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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:基努·里维斯 大小:nuPIQhCW86382KB 下载:B9WucX5G49769次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:SZZIcBvD47381条
日期:2020-08-05 12:58:31
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  He happening (on a day) to meete him in the Church of Saint John,and seeing him seriously busied, in beholding the rare pictures, andthe curious carved Tabernacle, which (not long before) was placed onthe. high Altar in the said Church: considered with himselfe, thathe had now fit place and opportunity, to effect what hee had long timedesired. And having imparted his minde to a very intimate friend,how he intended to deale with simple Calandrino: they went both veryneere him, where he sate all alone, and making shew as if they saw himnot; began to consult between themselves, concerning the rareproperties of precious stones; whereof Maso discoursed as exactly,as he had beene a most skilfull Lapidarie; to which conference oftheirs, Calandrino lent an attentive eare, in regard it was matterof singular rarity.
2.  Tancrede, to denie what I have done, or to entreate any favourfrom you, is now no part of my disposition: for as the one canlittle availe me, so shall not the other any way advantage me.Moreover, I covet not that you should extend any clemency or kindnesseto me, but by my voluntary confession of the truth do intend (first ofall) to defend mine honour, with reasons sound, good, andsubstantiall, and then vertuously pursue to full effect, thegreatnesse of my minde and constant resolution. True it is, that Ihave loved, and still do, honourable Guiscardo, purposing the likeso long as I shall live, which will be but a small while: but if it bepossible to continue the same affection after death, it is for evervowed to him onely. Nor did mine owne womanish weaknesse so muchthereto induce me, as the matchlesse vertues shining clearly inGuiscardo, and the little respect you had of marrying me againe. Whyroyall Father, you cannot be ignorant, that you being composed offlesh and blood, have begotten a Daughter of the selfe samecomposition, and not made of stone or iron. Moreover, you ought toremember (although now you are farre stept in yeeres) what the Lawesof youth are, and with what difficulty they are to be contradicted.Considering withall, that albeit (during the vigour of your best time)you evermore were exercised in Armes; yet you should likewiseunderstand, that negligence and idle delights, have mighty power,not onely in young people, but also in them of greatest yeares.
3.  Upon the hearing of this noise, her Mistris came sodainely intothe Chamber, where being affrighted at so strange an accident, andsuspecting that Ruggiero was dead indeed: she pinched him strongly,and burnt his finger with a candle, yet all was as fruitelesse asbefore. Then sitting downe, she began to consider advisedly with herselfe, how much her honour and reputation would be endangeredhereby, both with her Husband, and in vulgar opinion when thisshould come to publike notice. For (quoth she to her Maide) it isnot thy fond love to this unruly fellow that can sway the censure ofthe monster multitude, in beleeving his accesse hither onely tothee: but my good name, and honest repute, as yet untoucht with thevery least taxation, will be rackt on the tenter of infamousjudgement, and (though never so cleare) branded with generallcondemnation. It is wisedome therefore, that we should make no noisebut (in silence) consider with our selves, how to cleare the houseof this dead body, by some such helpfull and witty device, as whenit shall be found in the morning, his being here may passe withoutsuspition, and the worlds rash opinion no way touch US.
4.  The Gentleman being a little wiser then his ghostly Father,perceived immediately, the notable pollicy of the Woman. Whereupon,making somewhat bashfull appearance of any error already committed, hesaid; He would afterward be better advised. So departing from theFriar, hee went on directly, to passe by the house where theGentlewoman dwelt, and shee stood alwayes ready on her watch, at alittle Window, to observe when he would walke that way. And seeing himcomming, shee shewed her selfe so joyfull and gracious to him, as heeasily understood, whereto the substance of the holy Fathers chidingtended. And from that time forward, he used dayly though in covertmanner (to the no litle liking of the Gentlewoman and himselfe) tomake his passage thorough that street, under colour of someimportant occasions there concerning him.
5.  APPROVING, THAT NO PROMISE IS TO BE KEPT WITH SUCH WOMEN AS WILL
6.  THE FIRST DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL

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1.  Now trust me Sir, answered Melisso, I am a native of Laiazzo, and asyou are vexed with one great mis-fortune, even so am I offended withanother. I am young, wealthy, well derived by birth, and allowliberall expences, for maintaining a worthy table in my house, withoutdistinguishing persons by their rancke and quality, but make it freefor all commers, both of the city, and all places els. Notwithstandingall which bounty and honourable entertainement, I cannot meet with anyman that loveth me. In which respect, I journey to the same place asyou doe, to crave the counsell of so wise a King, what I should doe,whereby I might procure men to love me. Thus like two well-metfriendly companions, they rode on together, untill they arrived inGreat Britaine, where, by meanes of the Noble Barons attending onthe King, they were brought before him. Melisso delivered his minde invery few words, whereto the King made no other answere, but this:Learne to love. Which was no sooner spoken, but Melisso wasdismissed from the Kings presence.
2.  SUCCESSEFULL IN THEIR LOVE, AFTER MANY HARD AND
3.  What a beast am I? What a businesse have I undertaken? And whitheram I going? What do I know, but that the Kinsman unto this Woman,perhappes understanding mine affection to her, and crediting some suchmatter, as is nothing so: hath laide this politicke traine for me,that he may murther me in the grave? Which (if it should so happen) mylife is lost, and yet the occasion never knowne whereby it was done.Or what know I, whether some secret enemy of mine (affecting her inlike manner, as I do) have devised this stratagem (out of malice)against mee, to draw my life in danger, and further his owne goodFortune? Then, contrary motions, overswaying these suspitions, hequestioned his thoughts in another nature.
4.  Many other speeches past betweene them in a short while, but inthe end, Chichibio, because hee would not have his MistresseBrunetta angrie with him; cut away one of the Cranes legges from thespit, and gave it to her to eate. Afterward, when the Fowle was servedup to the Table before Messer Currado, who had invited certainstrangers his friends to sup with him, wondering not a little, hecalled for Chichibio his Cook; demanding what was become of the Cranesother legge? Whereto the Venetian (being a lyar by Nature) sodainelyanswered: Sir, Cranes have no more but one legge each Bird. MesserCurrado, growing verie angry, replyed. Wilt thou tell me, that a Cranehath no more but one legge? Did I never see a Crane before this?Chichibio persisting resolutely in his deniall, saide. Beleeve me Sir,I have told you nothing but the truth, and when you please, I wil makegood my wordes, by such Fowles as are living.
5.  Chynon being now wounded to the heart (where never any civillinstruction could before get entrance) with loves piercing dart, bythe bright beauty of Iphigenia, mooved much admiration (falling fromone change to another) in his Father, Kindred, and all else thatknew him. For first, he requested of his Father, that he might behabited and respected like to his other Brethren, whereto right gladlyhe condiscended. And frequenting the company of civill youths,observing also the cariage of Gentlemen, especially such as wereamorously enclined: he grew to a beginning in short time (to thewonder of every one) not onely to understand the first instructionof letters, but also became most skilfull, even amongst them that werebest exercised in Philosophy. And afterward, love to Iphigenia beingthe sole occasion of this happy alteration, not onely did his harshand clownish voyce convert it selfe more mildely, but also heebecame a singular Musitian, and could perfectly play on anyinstrument. Beside, he tooke delight in the riding and managing ofgreat horses, and finding himselfe of a strong and able body, heexercised all kinds of Military Disciplines, as well by Sea, as on theland. And, to be breefe, because I would not seeme tedious in therepetition of all his vertues, scarsly had he attained to the fourthyeare, after he was thus falne in love, but hee became generallyknowne, to be the most civil, wise, and worthy Gentleman, aswell forall vertues enriching the minde, as any whatsoever to beautifie thebody, that very hardly he could be equalled throughout the wholekingdome of Cyprus.What shall we say then (vertuous Ladies) concerning this Chynon?Surely nothing else, but that those high and divine vertues, infusedinto his gentle soule, were by envious Fortune bound and shut up insome small angle of his intellect, which being shaken and set atliberty by love, (as having a farre more potent power then Fortune, inquickning and reviving the dull drowsie spirits) declared his mightyand soveraigne Authority, in setting free so many faire and preciousvertues unjustly detayned, to let the worlds eye behold them truly, bymanifest testimony from whence he can deliver those spiritssubjected to his power, and guid them (afterward) to the highestdegrees of honour. And although Chynon by affecting Iphigenia,failed in some particular things; yet notwithstanding, his FatherAristippus duely considering, that love had made him a man, whereas(before) he was no better then a beast: not onely endured allpatiently, but also advised him therein, to take such courses asbest liked himselfe. Neverthelesse, Chynon (who refused to be calledGalesus, which was his naturall name indeed) remembring that Iphigeniatearmed him Chynon, and coveting (under this title) to accomplishthe issue of his honest amorous desire: made many motions toCiphaeus the Father of Iphigenia, that he would be pleased to lethim enjoy her in marriage. But Ciphaeus told him, that he hadalready passed his promise for her, to a Gentleman of Rhodes, namedPasimondo, which promise he religiously intended to performe.
6.  For live with him I may not, nor aspire,

