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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:曹某均 大小:idGZZ18t15011KB 下载:UNueBJrl46988次
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日期:2020-08-06 15:09:37
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马芜

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Soliciting him still as shee was wont to doe, this promise passedfrom her to him, that when Ninetta was delivered out of prison, and insafetie at home in her house: hee should resort thither in some queintdisguise, and enjoy his long expected desire; but untill then shewould not yeeld. So violent was the Duke in the prosecution of hispurpose, that under colour of altering the manner of Ninettaesdeath, not suffering her to bee consumed by fire, but to be drowned,according to a custome observed there long time, and at theimportunity of her Sister Magdalena, in the still silence of thenight, Ninetta was conveyed into a sacke, and sent in that manner tothe House of Folco, the Duke following soone after, to challenge herpromise.
2.  THE SONG
3.  AND DISCREET ANSWERE, THEREBY PREVENTING LOSSE, DANGER, SCORNE
4.  Calandrino well noting, that Maso delivered all these speeches, witha stedfast countenance, no signe of smyling, or any gesture to urgethe least mislike: he gave such credit to them, as to any matter ofapparent and manifest truth, and upon this assured confidence, hesaid.
5.  And be betrayed, where you repose best trust.
6.  In the dead and silent time of night, when all (but Lovers) taketheir rest; Ricciardo having provided a Ladder of Ropes, with graplinghookes to take hold above and below, according as he had occasion touse it. By helpe thereof, first he mounted over the Garden wall, andthen climbde up to the Gallery window, before which (as is every wherein Italie) was a little round engirting Tarras, onely for a man tostand upon, for making cleane the window, or otherwise repairing it.Many nights (in this manner) enjoyed they their meetings,entermixing their amorous conference with infinite kisses and kindeembraces, as the window gave leave, he sitting in the Tarras, anddeparting alwayes before breake of day, for feare of beingdiscovered by any.

计划指导

1.  Nor was he negligent in the observation of her amorous regards,but the Tinder tooke, and his soule flamed with the selfe same fire;making him as desirous of her loving acceptance, as possibly she couldbe of his: so that the commanding power of love, could not easily bedistinguished in which of them it had the greater predominance. Forevery day as he brought her fresh supply of woolles, and found herseriously busied at her wheele: her soule would vent forth manydeepe sighes, and those sighes fetch floods of teares from her eyes,thorough the singular good opinion she had conceyved of him, andearnest desire to enjoy him. Pasquino on the other side, as leysuregave him leave for the least conversing with her: his disease wasevery way answerable to hers, for teares stood in his eyes, sighesflew abroad, to ease the poore hearts afflicting oppressions, whichthough he was unable to conceale; yet would he seeme to clowd themcleanly, by entreating her that his Masters worke might be neatlyperformed, and with such speed as time would permit her, intermixinginfinite praises of her artificiall spinning; and affirming withall,that the Quilles of Yearne received from her, were the choisest beautyof the whole peece; so that when other workewomen played, Simonida wassure to want no employment.
2.  THE THIRD DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
3.  Jeronimo affecting a yong Maiden, named Silvestra, was constrained(by the earnest importunity of his Mother) to take a journey to Paris.At his return home from thence againe, he found his love Silvestramarried. By secret meanes, he got entrance into her house, and dyedupon the bed lying by her. Afterward, his body being carried toChurch, to receive buriall, she likewise died there instantly upon hiscoarse.
4.  The courteous demeanor of Madam Aemilia, and the quaintnesse ofher discourse, caused both the Queene, and the rest of the company, tocommend the invention of carrying the Crosse, and the goldenoyntment appointed for pennance. Afterward, Philostratus, who was inorder to speake next, began in this manner.
5.  These newes were very strange to them, and their imprisonment asunwelcome; and although they were truly inocent, either in knowledgeof the horrid fact, or the departure of Folco with Ninetta: yetbeing unable to endure the tortures extremity, they made themselvesculpable by confession, and that they had a hand with Folco in themurder of Magdalena. Upon this their forced confession, and sentenceof death pronounced on them by the Duke himselfe; before the dayappointed for their publike execution, by great summes of money, whichthey had closely hid in their House, to serve when any urgentextremitie should happen to them; they corrupted their keepers, andbefore any intelligence could be had of their flight, they escapedby Sea to Rhodes, where they lived afterward in great distresse andmisery. The just vengeance of Heaven followed after Folco and Ninetta,he for murthering his honest wife, and she for poysoning her offendingHusband: for being beaten a long while on the Seas, by tempestuousstormes and weather, and not admitted landing in any Port or creeke;they were driven backe on the Coast of Candie againe, where beingapprehended, and brought to the City before the Duke, they confessedtheir several notorious offences, and ended their loathed lives in onefire together.
6.  A beautifull young Virgine, named Andreana, became enamoured of ayoung Gentleman called Gabriello. In conference together, she declareda dreame of hers to him, and he another of his to her; whereuponGabriello fell downe sodainly dead in her armes. She, and herChamber-maide were apprehended, by the Officers belonging to theSeigneury, as they were carrying Gabriello, to lay him before his ownedoore. The Potestate offering violence to the Virgin, and sheresisting him vertuously: it came to the understanding of herFather, who approved the innocence of his daughter, and compassedher deliverance. But she afterward, being weary of all worldlyfelicities, entred into Religion, and became a Nun.

