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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:夏立丽 大小:FyrQk8N458201KB 下载:F6ZB36H188001次
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日期:2020-08-08 18:40:07
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吴思

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  It chanced upon a day, that Signior Guido departing from theChurch of Saint Michaell d'Horta, and passing along by the Adamari, sofarre as to Saint Johns Church, which evermore was his customarieWalke: many goodly Marble Tombes were then about the saide Church,as now adayes are at Saint Reparata, and divers more beside. Heentring among the Collumbes of Porphiry, and the other Sepulchersbeing there, because the doore of the Church was shut: Signior Bettoand his companie, came riding from S. Reparata, and espying SigniorGuldo among the graves and tombes, said. Come, let us go make somejests to anger him. So putting the spurs to their horses, they rodeapace towards him: and being upon him before he perceived them, one ofthem said. Guido thou refusest to be one of our society, and seekestfor that which never was: when thou hast found it, tell us, whatwilt thou do with it?
2.  The Lady having a good appetite indeede, when she had first tastedit, fed afterward so heartily thereon, that she left very little, ornone at all remaining. When he perceived that all was eaten, he saidunto her: Tell me Madame, how you do like this delicate kinde ofmeate? In good faith Sir (quoth she) in all my life I was never betterpleased. Now trust mee Madame, answered the Knight, I do verilybeleeve you, nor do I greatly wonder thereat, if you like that dead,which you loved so dearly being alive. When she heard these words, along while she sate silert, but afterward saide. I pray you tell meSir; what meate was this which you have made me to eate? Muse nolonger (saide he) for therein I will quickly resolve thee. Thou hasteaten the heart of Messer Guiglielmo Guardastagno, whose love was sodeare and precious to thee, thou false, perfidious, and disloyallLady: I pluckt it out of his vile body with mine owne hands, andmade my Cooke to dresse it for thy diet.
3.  My spirits reassume your former strength,
4.  Madam, by such revelations as have beene shewne to me, I know fora certainety, that Theobaldo is not dead, but living, in health, andin good estate; if he had the fruition of your grace and favour.Take heede what you say Sir (quoth the Gentlewoman) for I saw himlye slain before my doore, his bodie having received many wounds,which I folded in mine armes, and washed his face with my brinishteares; whereby (perhaps) the scandall arose, that flew abroad to mydisgrace. Beleeve me Madam, replyed the Pilgrim, say what you will,I dare assure you that Theobaldo is living, and if you dare makepromise, concerning what hath bin formerly requested, and keepe itinviolably, I make no doubt, but you your selfe shall shortly see him.I promise it (quoth she) and binde my selfe thereto by a sacredoath, to keepe it faithfully: for never could any thing happen toyeeld me the like contentment, as to see my Father free from danger,and Theobaldo living.
5.  The good old Lady imagined, that this was a matter somewhatdifficult, and might lay a blamefull imputation on her daughter.Neverthelesse, considering, what an honest office it was in her, tobee the meanes, whereby so worthy a Countesse should recover anunkinde husband, led altogether by lust, and not a jot of cordialllove; she knew the intent to be honest, the Countesse vertuous, andher promise religious, and therefore undertooke to effect it. Withinfew dayes after, verie ingeniously, and according to the instructedorder, the Ring was obtayned, albeit much against the Counts will; andthe Countesse, in sted of the Ladies vertuous daughter, was embracedby him in bed: the houre proving so auspicious, and juno being Lady ofthe ascendent, conjoyned with the witty Mercury, shee conceived of twogoodly Sonnes, and her deliverance agreed correspondently with thejust time.Thus the old Lady, not at this time onely, but at many other meetingsbesides; gave the Countesse free possession of her husbands pleasures,yet alwayes in such darke and concealed secrecie, as it was neversuspected, nor knowne by any but themselves, the Count lying withhis owne wife, and disappointed of her whom he more deerely loved.Alwayes at his uprising in the mornings (which usually was beforethe break of day, for preventing the least scruple of suspicion)many familiar conferences passed betweene them, with the gifts ofdivers faire: and costly jewels; all which the Countesse carefullykept, and perceiving assuredly, that shee was conceived with childe,shee would no longer bee troublesome to the good old Lady; but callingher aside, spake thus to her. Madame, I must needes give thankes toheaven and you, because my desires are amply accomplished, and bothtime and your deserts doe justly challenge, that I shouldaccordingly quite you before my departure. It remaineth now in yourowne power, to make what demand you please of me, which yet I will notgive you by way of reward, because that would seeme to bee base andmercenary: but onely whatsoever you shall receive of me, is inhonourable recompence of faire and vertuous deservings, such as anyhonest and well-minded Lady in the like distresse, may with goodcredit allow, and yet no prejudice to her reputation.
6.  But above all the rest, Nicoluccio Caccianimico could never besatisfied with beholding her; and, enflamed with earnest desire, toknow what she was, could not refraine (seeing the Knight was goneout of the roome) but demaunded of her, whether she were of Bologna,or a stranger? when the Lady heard her selfe to be thus questioned,and by her Husband, it seemed painefull to her, to containe fromanswering: Neverthelesse, to perfect the Knights intended purpose, shesate silent. Others demaunded of her, whether the sweet Boy were hers,or no; and some questioned, if she were Gentiles Wife, or no, orelse his Kinsewoman; to all which demaunds, she returned not anyanswere. But when the Knight came to them againe, some of them said tohim. Sir, this woman is a goodly creature, but she appeareth to bedumbe, which were great pitty, if it should be so. Gentlemen (quothhe) it is no small argument of her vertue, to sit still and silentat this instant. Tell us then (said they) of whence, and what sheis. Therein (quoth he) I will quickely resolve you, upon yourconditionall promise: that none of you do remove from his place,whatsoever shall be said or done, untill I have fully delivered myminde. Every one bound himselfe by solemne promise, to perform what hehad appointed, and the Tables being voided, as also the Carpetslaid; then the Knight (sitting downe by the Lady) thus began.