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1.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE SIXTH NOVELL
2.  Now Bruno plainly perceiving (within a short while of this new begunacquaintance) that the Physitian was a Loggerhead, and meerely nobetter then a Gregorian Animall: he beganne to have much goodpastime with him, by telling him strange and incredible Tales, such asnone but a Coxcombe would give credit too; yet they delighted DoctorDunce extraordinarily, and Brunoes familiarity was so highlypleasing to him, that he was a daily guest at dinner and supper withhim, and hee was not meanly proud of enjoying his company. One day, asthey sate in familiar conference together, he told Bruno that hewondred not a little at him and Buffalmaco, they being both so poorepeople, yet lived far more jovially then Lords, and thereforedesired to understand, by what secret meanes they compassed suchmirthful maintenance. Bruno, hearing the Doctors demaund, andperceiving that it savoured more of the foole, then any the very leasttaste of wisedome: smiled unto himselfe, and determined to returne himsuch an answere, as might be fitting for his folly, whereupon, thus hereplied.
3.  Now concerning the skilfull Magitian, to whom Ansaldo meant togive the bountifull recompence agreed on betweene them, hee havingseene the strange liberality, which the husband expressed to SigniorAnsaldo, and that of Ansaldo to the Lady, hee presently saide. Greatjupiter strike me dead with thunder, having my selfe seene a husbandso liberall of his honour, and you Sir of true noble kindnesse, if Ishould not be the like of my recompence: for, perceiving it to be soworthily imployed, I am well contented that you shal keepe it. TheNoble Lord was modestly ashamed, and strove (so much as in him lay)that he should take all, or the greater part thereof: but seeing helaboured meerly in vaine, after the third day was past, and theMagitian had destroyed the Garden againe, hee gave him free liberty todepart, quite controlling all fond and unchaste affection in himselfe,either towards Dianora, or any Lady else, and living (ever after) asbest becommeth any Nobleman to do.
4.  No true love was worse spent,
5.   Seating her selfe by him, as if shee had some weighty matter to tellhim; she proceeded in this manner. Alas my Lord, you shall not need toquestion them, because I can sufficiently resolve you therein: which(neverthelesse) I have long concealed, because I would not beoffensive to you. But in regard, it is now manifestly apparant, thatothers have tasted, what (I immagined) none but my selfe did, I willno longer hide it from you. Assuredly Sir, there is a most strange andunwonted ill-savour, continually issuing from your mouth, smellingmost noysomely, and I wonder what should be the occasion. In formertimes, I never felt any such foule breathing to come from you: andyou, who do dally converse with so many worthy persons, should seekemeanes to be rid of so great an annoyance. You say verie true wife(answered Nicostratus) and I protest to you on my Credite, I feeleno such ill smell, neither know what should cause it, except I havesom corrupted tooth in my mouth. Perhaps Sir (quoth she) it may be so,and yet you feele not the savour which others do, yea, veryoffensively.
6.  The fight (as you have formerly heard) continuing betweene Robertoand Arriguccio, the neighbours hearing of the clashing of their Swordsin the streets; arose out of their beds, and reproved them in veryharsh manner. In which respect Arriguccio, fearing to be knowne, andignorant also what his adversary was (no harme being as yet done oneither side) permitted him to depart; and extreamely full of anger,returned backe againe to his house. Being come up into hisbed-chamber, thus he began; Where is this lewde and wicked woman?what? hast thou put out the light, because I should not finde thee?that shall not avayle thee, for I can well enough finde a drab inthe darke. So, groping on to the beds side, and thinking hee had takenholde on his wife, he grasped the Chamber-maide, so beating her withhis fists, and spurning her with his feet, that al her face was bloodyand bruised. Next, with his knife he cut off a great deal of herhaire, giving her the most villanous speeches as could be devised:swearing, that he would make her a shame to all the world.