推荐功能

1.  THEN FALL OF SCANDALL AND SLANDER
2.  Tofano (but in very uncivill maner) told her being abroad thatnight, and how she had used him: But the Neighbours seeing her to bewithin the house, and beleeving her, rather then him, in regard of histoo well knowne ill qualities; very sharpely reproved him, gave himgrosse speeches, pittying that any honest Woman should be socontinually abused. Now my good Neighbours (quoth she) you see whatmanner of man he is. What would you thinke of me, if I should walk thestreets thus in the night time, or be so late out of mine ownehouse, as this dayly Drunkard is? I was affraid least you would havegiven credit to his dissembling speeches, when he told you, that I wasat the Welles side, and threw something into the Well: but that I knowyour better opinion of me, and how sildome I am to be seene out ofdoores, although he would induce your sharper judgement of me, and laythat shame upon me, wherein he hath sinned himselfe.
3.  No sooner did bright day appeare, but Theobaldo arose, havingacquainted her with such matters as were to be done, and once moreearnestly desiring her, to conceale (as yet) these occurrences toher selfe. So in his Pilgrims habit, he departed from her house, toawaite convenient: opportunity, for attending on the businessebelonging to Aldobrandino. At the usuall houre appointed, the Lordswere all set in the Signioria, and had received full information,concerning the offence imputed to Aldobrandino, setting him at libertyby publique consent, and sentencing the other malefactors withdeath, who (within a few dayes after) were beheaded in place themurther was committed. Thus Aldobrandino being released, to hisexceeding comfort, and no small joy of his daughter, kindred, andfriends, all knowing perfectly, that this had happened by the Pilgrimsmeanes, they conducted him home to Aldobrandinoes house, where theydesired him to continue so long as himselfe pleased, using him withmost honourable and gracious respect, bilt especially Hermelina, whoknew (better then the rest) on whom she bestowed her liberall favours,yet concealing all closely to her selfe. After two or three dayes wereover-past, in these complementall entercoursings of kindnesse,Theobaldo began to consider, that it was high time for reconciliation,to be solemnely past betweene his brethren and Aldobrandino. For, theywere not a little amazed at his strange deliverance, and went likewisecontinually armed, as standing in feare of Aldobrandino and hisfriends; which made him the more earnest, for accomplishment of thepromise formerly made unto him. Aldobrandino lovingly replied, that hewas ready to make good his word. Whereupon, the Pilgrime provided agoodly Banquet, whereat he pursued to have present Aldobrandino, hisDaughter, Kindred, and their wives. But first, himselfe went inperson, to invite them in peace to his banquet, using many pregnantand forcible reasons to them, such as are requisite in the likediscordant cases. In the end, they were so wise and prevailing withthem that they willingly condiscended, and thought it no disparagementunto them, for the recovery of Aldobrandinoes kindnesse againe, tocrave pardon for their great error committed. On the morrow following,about dinner time, the foure brethren of Theobaldo, attired in theirmourning garments, with their wives and frends came first to the houseof Aldobrandino, who purposely stayed for them; and having laiddowne their weapons on the ground, in the presence of all such asAldobrandino had invited as his witnesses, they offered themselvesto his mercy, and humbly required pardon of him, for the matterwherein they had offended him. Aldobrandino shedding teares, mostlovingly embraced them, and (to be briefe) pardoned whatsoeverinjuries he had received. After this, the sisters and wives, allclad in mourning, courteously submitted themselves, and weregraciously welcommed by Madame Hermelina, as also divers otherGentlewomen there present with her. Being all seated at the Tables,which were furnished with such rarities as could be wished for; althings else deserved their due commendation, but onely sad silence,occasioned by the fresh remembrance of sorow, appearing in the habitesof Theobaldoes friends and kindred, which the Pilgrim himselfe plainlyperceived, to be the onely disgrace to him and his feast. Wherefore,as before he had resolved, when time served to purge away thismelancholly, he arose from the Table, when some (as yet) had scarsebegun to eate, and thus spake.
4.  So sweet and pleasing seemed the Song to the King (who tooke nosmall delight, both to heare and behold the Damosels) even as if allthe Hirarchies of Angels were descended from the Heavens to singbefore him. No sooner was the Song ended, but (humbly on theirknees) they craved favour of the King for their departing. Now,although their departure was greatly grieving to him, yet (inoutward appearance) he seemed willing to grant it.
5.   ADDICTED TO CREDULITIE, AND WILL GIVE CREDIT TO EVERY
6.  For Facing, Filching, Filthinesse;