计划指导

1.  Pamphilus hath declared to us, by his Tale, how the goodnesse of Godregardeth not our errors, when they proceede from things which weecannot discerne. And I intend to approove by mine, what argument ofinfallible truth, the same benignity delivereth of it selfe, byenduring patiently the faults of them, that (both in word and worke)should declare unfaigned testimony of such gracious goodnesse, and notto live so dissolutely as they doe. To the end, that othersillumined by their light of life, may beleeve with the strongerconstancy of minde.
2.  Truly (quoth Calandrino) well enough to mine owne thinking, yetnotwithstanding, I met with Nello but even now; and he told me, thatmy countenance was very much altred; Is it possible that I shouldbee sicke, and feele no paine or distaste in any part of me?Buffalmaco answered; I am not so skilfull in judgement, as to argue onthe Nature of distemper in the body: but sure I am, that thou hastsome daungerous inward impediment, because thou lookst (almost) like aman more then halfe dead.
3.  The Pope, who was of a magnanimious spirit, and one that highlyaffected men of vertue, hearing the commendable motion made by theAbbot; returned answere, that he was as willing to grant it, as theother desired it, sending Letters of safe conduct for his commingthither. Ghinotto receiving such assurance from the Court of Rome,came thither immediatly, to the great joy of the Lord Abbot: and thePope finding him to be a man of valor and worth, uponreconciliation, remitted all former errors, creating him knight, andLord Prior of the very chiefest Hospitall in Rome. In which Officehe lived long time after, as a loyall servant to the Church, and anhonest thankefull friend to the Lord Abbot of Clugny.
4.  Geloso, more than halfe mad with anger, first, because hee hadlost his supper: next, having sitten almost all the night (which wasextreamely cold and windle) his Armor much mollesting him, and yethe could see no Friar come: when day drew neere, and hee ashamed towatch there any longer; conveighed himselfe to some more convenientplace, where putting off his Armes, and seeming to come from the placeof his Lodging; about the ninth houre, he found his doore open, entredin, and went up the stayres, going to dinner with his Wife. Within awhile after, according as Geloso had ordred the businesse, a youthcame thither, seeming to be the Novice sent from the Confessor, and hebeing admitted to speake with her, demanded, whether shee weretroubled or mollested that night passed, as formerly she had bin,and whether the partie came or no? The Woman, who knew well enough theMessenger (notwithstanding all his formall disguise) made answer: Thatthe party expected, came not: but if hee had come, it was to nopurpose; because her minde was now otherwise altred, albeit shechanged not a jote from her amorous conclusion.
5.  After she had an indifferent while considered with her selfe, herresolution became so indauntable; that she would adventure to practisesuch meanes, whereby to compasse those two apparant impossibilities,and so to enjoy the love of her husband. Having absolutely concludedwhat was to be done, she assembled all the cheefest men of thecountry, revealing unto them (in mournfull manner) what an attempt shehad made already, in hope of recovering her husbands favour, andwhat a rude answer was thereon returned. In the end, she told them,that it did not sute with her unworthinesse, to make the Count live asan exile from his owne inheritance, upon no other inducement, butonely in regard of her: wherefore, she had determined betweeneheaven and her soule, to spend the remainder of her dayes inPilgrimages and prayers, for preservation of the Counts soule andher owne; earnestly desiring them, to undertake the charge andgovernment of the Country, and signifying unto the Count, how shehad forsaken his house, and purposed to wander so farre thence, thatnever would she visit Roussillion any more. In the deliverie ofthese words, the Lords and Gentlemen wept and sighedextraordinarily, using many earnest imprecations to alter this resolvein her, but all was in vaine.
6.  The Chorus sung by all