应用

1.  A Sister of this house once told me, that before her turne came tobe sent to the Soldane, she fell in frailty with a man that was bothlame and blinde, and discovering the same to her Ghostly Father inconfession; he absolved her of that sinne; affirming, that she had nottransgressed with a man, because he wanted his rationall andunderstanding parts. Behold Sister, heere lyes a creature, almostformed in the self-same mold, dumbe and deafe, which are two themost rationall and understanding parts that do belong to any man,and therefore no Man, wanting them. If folly and frailty would becommitted with him (as many times since hee came hither it hath run inmy minde) hee is by Nature, sworne to such secrecie, that he cannot(if he would) be a blabbe thereof. Beside, the Lawes andconstitution of our Religion doth teach us, that a sinne soassuredly concealed, is more then halfe absolved.
2.  Truly (quoth Calandrino) well enough to mine owne thinking, yetnotwithstanding, I met with Nello but even now; and he told me, thatmy countenance was very much altred; Is it possible that I shouldbee sicke, and feele no paine or distaste in any part of me?Buffalmaco answered; I am not so skilfull in judgement, as to argue onthe Nature of distemper in the body: but sure I am, that thou hastsome daungerous inward impediment, because thou lookst (almost) like aman more then halfe dead.
3.  Upon a day, being alone by her selfe, and the time seemingsuteable to her intention: shee sent for the Count, under colour ofsome other important conference with him. The Count D'Aongiers,whose thoughts were quite contrary to hers: immediately went to her,where they both sitting downe together on a beds side in herChamber, according as formerly shee had plotted her purpose; twice heedemaunded of her, upon what occasion she had thus sent for him. Shesitting a long while silent, as if she had no answere to make him,pressed by the violence of her amorous passions, a Vermillion tinctureleaping up into her face, yet shame enforcing teares from her eyes,with words broken and halfe confused, at last she began to deliver herminde in this manner.
4、  THE EIGHT DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL
5、  Why should blacke cloudes obscure so bright a cleare?

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网友评论(UDjIUV8t62036))

  • 王宗萍 08-04

      Ancilla (for so she was named) dost thou not observe, how thisScholler is come to lose all the wit heere, which he studyed so longfor in the University of Paris? Let us make him our onely Tableargument, and seeing his folly soareth so high, we will feed himwith such a dyet as hee deserveth. Yet when thou speakest next withhim, tell him, that I affect him more then he can doe me; but itbecommeth me to be carefull of mine honour, and to walke with anuntainted brow, as other Ladies and Gentlewomen doe: which he is notto mislike, if he be so wise as he maketh shew of, but rather will themore commend me. Alas good Lady lack-wit, little did she understand(faire assembly) how dangerous a case it is [to] deale with Schollers.

  • 王耀华 08-04

      Reniero swelling with discontentment, yet wisely clouding it fromopen apprehension, and knowing well enough, that such goldenspeeches and promises, did alwaies savour of what intemperatespleene would more lavishly have vented foorth, and therefore in amodest dissembling manner; without the least shew of any anger, thushe answered.

