very late, andthe Magitian also there attending for his dispatch: the Phisitian wentwith the potion to Thorello, and perswading him, in the way offriendship, that it was onely to strengthen him after his greatweaknes: he drank it off, being thereby immediately entraunced, and sopresently sleeping, was (by Saladines command,) laid on thesumptuous and costly Bed, whereon stood an Imperiall Crowne ofinfinite value, appearing (by a description engraven on it) thatSaladine sent it to Madame Adalietta, the wife of Thorello. On hisfinger also hee put a Ring, wherein was enchased an admirableCarbuncle, which seemed like a flaming Torche, the value thereof notto bee estimated. By him likewise hee laid a rich sword, with thegirdle, hangers, and other furniture, such as seldome can be seene thelike. Then hee laid a jewell on the Pillow by him, so sumptuouslieembelished with Pearles and precious Stones, as might have beseemedthe greatest Monarch in the World to weare. Last of all, on eitherside of them, hee set two great Basons of pure Gold, full of doubleducates, many cords of Orient Pearles, Rings, Girdles, and othercostly jewells (over-tedious to bee recounted) and kissing him oncemore as hee lay in the bedde, commanded the Magitian to dispatch andbe gone.

  • 叶延滨 08-08

      As one repeated the words to another throughout the town, itbecame a familiar saying that the most acceptable of all services toGod is to put the Devil in Hell. The saying has crossed the sea andbecome current among us, as it still is.

  • 胡念祖 08-08

       Upon this conclusion, Albert departed, leaving Lisetta in nomeane pride of imagination, that God Cupid should be enamoured ofher beauty; and therefore she thought each houre a yeare, till shemight see him in the mortall shape of Friar Albert. And now was hisbraine wonderfully busied, to visite her in more then common or humanemanner; and therefore he made him a sute (close to his body) ofwhite Taffata, all poudred over with Starres, and spangles of Gold,a Bow and Quiver of Arrowes, with wings also fastened to his backebehinde him, and all cunningly covered with his Friars habit, whichmust be the sole meanes of his safe passage.

  • 亚历杭德罗·埃切瓦里亚及台长马里奥·罗德里格斯·巴尔 08-08

      Having obtained licence of his Superiour, and being accompaniedwith an holy Brother of the Convent, yet ignorant of the businesseby him intended; he went to the house of a friend of his, which washis usuall receptacle, whensoever he went about such deeds of darknes.There did he put on his dissembled habit of God Cupid, with hiswinges, Bowe, and Quiver, in formall fashion; and then (clouded overwith his Monkes Cowle) leaves his companion to awaite his returningbacke, while he visited foolish Lisetta, according to her expectation,readily attending for the Gods arrivall.

  • 樊建川 08-07

    {  When Sicurano heard this horrible lye, immediately shee conceived,that this was the occasion of her husbands hatred to her, and allthe hard haps which she had since suffered: whereupon, shee reputed itfor more then a mortall sinne, if such a villaine should passe withoutdue punishment. Sicurano seemed to like well this report, and grewinto such familiarity with Ambroginolo, that (by her perswasions) whenthe Fayre was ended, she tooke him higher with her into Alexandria,and all his Wares along with him, furnishing him with a fit andconvenient shop, where he made great benefite of his Merchandizes,trusting all his monies in the Captaines custody, because it was thesafest course for him, and so hee continued there with no meanecontentment.

  • 李文英 08-06

      Without imparting his mind unto any one, he would daily passe tooand fro before her doore; which she observing, and havingindifferently wounded him with her wanton piercing lookes: she beganto use the first tricke of her Trade, by pretending her enflamedaffection towards him, which made her pine and consume away in care,except he might be moved to pitty her. Whereupon, she sent one ofher Pandoraes unto him, perfectly instructed in the Art of aMaquerella, who (after many cunning counterfetted sighes, andteares, which she had alwayes ready at command) told him that hiscomely person and compleate perfections, had so wounded the very souleof her Mistresse, as she could enjoy no rest in any place, either byday or night. In regard whereof, she desired (above all things else)to meete with him privately in a Bathe: with which Wordes, shestraightway tooke a Ring forth of her pursse, and in most humblemanner, delivered it unto him, as a token from her Mistresse.}

  • 王升勤 08-06

      Having thus spoken, she fell to weeping, and then thus beganagain. Poore wretched woman as I am, in an unfortunate houre was Iborne, and in a much worse, when I was made thy Wife. I could have hada proper, handsome yong man; one, that would have maintained mee braveand gallantly: but, beast as I was, to forgoe my good, and cast myselfe away on such a beggar as thou art, and whom none wold havehad, but such an Asse as I. Other women live at hearts ease, and injollity, have their amorous friends and loving Paramours, yea, one,two, three at once, making their husbands looke like a Moone cressent,wheron they shine Sun-like, with amiable lookes, because they know nothow to helpe it: when I (poore foole) live heere at home a miserablelife, not daring once to dreame of such follies, an innocent soule,heartlesse and harmelesse.

  • 马详林 08-06

      And Egges laide in mine owne Hennes nest,

  • 王新光 08-05

       During the speeches, an other entred among them, who assuredAniolliero, that Fortarigo was the Thiefe which robde him of hismoney, shewing him also how much hee had lost at the Dice: WherewithAniolliero being much mooved, very angerly reprooved Fortarigo, and,but for feare of the Law, would have offered him outrage, thretning tohave him hangd by the neck, or else condemned to the Gallies belongingto Florence, and so mounted on his horse. Fortarigo making shew to thestanders by, as if Aniolliero menaced some other body, and not him,said. Come Aniolliero, I pray thee let us leave this frivilousprating, for (indeede) it is not worth a Button, and minde a matter ofmore importance: my Doublet will bee had againe for five and thirtyshillings, if the money may bee tendered downe at this very instant,whereas if we deferre it till to morrow, perhaps hee will then havethe whole eight and thirty which he lent me, and he doth me thispleasure, because I am ready (at another time) to affoord him the likecourtesie; why then should we loose three shillings, when they mayso easily be saved.

  • 霍华德-韦伯 08-03

    {  If gallant youth

  • 易迪 08-03

      Sometime there dwelt in Florence a young Gentleman, namedTheobaido Elisei, descended of a noble House, who became earnestlyenamoured of a Widdow, called Hermelina, the daughter toAldobrandino Palermini: well deserving, for his vertues andcommendable qualities, to enjoy of her whatsoever he could desire.Secretly they were espoused together, but Fortune, the enemy to Loversfelicities, opposed her malice against them, in depriving Theobaldo ofthose deere delights, which sometime he held in free possession, andmaking him as a stranger to her gracious favours. Now grew sheecontemptibly to despise him, not onely denying to heare any messagesent from him, but scorning also to vouch safe so much as a sight ofhim, causing in him extreme griefe and melancholy, yet concealling allher unkindnesse so wisely to himselfe, as no one could understandthe reason of his sadnesse.

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