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1.  The young Maiden, who was still dismayed by her owne Dreame,became much more afflicted in her minde, when shee had heard thisother reported by Gabriello: but yet to give him no occasion ofdistast, she bare it out in the best manner she could devise to doe.And albeit they spent the time in much pleasing discourse,maintained with infinite sweete kisses on either side: yet was shestill suspitious, but knew not whereof; fixing her eyes oftentimesupon his face, and throwing strange lookes to all parts of the Garden,to catch hold on any such blacke ugly sight, whereof he had formerlymade description to her. As thus she continued in these afflictingfeares, it fortuned, that Gabriello sodainly breathing forth a veryvehement sighe, and throwing his armes fast about her, said: O helpeme dear Love, or else I dye; and, in speaking the words, fell downeupon the ground. Which the yong Damosel perceiving, and drawing himinto her lappe, weeping saide: Alas sweete Friend, What paine doestthou feele?
2.  Love, I found such felicity, etc.
3.  But now mine error I do plainly see:
4.  Supposing there to finde a solemne peace:
5.   One day, when as yet Neerbale had not lain with her, some of herwomen asked how she had served God in the desert. She replied that shehad served Him by putting the Devil in Hell, and that Neerbale hadcommitted a grievous sin in taking her from such pious work. Then theyasked: "How is the Devil put in Hell?" To which the girl answered withwords and gestures showing how it had been done. The women laughedso heartily that they have not done laughing yet, and said to her:"Grieve not, my child; that is done as well here. Neerbale willserve God right well with thee in this way."
6.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL

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1.  Giosefo also relating, wherefore he came thither; the Kingreplying onely thus: Goe to the Goose Bridge: and presently Giosefohad also his dismission from the King. Comming forth, he found Melissoattending for him, and revealed in what manner the King had answeredhim: whereupon, they consulted together, concerning both theiransweres, which seemed either to exceed their comprehension, or elsewas delivered them in meere mockery, and therefore (more then halfediscontented) they returned homeward againe.
2.  The yong man, hearing these wordes, and remembring what lovingkindnesse he had formerly found, what secret love Letters he hadsent from Paris, with other private intelligences and tokens, whichnever came to her receite and knowledge, so cunningly his Mother andTutors had carried the matter: immediately felt his heart-strings tobreake, and lying downe upon the beds side by her, uttered these hisvery last words. Silvestra farewell, thou hast kilde the kindest heartthat ever loved a woman: and speaking no more, gave up the ghost.She hearing these words delivered with an entire sighe, anddeepe-fetcht groane, did not imagine the strange consequence followingthereon; yet was mooved to much compassion, in regard of her formeraffection to him. Silent she lay an indifferent while, as being unableto returne him any answer, and looking when he would be gone,according as before she had earnestly entreated him. But when sheperceyved him to lye so still, as neither word or motion came fromhim, she saide: Kinde Jeronimo, why doest thou not depart and get theegone? So putting forth her hand, it hapned to light upon his face,which she felt to be as cold as yce: whereat marvailing not alittle, as also at his continued silence, she jogged him, and felt hishands in like manner, which were stiffely extended forth, and allhis body cold, as not having any life remaining in him, whichgreatly amazing her, and confounding her with sorrow beyond allmeasure, she was in such perplexity, that she could not devise what todo or say.
3.  Then I called to minde, that having redelivered the Purse and Girdleto his shee-Messenger, which brought them with lookes sufficient todeclare my discontentment: I called her backe againe, fearing leastshe would keep them to her selfe, and make him beleeve that I hadreceived them (as I have heard such kinde of women use to dosometimes) and in anger I snatcht them from her, and have brought themyou, to the end, that you may give him them againe; and tell him, Ihave no need of any such things, thankes be to heaven and myhusband, as no woman can be better stored then I am. Wherefore goodFather, purposely am I now come to you, to let him know, that if hewill not abstaine from thus molesting me, I will disclose it to myHusband, Father, and Brethren, whatsoever befall. For I had ratherhe should receive the injury, then I to be causelessly blamed for him;wherein good Father tell me, if I dooe not well. With manycounterfet sobbes, sighes, and teares these words were delivered;and drawing foorth from under her gowne, a very faire and richpurse, as also a Girdle of great worth, she threw them into the Friarslappe.
4、  And never dread to see that joyfull day.
5、  You need make no doubt, but the poore maide wept exceedingly, as shehad good occasion to doe: and albeit many times she desired mercy, andthat hee would not bee so cruell to her: yet notwithstanding, hervoyce was so broken with crying, and his impacience so extreame,that rage hindered all power of distinguishing, or knowing his wivestongue from a strangers. Having thus madly beaten her, and cut thelockes off from her head, thus he spake to her. Wicked woman, and nowife of mine, be sure I have not done with thee yet; for, although Imeane not now to beate thee any longer: I will goe to thy brethren,and they shall understand thy dishonest behaviour. Then will I bringthem home with me, and they perceiving how much thou hast abusedboth their honour and thine owne; let them deale with thee as theyfinde occasion, for thou art no more a companion for me. No sooner hadhe uttered these angry words, but hee went forth of the Chamber,bolting it fast on the outward side, as meaning to keepe her safelyinclosed, and out of the house he went alone by himselfe.