  • 华勇兵 08-04

       Like mine poore amorous Maide.

  • 黄超 08-04

      mer two discoursers to part from: And there I will shew you, how aCitizen of ours, recovered the kindnesse of his Love, after hee hadlost it.

  • 近藤洋介 08-03

    {  The Abbot pretending great admiration at this accident, called hisMonkes about him, all labouring by rubbing his temples, throwingcold water and vinegar in his face, to revive him againe; alleagingthat some fume or vapour in the stomacke, had thus over-awed hisunderstanding faculties, and quite deprived him of life indeede. Atlength, when by tasting the pulse, and all their best employed paines,they saw that their labour was spent in vaine; the Abbot used suchperswasions to the Monkes, that they all beleeved him to be dead:whereupon they sent for his wife and friends, who crediting as much asthe rest did, were very sad and sorrowfull for him.

  • 阿莱格里 08-02

      THEIR UNLAWFULL DESIRES}

  • 邢有礼 08-02

      During these passed accidents, the Pope had received intelligence ofthe Lord Abbots surprizall, which was not a little displeasing to him:but when he saw him returned, he demaunded, what benefit he receivedat the Bathes? Whereto the Abbot, merrily smyling, thus replyed.Holy Father, I met with a most skilfull Physitian neerer hand, whoseexperience is beyond the power of the Bathes, for by him I am veryperfectly cured: and so discoursed all at large. The Pope laughingheartely, and the Abbot continuing on still his report; moved withan high and magnificent courage, he demaunded one gracious favour ofthe Pope: who imagining that he would request a matter of greatermoment, then he did, freely offered to grant, whatsoever he desired.

  • 杨林太 08-02

      In this honourable order (observed as his estated custom) hepersevered so long a while, as not onely the East parts, but alsothose in the west, were every where acquainted with his fame andrenown. Being already well stept into yeares, but yet not wearie(therefore) of his great charge and liberality: it fortuned, thatthe rumor of his noble Hospitality, came to the eare of anothergallant Gentleman, named Mithridanes, living in a Countrey not farreoff from the other.

  • 安宝山 08-01

       Somtime (faire Ladies) there lived in Arimino, a Merchant, very richin wealth and worldly possessions, who having a beautifull Gentlewomanto his wife, he became extreamly jelous of her. And he had no otherreason for this foolish conceit; but, like as he loved hir dearly, andfound her to be very absolutely faire: even so he imagined, thatalthogh she devised by her best meanes to give him content; yet otherswould grow enamored of her, because she appeared so amiable to al.In which respect, time might tutor her to affect some other besidehimselfe: the onely common argument of every bad minded man, beingweake and shallow in his owne understanding. This jelous humorincreasing in him more and more, he kept her in such narrow restraint:that many persons condemned to death, have enoyed larger libertie intheir imprisonment. For, she might not bee present at Feasts,Weddings, nor goe to Church, or so much as to be seen at her doore:Nay, she durst not stand in her Window, nor looke out of her house,for any occasion whatsoever. By means whereof, life seemed mosttedious and offensive to her, and she supported it the moreimpatiently, because shee knew her selfe not any way faulty.

  • 高宗武 07-30

    {  Thou knowest (my most true and faithfull servant) what trouble andaffliction of minde I suffer dayly, by the messages and Letters of thetwo Florentines, Rinuccio and Alessandro, how hatefull theirimportunity is to me, as being utterly unwilling to hear themspeake, or yeeld to any thing which they desire. Wherefore, to free myselfe from them both together, I have devised (in regard of theirgreat and liberall offers) to make trial of them in such a matter,as I am assured they will never performe.

  • 严俊昌 07-30

      Abraham a Jew, being admonished or advised by a friend of his,named Jehannot de Chevigny, travailed from Paris unto Rome: Andbeholding there the wicked behaviour of men in the Church, returnedbacke to Paris againe, where yet (neverthelesse) he became aChristian.

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