应用

1.  THE NINTH DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
2.  This lost kinde of life in him, was no meane burthen of greefeunto his Noble Father, and all hope being already spent, of any futurehappy recovery, he gave command (because he would not alwaies havesuch a sorrow in his sight) that he should live at a Farme of his ownein a Country Village, among his Peazants and Plough-Swaines. Which wasnot any way distastefull to Chynon, but well agreed with his ownenaturall disposition; for their rurall qualities, and grosse behaviourpleased him beyond the Cities civility. Chynon living thus at hisFathers Countrey Village, exercising nothing else but ruralldemeanour, such as then delighted him above all other: it chanced upona day about the houre of noone, as hee was walking over the fields,with a long staffe on his necke, which commonly he used to carry; heentred in to a small thicket, reputed the goodliest in all thosequarters, and by reason it was then the month of May, the Trees hadtheir leaves fairely shot forth.
3.  It fortuned, that Pedro having no certaine knowledge of the way, butfollowing a trackt guiding too farre on the left hand; rode quiteout of course, and came at last within sight of a small Castle, out ofwhich (before they were aware) yssued twelve Villaines, whomAngelina sooner espyed, then Pedro could do; which made her cry out tohim, saying: Helpe deere Love to save us, or else we shall beassayled. Pedro then turning his horse so expeditiously as he could,and giving him the spurres as need required; mainly he galloppedinto a neere adjoyning Forrest, more minding the following ofAngelina, then any direction of way, or them that endeavoured to beehis hindrance. So that by often winding and turning about, as thepassage appeared troublesome to him, when he thought him selfe freeand furthest from them, he was round engirt, and seized on by them.When they had made him to dismount from his horse, questioning himof whence and what he was, and he resolving them therein, they fellinto a secret consultation, saying thus among themselves. This manis a friend to our deadly enemies, how can wee then otherwisedispose of him, but dreame him of all he hath, and in despight ofthe Orsini (men in nature hatefull to us) hang him up heere on oneof these Trees?
4、  The same morning as the Boare was kilde, they all three wentthither, and Calandrino seeing them in the Priests companie: badthem all heartily welcome; and to acquaint them with his goodHusbandry, hee shewed them his house, and the Boare where it hung.They perceyving it to be faire and fat, knowing also, thatCalandrino intended to salt it for his owne store, Bruno saide untohim: Thou art an Asse Calandrino, sell thy Brawne, and let us makemerrie with the money: then let thy wife know no otherwise, but thatit was stolne from thee, by those theeves which continually hauntcountry houses, especially in such scattering Villages.
5、  I make not any doubt, but almes-deedes and prayers, are very mighty;and prevailing meanes, to appease heavens anger for some sinnescommitted; but if such as bestow them, did either see or know, to whomthey give them: they would more warily keepe them, or else cast thembefore Swine, in regard they are altogether so unworthy of them. Butcome we now to the case of your ghostly father, crying out in youreare, that secret mariage was a most greevous sinne: Is not the breachthereof farre greater? Familiar conversation betweene man and manand woman, is a concession meerely naturall: but to rob, kill, orbanish any one, proceedeth from the mindes malignity. That thou didrob Theobaldo, your selfe hath already sufficiently witnessed, bytaking that from him, which with free consent in mariage you gave him.Next I must say, that by all the power remaining in you, you kild him,because you would not permit him to remaine with you, declaring yourselfe in the very height of cruelty, that hee might destroy his lifeby his owne hands. In which case the Law requireth, that whosoeveris the occasion of an ill act committed, hee or she is as deepe in thefault, as the party that did it. Now concerning his banishment, andwandring seaven yeeres in exile thorow the world; you cannot denie,but that you were the onely occasion thereof. In all which threeseverall actions, farre more capitally have you offended; then bycontracting of mariage in such clandestine manner.