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  • 胡舜陟 08-07

      The Chamber-Gentlewoman Lesca, willingly undertooke the LadiesEmbassie; and so soone as opportunity did favor her: having withdrawnePyrrhus into an apt and commodious place, shee delivered the Messageto him, in the best manner she could devise. Which Pyrrhus hearing,did not a little wonder thereat, never having noted any such matter;and therefore sodainly conceyved, that the Lady did this onely totry him; whereupon, somewhat roundly and roughly, hee returned thisanswere. Lesca, I am not so simple, as to credite any such Messageto be sent from my Lady, and therefore be better advised of thy words.But admit that it should come from her, yet I cannot be perswaded,that her soule consented to such harsh Language, far differing froma forme so full of beuty. And yet admit againe, that her hart andtongue herein were relatives: My Lord and Master hath so farrehonoured mee, and so much beyond the least part of merite in mee: as Iwill rather dye, then any way offer to disgrace him: And therefore Icharge thee, never more to move mee in this matter.

  • 王明浩 08-07

      Thus Aniolliero, purposing to visite his Cousin the Cardinal likea Gallant, and at the Marquisate of Ancona, returned backe poorly inhis shirt unto Buonconvento, and durst not (for shame) repaire toSienna. In the end, he borrowed money on the other horse whichFortarigo rode on, and remained there in the Inne, whence riding toCorsignano, where he had divers Kinsmen and Friends, he continuedthere so long with them, till he was better furnished from his Father.

  • 洪增林 08-07

       Calandrino stampt and fretted exceedingly, saying: As I am a trueman to God, my Prince, and Countrey, I tell thee truly, that my Brawneis stolne. Say so still I bid thee (answered Bruno) and let all theworld beleeve thee, if they list to do so, for I will not. Wouldstthou (quoth Calandrino) have me damne my selfe to the divell? I seethou dost not credit what I say: but would I were hanged by the necke,if it be not true, that my Brawne is stolne. How can it possible be,replyed Bruno? Did not I see it in thy house yesternight? Wouldst thouhave me beleeve, that it is flowne away? Although it is not flowneaway (quoth Calandrino) yet I am certain, that it is stolne away:for which I am weary of my life, because I dare not go home to mineowne house, in regard my wife will never beleeve it; and yet if sheshould credite it, we are sure to have no peace for a twelve monthsspace.

  • 邢钢 08-07

      After some part of the night was overpast, they divided themselvesinto two bands, one to guard Isabellaes Dorter doore, the other tocarry newes to the Abbesse, and knocking at her Closet doore, saide.Rise quickely Madame, and use all the hast you may, for we haveseene a man enter our Sister Isabellaes Dorter, and you may take herin bed with him. The Lady Abbesse, who (the very same night) had thecompany of a lusty Priest in bed with her selfe, as oftentimesbefore she had, and he being alwayes brought thither in a Chest:hearing these tidings, and fearing also, lest the Nunnes hastieknocking at her doore, might cause it to fly open, and so (by theirentrance) have her owne shame discovered: arose very hastily, andthinking she had put on her plaited vaile, which alwayes she walkedwith in the night season, and used to tearme her Psalter; she putthe Priests breeches upon her head, and so went away in all hastwith them, supposing them verily to be her Psalter: but making fastthe Closet doore with her keye, because the Priest should not bediscovered.

  • 湛岳登 08-06

    {  To wish or prove;

  • 埃莱娜·康威·穆雷 08-05

      I meane not to commend either the one or other, because they donot alwayes fall out to be true; neither are they at all timeslyars. Now, that they prove not all to be true, we can best testifieto our selves. And that they are not alwayes lyars, hath alreadysufficiently bene manifested, by the Discourse of Madame Philomena,and as you shall perceive by mine owne, which next commeth in order tosalute you. Wherefore, I am of this opinion, that in matters of goodlife, and performing honest actions; no dreame is to be fearedpresaging the contrary, neither are good works any way to be hindredby them. Likewise, in matters of bad and wicked quality, althoughour dreames may appeare favourable to us, and our visions flatter uswith prosperous successe: yet let us give no credence unto the best,nor addict our minds to them of contrary Nature. And now we wil.proceed to our Novell.}

  • 刘保奇 08-05

      Where the Queen, looking on Madam Philomena, gave her the honor ofbeginning the first Novell for that day: whereto shee dutifullycondiscending, began as followeth.

  • 李跃旗 08-05

      So, sitting in a pretended musing a while, at length he said. Myhonourable guests, it is now more then high time, that I should doeyou such honour, as you have most justly deserved, by performing thepromise made unto you. Then calling two of his servants, he sentthem to Madame Catharina (whom he had caused to adorne her self inexcellent manner) entreating her, that she would be pleased to gracehis guests with her presence. Catharina, having deckt her child incostly habiliments, layed it in her armes, and came with theservants into the dyning Hall, and sate down (as the Knight hadappointed) at the upper end of the Table, and then Signior Gentilespake thus. Behold, worthy Gentlemen, this is the jewell which Ihave most affected, and intend to love none other in the world; be youmy judges, whether I have just occasion to doe so, or no? TheGentlemen saluting her with respective reverence, said to theKnight; that he had great reason to affect her: And viewing heradvisedly, many of them thought her to be the very same woman (asindeed she was) but that they beleeved her to be dead.

  • 孙硕 08-04

       THE SIXT DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL

  • 文森特·贝克 08-02

    {  The Monke, though his delight with the Damosell was extraordinary,yet feare and suspition followed upon it; for, in the very height ofall his wantonnesse, he heard a soft treading about the doore. Andprying thorow a small crevice in the same dore, perceived apparantly,that the Abbot himselfe stood listening there, and could not beignorant but that the Maide was with him in the Chamber. As afterpleasure ensueth paine, for the veniall Monke knew well enough (thoughwanton heate would not let him heede it before) that most greevouspunishment must bee inflicted on him, which made him sad beyond allmeasure: Neverthelesse, without disclosing his dismay to the yongMaiden, he began to consider with himselfe on many meanes, wherebyto find out one that might best fit his turne. And suddenlyconceited an apt stratagem, which sorted to such effect as he wouldhave it: whereupon, seeming satisfied for that season, he tolde theDamosell, that (being carefull of her credit) as hee had brought herin unseene of any, so he would free her from thence againe, desiringher to tarrie there (without making any noyse at all) untill such timeas he returned to her.

  • 吴开义 08-02

      Beleeve mee Gentlewoman (speaking to the widdowe her selfe) itshould not appeare strange to any of wisedome and discretion, that Iam amorously enclined, and especially to you, because you are wellworthy of it. And although those powers, which naturally appertaine tothe exercises of Love, are bereft and gone from aged people; yetgood will thereto cannot be taken from them, neither judgement to knowsuch as deserve to be affected: for, by how much they exceede youth inknowledge and experience, by so much the more hath nature made themmeet for respect and reverence. The hope which incited me (being aged)to love you, that are affected of so many youthfull Gallants, grewthus. I have often chaunced into divers places, where I have seeneLadies and Gentlwomen, being disposed to a Collation or rerebanquetafter dinner, to feede on Lupines, and young Onions or Leekes, andalthough it may be so, that there is little or no goodnesse at allin them; yet the heads of them are least hurtfull, and most pleasingin the mouth. And you Gentlewomen generally (guided by unreasonableappetite) will hold the heads of them in your hands, and feede uponthe blades or stalkes: which not onely are not good for any thing, butalso are of very bad savour. And what know I (Lady) whether amongthe choise of friends, it may fit your fancy to doe the like? For,if you did so, it were no fault of mine to be chosen of you, butthereby were all the rest of your suters the sooner answered.

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