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网友评论(uUSpcFkE99502))

  • 徐乐萍 08-05

      A Sister of this house once told me, that before her turne came tobe sent to the Soldane, she fell in frailty with a man that was bothlame and blinde, and discovering the same to her Ghostly Father inconfession; he absolved her of that sinne; affirming, that she had nottransgressed with a man, because he wanted his rationall andunderstanding parts. Behold Sister, heere lyes a creature, almostformed in the self-same mold, dumbe and deafe, which are two themost rationall and understanding parts that do belong to any man,and therefore no Man, wanting them. If folly and frailty would becommitted with him (as many times since hee came hither it hath run inmy minde) hee is by Nature, sworne to such secrecie, that he cannot(if he would) be a blabbe thereof. Beside, the Lawes andconstitution of our Religion doth teach us, that a sinne soassuredly concealed, is more then halfe absolved.

  • 阿尔迪 08-05

      Adriano (on the other side) perceiving how wisely the womanexcused her owne shame and her daughters; to backe her in abusinesse so cunningly begun, he called to Panuccio, saying. Havenot I tolde thee an hundred times, that thou art not fit to lye anywhere, out of thine owne lodging? What a shame is this baseimperfection to thee, by rising and walking thus in the night-time,according as thy dreames doe wantonly delude thee, and cause thee toforsake thy bed, telling nothing but lies and fables, yet avouchingthem for manifest truthes? Assuredly this will procure no meane perillunto thee: Come hither, and keepe in thine owne bedde for meere shame.

  • 蔡建辉 08-05

       The sweets of minde

  • 沈桥 08-05

      Or in my death listen my Swan-like Dittie.

  • 吴心韬 08-04

    {  Philostratus, gladly I do accept your gift; and to the end that yemay the better remember your selfe, concerning what you have donehitherto: I will and command, that generall preparation be madeagainst to morrow, for faire and happy fortunes hapning to Lovers,after former cruell and unkinde accidents. Which proposition wasvery pleasing to them all.

  • 苏浙 08-03

      IN SOME EVIDENT DANGER}

  • 唐津高速 08-03

      The answer of Lisana pleased the Queene exceedingly, in findingher to be so wise and faire, as the King himself had before informedher: who instantly called for her Father and Mother, and knowingthey would be well pleased with whatsoever he did; he called for aproper yong Gentleman, but somewhat poore, being named Perdicano,and putting certaine Rings into his hand, which he refused not toreceive, caused him there to espouse Lisana. To whome the King gaveimmediately (besides Chaines and jewels of inestimable valew,delivered by the Queene to the Bride) Ceffala and Calatabelotta, twogreat territories abounding in divers wealthy possessions, saying toPerdicano. These wee give thee, as a dowry in marriage with thisbeautifull Maid, and greater gifts we will bestow on thee hereafter,as we shal perceive thy love and kindnesse to her.

  • 蒋皓 08-03

      The same morning as the Boare was kilde, they all three wentthither, and Calandrino seeing them in the Priests companie: badthem all heartily welcome; and to acquaint them with his goodHusbandry, hee shewed them his house, and the Boare where it hung.They perceyving it to be faire and fat, knowing also, thatCalandrino intended to salt it for his owne store, Bruno saide untohim: Thou art an Asse Calandrino, sell thy Brawne, and let us makemerrie with the money: then let thy wife know no otherwise, but thatit was stolne from thee, by those theeves which continually hauntcountry houses, especially in such scattering Villages.

  • 俞心樵 08-02

       OF ANOTHER, WHEN HEE COMPASSETH CRAFT TO DEFEND HIMSELFE

  • 方志坚 07-31

    {  Now, for their securer meeting, to stand cleare from all matter ofscandal or detection, they concluded in this order between themselves.Lazaro, for so was Peronellaes Husband named, being an earely riserevery morning, either to seeke for worke, or to effect it beingundertaken: this amorous friend being therewith acquainted, andstanding in some such convenient place, where hee could see Lazaroesdeparture from his house, and yet himselfe no way discerned; pooreLazaro was no sooner gone, but presently he enters the house, whichstood in a verie solitarie street, called the Avorio. Many morningshad they thus met together, to their no meane delight andcontentation, till one especial morning among the rest, when Lazarowas gone forth to worke, and Striguario (so was the amorous youngman named) visiting Peronella in the house: upon a verie urgentoccasion, Lazaro returned backe againe, quite contrary to his formerwont, keeping foorth all day, and never comming home till night.

  • 冯国健 07-31

      Thou tookst advantage:

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